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Full text of "Trinity College School Record October 1944-August 1945"

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Corporation of 
Trinity College School 

VISITOR: 
His Grace the Archbishop of Toronto and Primate of All Canada. 

GOVERNING BODY 
Ex-Offiao Members 

The Chancellor of Trinity University. 

The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College. 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., B.Paed., Headmaster. 

Elected Members 

The Hon. Mr. Justice R. M. Dennistoun, C.B.E., V.D., Bj\., LL.D Winnipeg 

Robert P. Jellett, Esq Montreal 

G. B. Strathy, Esq., K.C., M.A Toronto 

Norman Seagram, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. Senator G. H. Barnard, K.C Victoria, B.C. 

Col. J. W. Langmuir, M.B.E., V.D Toronto 

Capt. Colin M. Russell Montreal 

J. H. Lithgow, Esq Toronto 

A. E. Jukes, Esq Vancouver, B.C. 

Col. H. C. Osborne, C.M.G., C.B.E., V.D., M.A Ottawa 

Hugh F. Labatt, Esq London, Ont. 

F. G. Mathers, Esq., B.A., LL.B Winnipeg 

Major B. M. Osier Toronto 

J. Bruce Mackmnon, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. R. C. Matthews, P.C, B.A Toronto 

Squadron Leader Charles Bums Toronto 

The Right Rev. R. J. Renison, M.A., D.D Iroquois Falls, Ont. 

Vice Admiral Percy W. Nelles, R.C.N Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. J. Ewart Osborne, D.S.O., V.D., B.Sc Toronto 

T. Roy Jones, Esq Toronto 

Air Marshal W. A. Bishop, V.C, D.S.O., M.C., D.F.C, LL.D Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. Gerald W. Birks, O.B.E Montreal 

J. D. Johnson, Esq Montreal 

Major W. M. Pearce, M.C Toronto 

G. Meredith Huycke, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

S. S. DuMoulin, Esq Hamilton 

Argue Martin, Esq., K.C Hamilton 

T, W. Seagram, Esq Waterloo, Ont. 

Gerald Larkin, Esq Toronto 

R. V. LeSueur, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

Wilder G. Penfield, C.M.G., M.D., D.S.C., F.R.S., F.R.C.S Montreal 

Captain Strachan Ince, D.S.C Toronto 

Appointed by Trinity College 
The Hon. Mr. Justice P. H. Gordon, C.B.E., K.C, M.A., LL.D., B.C.L. 

Elected by the Old Boys 

P. A. DuMoulin, Esq London, Ont. 

Capt. P. G. Campbell, M.C Toronto 

Major H. L. Symons, E.D Toronto 



Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. 

l^OUNDED 1865 

Head Master 

P. A. C. Ketch UM, Esq., M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge; B.A., Trinity 

College, Toronto; B.Paed., Toronto. St. Mark's School, Southborough, 

Mass., 1929-1933. (1933) 

House Masters 
C. Scott, Esq., London University. (Formerly Headmaster of King's CoUegt 

School, Wmdsor). (1934) 
R. G. S. Maier, Esq., B.A., Harvard; University of Paris; Cornell University. (1936) 

Chaplain 
The Rev. E. R. Bagley, M.A., St. Peter's Hall, Oxford; Ridley Hall, Cambridge. 
(1944). 

Assistant Masters 

Col. H. V. de Bury, C.B.E., Royal Military College, Kingston, 1905-10; Stoney- 

hurst College, England. (1943) 

F. P. Gregoris, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; University of London; University 

of Rome; B.Ph.; Ph.L. (1943) 

G. R. GwYNNE-TiMOTHY, EsQ., B.A., Jesus College, Oxford. (1944). 

G. A. Hill, Esq., B.A., University College, Toronto; Ontario College of Education. 

(1942) 
A. B. HoDGETTS, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto; University of Wisconsin. 

(1942) 
A B. Key, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; Ontario College of Education. (1943) 
P. H. Lewis, Esq., M.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. (1922) 
P. H. J. Meyer, Esq., B.A.; United College, St. Andrew's, Scotland; McGill 

University. (1944). 
W. K. MoLSON, Esq., B.A., McGill University. (Jan. 1942) 
A. C. Morris, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N.S. (1921) 
A. H. N. Snelgrove, Esq., Mount Allison University. (1942) 
R. Thompson, Esq., M.A., St. Catherine's College, Cambridge; Santander. (1942) 

Tutor 
Lieut.Col. K. L. Stevenson, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. (1930) 

Visiting Masters 

Edmund Cohu, Esq Music 

S J. Dolin, Esq., Mus. Bac Music 

Physical Inttructor for both Schools 
Liblt. S. J. Batt, Royal Fusiliers; formerly Physical Instructor at R.M.C, 
Kingston, Ontario. (1921) 

THE JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Principal 

C. J. Tottenham, Esq., B.A., Queen's University, Kingston. (1937) 

Assistant Masters 
H. G. James, Esq., Leeds University. (1922). 

J. D. Burns, Esq., University of Toronto, Normal School, Toronto. (1943). 
Mrs. Cecil Moore, Normal School, Peterborough. (1942). 

D. W. Morris, Esq., Normal School, London. (1944). 

H. C. Swallow, Esq., B.A.. University of Toronto. (1944). 



Bursar G. C. Temple, Esq. 

Physician F. W. Diamond, Esq., M.D. 

Nurse Miss Rhea Fide, R.N. 

Dietitian Mrs. J. F. Wilkin 

Matron (Senior School ) Miss E. M. Smith 

Nurse-Matron (Junior School) Mrs. G. Sturgeon, R.N. 

Dietitian (Junior School) Mrs. D. M. Crowe 

Secretary Miss E. M. Gregory 



SCHOOL DIRECTORY 

PREFECTS 
E. J. M. Huycke (Head Prefea), P. C. Dobell. 

SENIORS 

H. C. D. Cox, H. French, E. Howard, J. M. Irwin, E. McC. Sinclair, 

J. R. deC. Warner, T. McC. Wade, J. R. McMurrich, H. C. Butterfield, 

G. P. Vernon, P. H. Mclntyre. 

HOUSE OFFICERS 

D. A. Davidson, G. C. Bovaird, J. N. Matthews, J. G. Greig, D, A. Decker, 

J. McN. Austin, D. D. Wilson, P. L. Qlbert, G. A. H. Pearson, V. Dawson, 

R. V. S. Smith, W. G. McDougall, D. H. Roenisch, R. A. Hope, K. Bannister, 

R. C. Paterson, R. M. Kirkpatrick, P. C. Stratford, F. A. H. Greenwood. 

CHAPEL 

Head Sacristan — D. S. Hare. 

Sacristans 

I. B. Campbell, W. A. Curtis, J. B. Dawson, V. Dawson, H. A. Hyde, 

W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, R. W. S. Robertson, D. H. Roenisch, 

C. J. Scott, T. McC. Wade, R. L. Watts. 

FOOTBALL 
Captain — E. J. M. Huycke. Vice-Captains — E. McC. Sinclair, P. H. Mclntyre 

SOCCER 

Captain — H. C. D. Cox. Vice-Captain — J. C. Barber 

GYM 

Captain — D. M. O'Grady. Vice-Captain — J. G. Gibson 

THE RECORD 

Editor-in-Chief— P. C. Dobell 
Assistant Editors — S. C. Edmonds, G. P. Vernon, E. McC. Sinclair, T. McC. Wade. 

THE LIBRARY 

Librarian — G. D. Wliite; Assistant — ^J. B. Dawson 

Carnegie Room — J. L. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle 

Used Book Room — D. S. Hare, J. B. Dawson 

Lights Boys — H. P. Goodbody, P. L. Goering, R. M. Merry 

Flag Boy—]. H. Caldbick 



Trinity College School Record 

VOL. 48, NO. 1. OCTOBER, 1944. 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Active Service List 

Editorial 1 

In Memoriam — 

Lieut.-CoL A. P. Ardagh 3 

Captain A. L. Smith 4 

Flight Lieut. J. W. F. Peacock 5 

L.A.C. W. G. M. Strong 8 

Chapel Notes 10 

School Notes — - 

Gifts to the School 16 

The Scholfield Memorial 16 

Matriculation Results 17 

Millward's Scholarships 18 

Royal Canadian Naval College 19 

Letter from the Governor General i. . . 19 

Summer Jobs 20 

Staff Changes 21 

The Library 22 

Cadet Camp 23 

Military Studies 23 

New Boys' Picnic 24 

Music 24 

Visit of Dr. Nickel 25 

Visit of Brigadier Wyman 25 

The Old Boys' Week-end 26 

Scholarships 26 

Brief Biographies 27 

Valete 37 

Salvete 39 

Contributions — 

II est Mon Bravement 43 

Scorm Brewing 44 

Our Cross 45 

Letter to the Editor 45 

Off the Record- 
Down with Sherlock 47 

Dismay 48 

Rugby- 
Editorial 49 

Bigside 51 

Middleside 58 

Littleside 61 

Soccer 62 

New Boys' Race 65 

The Junior School Record 66 

Old Boys' Notes- 
Honours 73 

Missing 76 

Wounded 77 

Old Boys' Notes— II 99 

Binhs, Marriages, Deaths 102 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

MICHAELMAS TERM, 1944 

Sept. 12 Tenn begins for New Boys. 

13 Term begins for others. 

30 T.C.S. vs. Pickering, at Toronto. 
Oct. 4 T.C.S. vs. Peterborough Collegiate, at Port Hope. 

Soccer vs. R.C.A.F. Mountain View, at Port Hope. 

8 Harvest Thanksgiving Service. 

9 Thanksgiving Day: Magee Cup Cross Country Race. 
Old Boys vs. T.C.S. 

13 T.C.S. vs. U.T.S., at Toronto. 

14 Soccer vs. Trinity College, at Toronto. 

15 The Rev. C. John Frank speaks in Chapel. 
18 Soccer vs. R.A.F. Picton, at Picton. 

21 First Month's Marks. 

T.C.S. vs. S.A.C., at Port Hope. 

22 Church Parade to St. Mark's. 

The Right Rev. R. J. Renison ('86-'92), M.A., D.D., Bishop of Moosonee, 
speaks in Chapel. 
25 Soccer vs. R.C.A.F. Mountain View, at Mountain View. 

28 T.C.S. vs. Ridley, at Varsity Stadium, Toronto. 

29 The Rev. Canon L. A. Dixon speaks in Chapel. 
Nov. 4 T.C.S. vs. U.C.C., at Toronto. 

10 Annual Oxford Cup Cross Country Race. 

12 Wing Cmdr. the Rev. W. B. Jennings speaks in Chapel. 

15 Ross Pratt, eminent Canadian pianist, gives recital in Hall. 

23 The Rev. Brian Green speaks in Chapel. 

25 Second Month's Marks. 

26 The Right Rev. L. W. B. Broughall, Bishop of Niagara, speaks in Chapel. 
29 The Conservatory Trio gives recital in Hall. 

Dec. 11 Christmas Examinations begin. 

17 Carol Service, 5 p.m. 

20 Christmas Holidays begin. 

Jan. 10 Lent Term begins. 



Prayer in Use In the Chapel for Old Boys 
on Active Service 

O Almighty God, who art wiser than the 
children of men and overrulest all things to their 
good, hold, we beseech Thee, in Thy keeping all 
who have gone forth to battle for our cause, 
especially those from this School: watch over 
those that are missing : comfort and protect those 
in the hands of the enemy. Be with them in the 
hour of danger, strengthen them in the hour of 
weakness, sustain and comfort them in the hour 
of sickness or of death. Grant that they may be 
true to their calling and true always to Thee, 
and make both them and us to be strong to do our 
duty in Thy service, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. 

ACTIVE SERVICE LIST 

The following information is complete according to 
our records as of October 24, 1944. We realize there must 
be many omissions and corrections to be remedied; any in- 
formation concerning Old Boys on Active Service will be 
gratefully received: 

1941-42 ABRAHAM, J. A.. P/O. R.C.A.F. 

1935-36 ADAMS, R. C, Sergt., R.C.A. 

1935 ADAMS, S. M., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1925-26 AHEARN. T. T., Lieut., 4th. P.L.D.G. 

1928-35 ALDEN, J., A.C.I, R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 ALEXANDER, T. L., M.B.E., Lieut., Algon- 
quin Regt. (Missing). 

1929-35 ALLAN, M. B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-33 AMBROSE. D. R.. F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1931-34 AMBROSE, P. J.. Gnr., R.C.A. 

1927-.32 AMBROSE. S. H., Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1925-34 ANNESLEY, J. C. L., Lieut., R.C.N. 

1932-35 ARCHBOLD, G. J. D.. R.C.N.V.R. 

1921-23 ARCHIBALD, B. M., Colonel, R.E. 

1925-27 ARCHIBALD. C. R., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 

1924-28 ARCHIBALD. R. L.. Captain, the Black Watch 
(R.H.R.) of Canada. 



1928-31 ARCHIBALD, T. D., Capt.. R.C.A. (Prisoner 

of War). 

1 1922-27 ARDAGH, A. P., Lieut.-Col., B.C. Dragoons 

(Killed in Action) 

1938-40 ARMOUR, D. E. P., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1906-10 ARMOUR, E. B. P., Colonel, M.D.2. 

1938-41 ARMOUR, P. G. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1924-32 ARMOUR, W. E., Capt, R.C.A.M.C. 

1929-37 ARMSTRONG, D. H., A.F.C., F/L., R.C.A.F. 

1923-24 ARNOLD, J. P., Captain, N.D.H.Q. 

1 1933-35 ATKIN, J. W., P/0, R.C.A.F. (Killed on 

Active Service) 

1939-42 ATKIN, R. H., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1911-12 ATWOOD, J. P. C, Major, Armoured Corps. 

1939-42 AUSTIN, J. McN., Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

1937-39 AVERY, J. R., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1930-33 BAILLIE, J. F., Lieut., the Black Watch (R. 

H.R.) of Canada. 

1909-12 BAKER, C. E., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1914-19 BAKER, M. H., Major, R.C.O.C. 

1922-27 BALDWIN, W. K. W., M.B.E., Capt., Toronto 

Scottish Regt. 

1930-31 BALDWIN, W. W., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1922-27 BALFOUR, St. C, Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 

1937-39 BALFOUR, W. S., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1925-31 BAND, J. T., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-35 BANKIER, P. D., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1942-44 BANISTER, P. G. McC, Cadet, R.C.N. 

1930-31 BARNES, R. E., Lieut, R.C.A. 

1938-42 BARNETT, J. W., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1920-22 BARROW, F. B., Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1937-39 BEAIRSTO, W. H., Lieut., Winnipeg Gren. 

1936-39 BEARDSHAW, R. F., Stoker I, R.C.N. 

1935-38 BEATTY, R. P., Trp/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1919-27 BEATTY, W. L., Major, 48th. Highlanders of 

Canada. 

1934-37 BEDDOE, A. C, F/O., R.C.A.F. 

1942-43 BEDORE, G. E., Sub-Lieut., R.N.F.A.A. 

1941-43 BEEMAN, W. J. M., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1924-27 BELL. J. T., Major, R.H.L.I. 

n 



1938-41 BERKINSHAW, W. R., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1940-41 BERRY, L. R., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 BEST, G. H., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1918 BETHUNE, A. C, A/Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1905-10 BETHUNE, R. T., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1910-14 BETHUNE, W. D., L/Cpl., R.C.E. (demobUized) 

1932-35 BEVAN, K. W. A., Lieut., D.F.C., U.S. Army 

Air Corps. 

1921-27 BIGGAR, H. T., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1 1929-34 BILKEY, J. D., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (Killed on 

Active Service). 

1921-23 BINGHAM, C. S. K., Lieut., 4th P.L.D.G. 

1939-42 BIRKS, R. I., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1941-43 BLACK, E. P., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1931-37 BLACK, W. A., A.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing) 

1936-40 BLACK, W. B., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1919-24 BLAIKIE, G. R., Major, R.C.A. 

1939-42 BLAIKLOCK, D. M., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1938-41 BOGGS, J. D., Jr. W.O., R.C.A.F. 

1920-21 BONNYCASTLE, C. H., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-32 BONNYCASTLE, G. F., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1919-26 BOONE, G. L., Major, 48th. Highlanders of 

Canada. 

1919-20 BOSTOCK, W. N., Brigadier, R.C.E. 

Master BOULDEN, C. H., M.B.E., Chaplain and Hon. 

Major, C.M.H.Q. 

1920-28 BOULTON, W. D.. Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

Master BOWERS, H., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1937-40 BOWMAN, M. C. D., M.C., Lieut., Royal Can. 

Regiment. 

1940-42 BOWMAN, S. J., Gdsm.. Armoured Corps. 

1905-07 BOYCE, C. D., Major, C.A.T.C. 

Master BRACK, C. F., Lieut., R.A. 

1929-33 BRADEN, W. G., Major, R.C.O.C. 

1923-26 BRAIN, R. T. F., M.C., Chaplain and Hon. 

Capt.. S.D. & G. Highlanders. 

1928-31 BRAINERD, T. C, Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1923-28 BRIDGER, J. R., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1928-33 BRIDGER, N. C, Capt., American Fid. Service. 

1941-43 BROOKS, D. A., A/LA., R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

m 



1911-13 BROUGHALL, H. S., M.C., D.F.C., Grp. Capt., 

R.A.F. 

1912-17 BROUGHALL, J. H. S., Major, Irish Regt. of 

Canada. 

1927-32 BROUGHALL, W. H., Major, R.H.L.I. 

1927-31 BROWN, C. McC., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 

1927-32 BROWNE, A. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1917-19 BRUCE, A., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-33 BRUNTON, E. F. L., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 

1937-39 BRYSON, J., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 

1933-37 BUCK, E. C, Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

1924-25 BUCK, J. H., Captain, R.C.A. 

1922-24 BUCK, W. M., Captain, R.C.A. 

1912-14 BULL, R. O., Colonel & O.C., Prisoner of War 

Camp. 

1925-29 BUNTING, C. W., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 

1929-30 BUNTING, J. R., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1921-25 BURNS, C. F. W., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1938-40 BURROWS, C. A., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1940-43 BUTLER, J. D., Tpr., Armoured Corps. 

1928-31 BYERS, A. G., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing). 

1926-30 BYERS, D. N., Major, R.C.A. 

1940-42 CALDBICK, G., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1938-42 CALDWELL, T. A., Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. 

1917-19 CAMPBELL, A. P., C.B.E., Grp. Capt., R.A.F. 

1922-27 CAMPBELL, J. D. C, Lieut., R.C.O.C. 

1919 CAMPBELL, M. R., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1924-26 CAPE, J. M., Major, R.C.A. 

1919-21 CAPREOL, J. H. D., Pte., R.C.O.C. 

f 1930-32 CARLING, L. I., Lieut., Royal Canadian Regt. 

(Killed in Action). 

1940-43 CARMECHAEL, D. G. O., Coder, R.N.V.R. 

tl920-26 CARTWRIGHT, G. S., F/0, R.C.A.F. (Killed 

in Action). 

1935-38 CARTWRIGHT, J. R. C, Gnr., R.C.A. " 

1918-23 CASSELS, J. G., Major, R.C.A. 

1916-21 CASSELS, R. F., Sergt. -Instr., R.C.A.F. 

1926-33 CASSELS, W. P., Capt., R.C.O.C. (demobilized) 

1931-34 CASSILS, M., Capt., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) 

of Canada. 

IV 



1927-36 CASTLE, G. V., Pte., U.S. Army. 

1925-30 CASTLE, J. H., Lieut.-Cmdr., U.S. Navy. 

1912-13 CATTO, J. M., E.D., Major, R.C.C.S. 

1938-42 CAWLEY, J. C, F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1933-39 CAYLEY, E. C, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1916-20 CAYLEY, H. C, Captain, C.M.H.Q. 

1937-40 CAYLEY, P. H., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N. 

1931-34 CHADWICK, W. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1940-42 CHARTERS, A. H., L/Cpl., C.A.T.C. 

1939-41 CHEYNEY, B. J. K.. L.N.A., R.N.F.A.A. 

1940-42 CHIPMAN, W. N. A., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1926-31 CHOWN, R. E., Captain, R.C.A. 

1938-39 CLARK. K. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-32 CLARKE, H. H., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1940-43 CLARKE, L. D., Q/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

+1935-38 CLELAND, C. L., P/0, R.C.A.F. (Missing, 
Presumed Killed in Action). 

1928-30 CLELAND, D., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1924-28 CLELAND, J. G., Capt., Toronto Scottish Regt. 

1926-30 CLELAND. W. M., Capt.. Armoured Corps, 
(demobilized). 

1929-33 CLEVELAND, J. B., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1926-30 CLEVELAND, P. L.. Capt., R.C.E. 

Master COATES, R. C. Lieutenant, R.N.V.R. 

1928-35 COCHRAN, F. E., Captain, R.C.A.S.C. 

+ 1926-32 COMBE. J. O., Lieut., Western Ont. Regiment, 
(Killed in Action). 

1941-4.3 COMMON, D. L., Cadet Capt.. R.C.N. 

1911-13 COOK. T. R.. Major, Can. Forestry Corps. 

1923-24 CORRIGALL. D. J.. Major, P.P.C.L.I. 

1926-30 COULSON. J. F.. Pte.. 48th. Highlanders of 
Canada. 

1937-39 COULTIS, J. S., P.O., R.C.N.V.R. 

1921-22 COWAN. O. D.. Lieut.-Colonel, R.C.A. 

+1924-30 COWPERTHWAITE. E. M., F/0., R.A.F. 

(Killed in Action). 

+ 1924-31 COWPERTHWAITE, L., F/0., R.C.A.F. (Killed 
in Action). 

1928-33 COX, J. C, A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

Master CRAKE. J. E. A., Lieut.. C.A.T.C. 



1937-39 CRAWFORD, D. G., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1921-27 CROLL, I. B., F/0, R.C.A.F. (Missing). 

1910-18 CROLL, L. D., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A.M.C. 

1934-35 CROMBIE, M. G., Bdr., R.C.A. 

1926-30 CROSSEN, W. M., Lieut, R.C.A.M.C. 

1912-16 CRUICKSHANK, G., Capt., R.C.A. 

1932-33 CRUMP, W. R., Sgn., R.C.C.S. 

1939-41 CULVER, D. M., Cpl., C.O.T.C. 

1916-23 CUMBERLAND, I. H., O.B.E., E.D., Brigadier, 

Armoured Corps. 

1921-25 CUMMINGS, W. F. A., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 

1917-18 CUNDILL, F. H., Capt., the Black Watch (R. 

H.R.) of Canada. 

1926-28 CURRELLY, J. C. N., 

1933-38 CURTIS, E. H., Cpl., U.S. Army. 

1928-37 CUTTEN, J. E., Lieutenant, R.C.A. 

1927-34 CUTTEN, W. H., Flt.-Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1919-21 DALTON, C. F. R., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1938-41 DALTON, W. B., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1937-42 DAVIDSON, I. J., Mids., R.C.N. 

1933-36 DAVIS, N. C, Capt., R.C.A. 

1930-35 DAWES, D. K., Capt., R.C.A. 

1926-31 DAWSON, D. B., Captain, R.C.A. 

1941-44 DAY, R. E., A.C.I, R.C.A.F. 

1923-26 DEFRIES, J. G., Lieut., 48th Highlanders of 

Canada. 

1919-22 DELAHEY, F. C, F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1916-20 DeLOM, T. C. B., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1936-41 DIGNAM, H. R., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1920-22 DILLANE, E. L., L/Cpl., R.C.A.M.C. 

1920-22 DILLANE, J. E., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1923-24 DILLANE, R. G., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

Master DDCON, G. H., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1940-43 DODD, J. H. B., P/0, R.A.F. 

1927-32 DOOLITTLE, J. R., F/L., R.CA.F. 

1935-36 DOUGLAS, G. C, Major, R.C.O.C. 

1933-36 DOUGLAS, P. H., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1928 DOUGLAS, R. D., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1927-31 DOUGLAS, R. F., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1919-23 DOULL, A. K., Pay. Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

VI 



1919-21 DOUPE, C. S., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1940-41 DRAPER, J. W. P., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1921-23 DUDLEY, E. J. S., Lieut.-Col., Sask. Lt. Infy. 

1927-29 DUFF, R. P., Sergt., R.C.A. 

1937-41 DUGGAN, R. B., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1937-41 DUGGAN, W. R., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-31 DUMARESQ, C. F., Lieut., P.P.C.L.I. 

1916-18 DUMBRILLE, J. C., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1921-25 DuMOULIN, R. T., Lieut.-Col., N.D.H.Q. 

1910-17 DUNBAR, A., Major, R.C.A. 

1940-42 DUNCAN, J. A. C, Lieut., Grenadier Guards. 

1926-32 DUNCANSON, A. A., Major, Royal Regt. of 
Canada. 

1933-41 DUNCANSON, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1927-31 DYKES, C. P. J., Capt, R.C.E. 

1934-39 EARLE, G. A. P., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 

1929-35 EDE, E. D., F/Q, R.A.F. 

tl930-34 EDE, H. F. G., D.F.C., F/0, R.C.A.F. (KUled 
in Action). 

Master EDWARDS, C. A. M., Sergt., Personnel Selec- 
tion Board. 

1910-12 EMERY, H. J., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1928-32 EMMANS, R. W., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1938-40 ERENHOUS, L. D., W.0.1, R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 EVANS, A. H., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1918-23 EVANS, J. H., Lieut., R.C.E. 

1918-25 EVANS, J. L., A/Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1938-39 FAIRLIE, T. W., Lieut., R.C.O.C. (demobilized) 

1 1927-35 FERGUSON, A. McD., Lieut., Royal Regt. of 
Canada. (Killed in Action). 

1933-40 FINLEY, E. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1942-44 FISHER, J. P., Cadet, R.C.N. 

1927-29 FISHER, R. A., Lieut., Can. Fusiliers. 

1908-12 FISKEN, S. F., M.C. & Bar, Lieut.-Col., R.A. 

1936-37 FLEET, E. G., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1930-38 FLEMING, A. S., Lieut., Can. Field Security. 

1930-35 FLEMING, J. B. A., S/L, R.A.F. 

1939-42 FLEMING, W. R., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1933-38 FLOCK, D. A., Lieut., C.A.T.C. (demobilized). 

1930-34 FORTYE, R. A., Surg.-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

VII 



1918-20 FOSTER, G. M. D., Lieut, Q.O.R.C. 

1921-24 FRASER, M. P., Grp. Capt., R.C.A.F. 

1933-34 FREDERICK, F. O., Capt., Can. Dental Corps. 

1941-44 FULFORD, G. T., Cadet, R.C.N. 

1938-39 FULLERTON, H. D.. O/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1922-27 FYSHE, T. G., Major, R.C.A.M.C. 

1921-30 FYSHE, T. M., Capt., R.C.A. 

1920-23 GAISFORD, G., Lieut.-Col., Armoured Corps. 

1931-32 GALLOWAY, D. E., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1920-21 GARDINER, A. T., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1923-28 GARDINER, O. E. S., P/0., R.C.A.F. 

1937-42 GERMAN, A. B. C, Mids., R.C.N. 

1939-42 GIBBONS, M. A., 2nd. Lieut., B.M.I., British 
Army. 

1930-36 GIBSON, F. M., Lieut., R.C.A.P.C. 

1925-30 GIBSON, M. W., S/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing). 

1936-39 GIFFEN, P. J., A.C.I, R.C.A.F. 

1923-25 GILL, L. N., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1911-13 GILL, N. G., Lieut., Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1924-29 GILMOUR, J. P., P/0., R.C.A.F. 

1927-29 GLASS, D. C, Sergt., R.C.A.P.C. 

1918-22 GLASSCO, A. E., Major, Indian Army. 

1920-26 GLASSCO, C. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

Master GLOVER, R. G., Lieut., S.D. & G. Highlanders. 

1919-21 GODET, T. M. duB., Lieut., R.N.V.R. 

1926-33 GODSHALL, H. L., Capt., U.S. Artillery. 

1940-43 GOODALL, R. G. W., P/Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

Master GOODDAY, C, Major, Armoured Corps (de- 
mobilized). 

1942-43 GORDON, E. C, 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1 1922-25 GORDON, H. L., F/0., R.C.A.F., (Killed on 
Active Service). 

1909-11 GOSSAGE, B. F., M.C., Major, R.C.A. 

1913-17 GOSSAGE, G. M., Capt., Royal Regt. of Canada 
(demobilized). 

1937-43 GOURLAY, J. N., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1920-22 GRANT, G., Major, R.C.C.S. 

1930-32 GRANT, J. R., S/L, R.A.F. (Missing). 

1929-32 GRANT, R. D., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1930-32 GRAYDON, A. S., Capt., Can. Fusiliers (M.G.) 

vm 



1938-39 GREENE, M. D., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1936-41 GREENE, W. E., Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

1929-31 GREER, J. M., P/0., R.C.A.F. 

1929-32 GRIER, A. E., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1934-39 GRIPTON, J. M., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1913-18 GROUT, F. L. J., E.D., Major, Q.O.R.C. 

1935-39 GROVER, J. L., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1926-32 GUNN, J. M., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1927-29 HADDON, G. P. E., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 

1900-03 HAGARTY, W. G., D.S.O., Col., No. 31 Reserve 
Brigade Group. 

1914-15 HALE, J. J., Capt., R.C.A. 

1941-43 HALLER, P. N., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1936-39 HAMPSON, H. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-39 HAMPSON, J. G.. Lieut., D.Y.R.C. Hussars 
(demobilized). 

1936-39 HANCOCK, G. R. K., Capt., R.H.L.I. 

1940-42 HARE, P. D., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-30 HARRINGTON, C. F., Capt., R.C.A. 

1928-31 HARRINGTON, J. E., Lt.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-29 HARRIS, L. P.. Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1937-38 HARSTONE, J. C. R., Lieut., A. & S. High- 
landers. 

1936-41 HART, J. O., 2nd Lieut.. U.S.M.C.R. 

1934-38 HARVEY, W. C, Lieut.. R.C.N.V.R. 

Master HASS. H. C. F/0. R.C.A.F. 

1913-18 HAULTAIN. C. F., E.D., Capt., Midland Regt. 

1904-09 HAULTAIN, R. M., Capt., R.C.A. 

1940-43 HAYES. B. P.. 0/Sm.. R.C.N.V.R. 

1935-38 HAYES. J. S.. Lieut.. Calgary Highlanders. 

1938-42 HEATON. P. B.. Mids.. R.C.N. 

1922-27 HEES, G. H., Captain, R.C.A. 

+1934-35 HEES, W. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Killed on Active 
Service) . 

1933-37 HEIGHINGTON, A. G.. Gnr.. R.C.A. 

+ 1928-32 HEIGHINGTON. E. N. Capt., 48th. Highlanders 
of Canada. (Killed in Action). 

1930-36 HENDERSON. H. L., Lieut.. R.C.N.V.R. 

1917-18 HENDERSON, I. S., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1933-36 HENDERSON. J. M.. F/L, R.C.A.F. 

IX 



1930-33 HESSEY-WHITE, P. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1923-26 HEWITT, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1933-36 HEYBROEK, E. P., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1934-40 HIGGINBOTHAM, J. F. M., Tpr., Armoured 

Corps. 
1937-42 HIGGINS, L. T., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
tl934-35 KINGSTON, F. B., P/0, R.C.A.F. (Killed in 

Action). 
1929-34 KINGSTON, K. W., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
Master KISCOCKS, C. R., Lieut.-CoL, R.M. 
1936-38 HOBBS, R. B., P/0., R.C.A.F. 
1911-14 KOGG, W. S., Lieut., R.C.A. 
1941-43 KOLMAN, R. M., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 
1925-31 KOLMES, J., E.R.A., R.C.N.V.R. 
1937-41 KOLTON, L. J., Lieut., Armoured Corps. 
1 1937-41 KOPE, J. C. W., P/0, R.C.A.F. (KHled on 

Active Service). 
1912-16 KOWARD, E. F., M.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1926-31 KOWARD, P. P., Sergt., U.S. Marine Corps. 
1923-29 KOWARD, R. P., Major, R.C.A.M.C. 
1931-35 KOWLAND, V. W., A/Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C. 

N.V.R. 
1943-44 KUGKES, J. A., Pte., British Army. 
1933-36 KUGHES-KALLETT, D. K. C, Lieut., U.S. 

Forces. 
Master KUMBLE, A. H., Captain, Army Examiner. 
1925-31 HUME, J. J., Pte., West Nova Scotia Regt. 
1938-42 HUME, R. D., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 
1942-44 KUNGERFORD, T. E., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
+1929-31 HUNTER, C. H., W.0.1, R.C.A.F. (Killed on 

Active Service). 
1937-43 KUYCKE, F. A. M., Gnr., R.C.A. 
+1931-32 HYDE, G. G., F/O, R.C.A.F. (Killed in Action). 
+1936-39 KYNDMAN, F. T., Sergt.-PUot, R.C.A.F. (KUl- 

ed in Action). 
1935-37 HYNDMAN, H. K., Lieut., R.C.N. 
1923-28 INGLES, C. L., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 
1927-29 INGLIS, R. S., Lieut., R.C.A. 
1907-10 INGS, E. I. H., M.C., Major, C.A.T.C. 
1923-31 IRVINE, J. A., Lieut., R.C.A. 

X 



1934-38 IRWIN, D. M., Captain, Armoured Corps. 
1926-31 IRWIN, H. E., Major, R.C.A. 
1935-38 IRWIN, J. R., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 
tl939-40 JACKSON, J. D., Lieut., Q.O.R.C. (Killed in 

Action). 
1938-40 JACKSON, W. H., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 
1922-24 JAQUAYS, H. M., E.D., Lieut.-Col., the Black 

Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1906-08 JARVIS, A. E. deM., D.F.C., Croix de Guerre, 

S/L, R.C.A.F. 
1916-18 JARVIS, E. A. M., E.D., Major, N.D.H.Q. 
1937-42 JELLETT, J. D., Mids., R.C.N. 
1926-30 JEMMETT, D. E. ff., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1934-39 JEMMETT, J. L. ff., Capt., Armoured Corps. 
1940-43 JOHNSON, D. M., Pte., C.A.T.C. 
1929-31 JOHNSON, L. G., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 
1933-39 JOHNSON, R. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Prisoner 

of War). 
1917-22 JOHNSTON, D. C, Pte., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada, 
f 1930-37 JOHNSTON, M. G., Lieut., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. (Killed in Action). 
1935-41 JONES, A. R. C, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1920-22 JONES, A. W., Major, R.C.E. 
1917-19 JONES, C. E. F., Colonel, Can. Forestry Corps. 
1936-44 JONES, D. F. N., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 
1937-39 JONES, G. K., D.F.C., Lieut., U.S. Army Air 

Corps. 
1918-20 JONES, W. O., Capt., R.C.O.C. 
1937-38 JOY, D. H., Mids., R.C.N. 
1934-38 JUKES, A. J. K., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1929-35 KEEFER, E. C, Surg.-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1929-36 KEEFER, R. G., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1929-33 KERRIGAN, J. V., Captam, R.C.A. 
1938-41 KERRY, C. W., Gnr.. R.C.A. 
1909-11 KETCHUM, E. J., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 
1911-15 KETCHUM, H. F., Capt., Army Examiner. 
1912-18 KETCHUM, K. G. B., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
1935-37 KETCHUM, S. M. O., W.R.C.N.S. 
19,30 KIESEWETTER. W. B., Capt., U.S. Army Air 

Corps (Med.). 

XI 



I 



1930-31 KILGOUR, J. F., Capt., Can. Dental Corps. 

1920-26 KING, J. G., Lt. Cmdr., U.S.N.R. 

1928-31 KING. T. B., Lieut., Kent Regt. (Missing). 

1920-25 KINGSMILL, N., Major, 13th Infy. Bde. 

1922-30 KIRK, C. B. K., Lieut^ R.C.A.M.C. 

1 1933-39 KIRKPATRICK, H. J., Flt.-Sergt, R.C.A.F. 
(Missing, Presumed Killed in Action). 

1933-35 KLINE, J. E., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1937-40 KNAPP, J. D., P.F.C., U.S. Army Air Corps. 

1930-34 KNOX, G. B., Lieut., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) 
of Canada. 

1932-35 KORTRIGHT, L. H. G., Lieut., R.C.O.C. 

1939-41 KOVACS, R. V., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1942-44 LAING, C. A., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1941-42 LAING, G. D., P/0., R.C.A.F. 

1934-38 LAMBERT, E. H. N., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1934-43 LAMBERT, S. N., Cadet, Indian Army. 

1931-39 LANDRY, P. C, L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1930-35 LANGDALE, A. H., Spr., R.C.E. 

1937-39 LANGDON, W. H., Lieut., Royal Can. Regt. 

1935-40 LANGMUIR, J. W. C, F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1925-30 LASH, Z. R. B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-31 LAW, D. A., Lieut., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) 
of Canada. 

1926-30 LAW, J. F., Major, Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1933-34 LAWSON, D. A., Chief Wireless Officer, U.S. 
Merchant Marine. 

1899-04 LAWSON, H. O., Col., N.D.H.Q. 

1936-39 LAWSON, J. H., W.0.1, R.C.A.F. 

1938-43 LAWSON, J. P., Cadet, R.C.N. 

1933-34 LAWSON, W. A., Lieut., Cameron Highlanders. 

1937-40 LAYNE, J. H., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1919-21 LAZIER, H. D. F., Major, R.H.L.L (Prisoner 
of War) . 

1928-34 LEADBEATER, W. J., Capt., 48th. Highlan- 
ders of Canada. 

1931-37 LEATHER, E. H. C, Capt., R.C.A. 

1936-39 LEBROOY, P. B., Tpr., 4th P.L.D.G. 

1936-39 LEBROOY, P. J., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1898-03 LEE, J. F. G., M.C., Major, R.C.A.M.C. 

xn 



1923-26 LEGGAT, M. H., Pte., Seaforth Highlanders. 

1936-39 LeMESURIER, A. S., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1938-42 LeMESURIER, J. R., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1938-41 LEWIN, F. S., Cpl., R.C.A.S.C. 

1935-37 LEWIS, D. J., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1921-22 LIEB, J. S., Capt., Ordnance Dept., U.S. Army. 

1927-30 LINES, S. J. H., Gnr., R.C.A.S.C. 

1934-38 LITHGOW, C. H., Capt., Royal Can. Regt. 

1929-32 LITTLE, M. H., Surg.-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1938-42 LLOYD, J. B. C, L/Cpl., R.C.O.C. 

1922-27 LONDON, G. T., Major, Canadian Scottish 
Regiment. 

1918-19 LOOSEMORE, J. P., A/Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., 
R.C.N. 

1927-37 LOWE, W. B., O.F.C., R.A. 

1925-29 LUCAS, G. S., Lieut, R.C.A. 

1934-36 LUCAS, G. T., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1907-10 LUMSDEN, G. L., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1911-12 LUSSIER, E. J., D.F.C., S/L, R.C.A.F. 
+ 1924-28 LYON, R. P., Major, 48th Highlanders of Can- 
ada (Killed on Active Service). 

1921-25 LYON, W. D., F/0., R.C.A.F. 

1904-11 MACAULAY, N. H., D.S.O., Lieut.-Colonel, 
Armoured Corps. 

1916-21 MacCAUL, D. H., Grp. Capt., R.C.A.F. 

1941-42 MACDONALD, D. D., Cadet Officer, Can. Mer- 
chant Navy. 

1910-13 MACDONALD, D. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1922-27 MACDONALD, G. W. K., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1909-16 MACKENDRICK, D. E., Major, Q.O.R.C. 

1936-40 MacKENZIE, M. G., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 

1937-41 MacKINNON, P. B. L., Pte., R.C.O.C. 

1939-41 MACKINTOSH, A. J. F., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1915-20 MACKINTOSH, D. C, A/Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C. 
N.V.R. 

1922-25 MacLAURIN, A. L., Croix de Guerre, Capt, 
the Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 

1928-31 MacNUTT, E. G., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1935-38 MAGEE, A. G., Major, Royal Canadian Regt. 

1934-37 MAGEE, B. R. B., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

XIII 



1934-35 MAGEE, E. D. B., Major, R.C.E. 
tl930-32 MARKHAM, G. A., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
(Killed in Action). 

1931-35 MARTIN, E. D. K., P/Q., R.C.A.F. 

1927-29 MARTIN, H. A., Major, Armoured Corps. 

1920-26 MARTIN, H. A. R., M.C., Capt., R.C.A. 

1936-38 MARTIN, M.C., Tpr., D.Y.R.C. Hussars. 

1913-14 MARTINSON, P. J., Major, R.C.O.C. 

1902-07 MATHEWSON, F. S., D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., the 
Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 

1927-28 MAUGHAN, A. H., Captain, Canadian Grena- 
dier Guards. 

1936-40 McAVITY, H. K., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missmg). 

1934-36 McBRIDE, R. F., F/0, R.C.A.F. (Prisoner of 
War). 

1913-14 McCARTER, G. A., Brigadier, R.C.A. 

1917-18 McCarthy, D'A., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1940-41 McCAUGHEY, J. H., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-30 McCONNELL, J. N. S., T/5, U.S. Army. 

1934-39 McCONNELL, W. A., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1931-38 McCONNELL, W. W. S., Cpl., U.S. Army. 

1927-31 McCREA, A. E., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1935-38 McCULLOUGH, J. C, L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1919-21 McDonald, H. S., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Demobi- 
lized) . 

1923-24 McFARLANE, M. M., Capt., N.D.H.Q. 

1931-36 McFARLANE, P. A., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1929-33 McGINNIS, A. D., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1928-36 McGLASHAN, J. C, Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1936-38 McIVOR, A. M., Cpl., R.H.L.L 

1936-39 McIVOR, W. J., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-37 McLaren, F. G., Major, 48th. Highlanders of 
Canada. 

1919-22 McLAREN, H. D., Capt., R.C.A. 

1928-34 McLAREN, R. D., F/L, R.A.F. 

1921-25 McLAREN, R. E., Major, R.H.L.I. (repatriated 
P.O.W.) 

1939-42 McLEAN, A. R., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1927-30 McLEAN, D. W., M.C., Major, P.P.C.LX 



XIV 



1931-36 McLENNAN, J. L., Lieut., the Black Watch 
(R.H.R.) of Canada. 

1933-37 McLERNON, A. R., D.F.C., Wing Cmdr., R.C. 
A.F. 

1933-36 McLERNON, L. R., D.S.C., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
+1925-30 McMULLEN, J. E. T., Captain, Seaforth High- 
landers of Canada (Killed in Action). 

1926-28 Mcpherson, a. J., Pte., Toronto Scottish 
Regt. 

1924-28 MEDD, S. A., Bdr., R.A. 

1917-19 MERRY, R. E., A/Lieut. -Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1919-22 MERRY, R. L., E.D., Major, 48th Highlanders 
of Canada. 

1939-44 MICHAEL, F. B., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1926-32 MICKLE, W. J. 

1932-35 MILLER, W. B., Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1924-28 MILLICHAMP, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-35 MILLS, A. V. L., Lieut., the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada. 

1931-34 MITCHELL, J. S., L/Cpl., R.C.A.S.C. 
tl937-40 MONRO, G. G., Pte., Perth Reghnent. (Killed 
in Action). 

1928-38 MOOD, W., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1937-42 MOORE, A. B., Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. 
(Missing) . 

1935-38 MOORHOUSE, A. E., A/LA, U.S.N.A.T.C. 

1940-44 MORGAN, R. E. S., Pte., R.C.A.M.C. 

1933-44 MORRIS, R. T., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1930-41 MORRIS, W. D., Pay. Sub-Lieut., R.C.N. 

1928-33 MORRISEY, H. S., Lieut, R.C.A. 

1931-33 MORRISEY, J. P., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1917-21 MORSE, E. W., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1938-40 MORTON, R. T., Cpl., R.C.C.S. 

1939-41 MOYSEY, R. D., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1925-29 MUDGE, R. M. L., Cpl.. R.C.A.F. (Demobi- 
lized). 

1916-22 MULHOLLAND, R. D., Major. R.C.A. 

1911-13 MURISON. C. A. P., C.B., C.B.E., M.C., Maj.- 
Gen., R.A. 

1917-18 MURPHY, G. A., Captain, N.D.H.Q. 

1920-27 MUSSEN, P. V., F/O., R.C.A.F. 

XV 



1932-33 NATION, G. H., Lieut., R.C.N. V.R. 

1907-08 NELLES, P. W., C.B., Vice-Admiral, R.C.N. 

1940-43 NESBITT, A. M., Q/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-31 NEVILLE, D. G., N.A.2, R.A.F. Fleet Air Arm. 

1926-31 NEVILLE, D. H., Capt., U.S. Signal Corps. 

1926-31 NEVILLE, G. L., Ens., U.S.C.G.R. 

1929-33 NEWMAN, H. J. R., Lieut., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1925-29 NICHOL, T. E., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1919-24 NICHOLS, T. E., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
1941-44 NICOL, R. B., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
1927-29 NOBBS, F. J., Capt., Royal Can. Dragoons. 
1907-12 O'BRIAN, G. S., A.F.C., Grp. Capt., R.C.A.F. 
1928-32 O'BRIAN, P. G. S., D.F.C. and Bar, Wing 

Cmdr., R.A.F. 
1930-33 O'BRIEN, H. J. S., P/0, R.C.A.F. 
1919-21 OGILVIE, J. T., Capt, R.A. 
1916-19 OGILVIE, R. E. H., E.D., Major, Armoured 

Corps. 
Master OGLE, W., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
1938-42 OLDS, H. K., Pte., U.S. Army Air Corps. 
1915-20 ORCHARD, R. H. G., Lieut., R.C.E. 
1 1928-32 OSBORNE, J. W., Lieut., Argyle and Suther- 
land Regt. (Killed on Active Service). 
1920-26 OSLER, B. M., Major, R.C.A. 
1929-37 OSLER, C. R., Major, R.C.A. 
1916-23 OSLER, G. S., Major, 48th Highlanders of Can. 
1922-30 OSLER, J. G., Major, R.C.A. 
1926-34 OSLER, P. C, Lieut., P.P.C.L.I. (Prisoner of 

War). 
1927-33 OSLER, P. S., Major, R.C.A. 
+1921-29 OSLER, R. F., Lieut., 48th. Highlanders of 

Canada. (Killed in Action). 
1922-26 OSLER, W. E., Major, Q.O.C.H. 
1916-22 OSLER, W. R., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
1928-31 OSWALD, W. E. D., Lieut., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1929-33 PADLEY, C. C, Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
fMaster PAGE, W. D., W.O., R.C.A.F. (Killed in Action) 
1916-18 PANET, deL. H. M., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 

XVE 



1938-44 PARKER, E. M., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

Master PARR, D. K., Major, R.C.O.C. 

1931-41 PARR, J. K., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-38 PARTRIDGE, D. G., F/0., R.C.A.F. 

1930-35 PASSY, deL. E. S., Flt.-Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1931-35 PASSY, F. C, Major, R.A. 

1933-41 PATCH, C. M., Lieut., 4th K.S.L.I. 

1935-38 PATCH, H. M., Bdr., R.C.A. 

1933-36 PATCH, P. R., Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1929-32 PATCH, R. A., Capt., R.C.A. 

1939-43 PATERSON, H. B., Gnr., R.A. 

1924-31 PATERSON, H. C, L/S, R.C.N.V.R. 

' 1939-43 PATERSON, N. R., Sgmn., R.C.S. 

1928-32 PATTON, J. M. S., G.C., Capt., R.C.E. 

1929-32 PAVEY, W. G. H., Lieut., Armoured Corps, 

1936-40 PEACOCK, E. F., Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

tl935-38 PEACOCK, J. W. F., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Killed in 
Action). 

1909-12 PEARCE, H. J. L., M.C., Lieut., Canadian 
Forestry Corps. 

1920-29 PEARCE, J. P., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 

1929-33 PEARSON, B. F. C, A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1936-40 PEARSON, H. J. S., Lieut., Calgary High- 
landers. 

1931-33 PECK, H. S., Capt., R.C.A. 

1933-35 PENFIELD, W. G.. Lieut., W/Intell., Can. 
Army. 

1928-32 PENNY, A. E. G., Writer, R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-37 PERLEY-ROBERTSON, A., Lieut, R.C.A. 

1941-43 PHILLIPS, W. M., Cadet, R.C.N. 

1941-43 PHIPPEN, J. G., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1921-25 PHIPPS, N. E., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1930-34 PINCOTT, S. W., P/O, R.C.A.F. 

1927-29 PITCHER, P. B., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1928-29 POPHAM, J. R., Capt.. the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada. 

1929-31 POWELL, R. M., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1931-33 POWELL, W. H., Capt., 4th P.L.D.G. 

1915-18 PREWER, V. H., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1930-32 PRICE, A. S., Captain, R.C.A. 

XVII 



I 



1924-29 PRICE, D. G., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1917-19 PRICE, F. A., O.B.E., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929 PRICE, H. E. C, Major, Royal Can. Regt. 

1918-24 PRICE, H. V., Major, R.C.A.P.C. 

1927-34 RATHBONE, G. H., Captain, R.C.A.S.C. 

1933-36 RAWLINSON, G. L., Lieut., Armoured Corps. 

1916-24 RAY, R. G., Lieut., R.C.E. 

1937-39 RE A, J. K., Lieut., Armoured Corps. 
tl937-39 REDPATH, J. G., P/Q, R.C.A.F. (Killed on 
Active Service). 

1929-33 REDPATH, R. F., Sergt., Victoria Rifles of 
Canada. 

1927-33 REED, L. M., Capt., 5th Infy. Bde. 

1916-19 REES, H. C, Lieut., R.C.A. 

1936-43 REID, I. B., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-30 REID, G. R., Lieut., R.H.L.I. 
.tl934-37 REID, R. M. F., Sergt.-PHot, R.C.A.F. (Miss- 
ing, Presumed Killed in Action). 

1930-34 REID, T. L., Lieut., R.C.E. 

1930-34 REID, W. B., Lieut., 48th Highlanders of Can. 
(Missing) . 

1933-38 RENISON, G. E., Lieut.-Col., 48th. Highlanders 
of Canada. 

1926-29 RENISON, R. J. B., F/L, R.A.F. (Prisoner 
of War) . 

1901-04 RHODES, Sir G. D., K.C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., 
Brig.-Gen., R.E. 

1920-22 RICHARDSON, K. P., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1921-26 RITCHIE, R. A., Capt., R.C.A. 

1938-40 ROBARTS, C. P. S., Gnr., R.C.A. (demobi- 
lized) . 

1928-30 ROBERTS, A. E., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1923-26 ROBERTS, J. P., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1930-36 ROBERTSON, G. R., Capt., Victoria Rifles of 
Canada. 

1936-39 ROBERTSON, J. H., Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

1926-30 ROBERTSON, S. R., Lieut., Q.O.R.C. 

1935-36 ROBINSON, F. C, F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1926-33 ROBSON, E. W., Lieut., Armoured Corps. 

xvm 



+1922-25 ROGERS, E. B., Major, R.C.A. (Killed in 

Action). 
1894-96 ROGERS, G. H., Col., H.Q., Home Guard, Eng. 
1911 ROGERS, H. S., Captain, R.C.A. 

1924-33 ROGERS, J. B., Captain, R.C.E. 
1936-41 ROGERS, J. B., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
1928-32 ROGERS, W. F. B., Lieut., Irish Regiment. 
1927-31 ROPER, P. K., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Prisoner of 

War). 
1943-44 ROSE, J. F., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
1928-31 ROSS, J. K., Capt., 1st. Hussars. 
1935-36 ROSS, J. L. S., Lieut., R.C.E. 
1916-17 ROSS, K. A., E.D., Major, V.T.S., M.D. 1. 
1932-39 ROUGVIE, C. N., Pte., 4th. P.L.D.G. 
1921-28 ROUS, F. H., Lieut., R.C.A. 
1929-30 RUSSEL, A. D., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1926-34 RUSSEL, B. D., D.S.O., D.F.C. and Bar, Wing 

Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 
1924-28 RUSSEL, C. M., Captain, R.C.A. 
1933-39 RUSSEL, H., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing). 
+1931-34 RUSSEL, H. D. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. (Missing, 

presumed Killed in Action). 
1934-39 RUSSEL, O. K. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1935-38 RUSSEL, P. M., Lieut., D.Y.R.C. Hussars. 
1942-44 RUTHERFORD, G. B., 0/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 
1929-32 RYERSON, Y. E. S., Lieut., Royal Regt. of 

Canada (Prisoner of War). 
1915-20 RYRIE, J., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1914-18 RYRIE, R., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
1928-31 SAVAGE, G. C, Major, R.C.A. 
1928-32 SAVAGE, H. B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1937-39 SAVAGE, W. A. W/0 1, R.C.A.F. 
Master SCHAEFER, C, F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1926-30 SCHELL, H. R., Major, Armoured Corps. 
1942-43 SCHELL, P. C, L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
+ 1917-24 SCHOLFIELD, G. P., Major, Royal Regt. of 

Canada (Died of Wounds while Prisoner 

of War) . 
1935-37 SCOTT, G. F., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1932-34 SCOTT, H. J., Capt, R.C.A.M.C. 

XIX 



I 



1919-20 SCOTT, J. G., Major, Royal Rifles of Canada. 

1940-43 SCOTT, K. A. C, P/Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-36 SEAGRAM, C. J., Lieut., 48th. Highlanders of 

Canada. 

1920-26 SEAGRAM, N. O., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1926-34 SEAGRAM, R. D., Lieut., Q.O.R.C. 

1934-39 SEAGRAM, T. B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1940-42 SEARLE, S. A., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1917-19 SHARP, H. McK., Lieut.-Col., Armoured Corps 

1913-14 SHARP, J. McA., Capt., H.Q., 1st. Canadian 

Division. 

1928-31 SHAW, H. V., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. (S.B.) 

1942-43 SHORT, J. W., P/Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1925-27 SILVER, P. D., Capt., R.C.A. 

1937-41 SIMS, P. B., Lieut., Lake Superior Regt. (M). 

1921-24 SLATER, N. D., Captain, R.C.A. 

1935-36 SLEE, J. F., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1940-42 SMITH, A. A. G., Cadet, C.O.T.C. 

1 1917-25 SMITH, A. L., Captain, R.C.A. 

1932-37 SMITH, E. L. G., Captain, R.H.L.I. 

1916-20 SMITH, F. A., Chaplam & Major, 4th. P.L.D.G. 

1933-37 SMITH, G. H., Lieut., Royal Montreal Regt. 

1933-37 SMITH, R. H., Lieut., Royal Montreal Regt. 

1941-44 SMYTHE, J. S., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1941-42 SNEATH, G. R., Mids., R.N.V.R. 

1927-32 SOMERS, D. C, Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1923-28 SOMERS, G. B., Capt., Q.O.R.C. 

1919-20 SOMERS, G. T., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1931-41 SOIvIERVILLE, C. M., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1928-36 SOUTHAM, B. G., Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1926-32 SOUTHAM, F. M., A/Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1927-28 SOUTHAM, J. D., Major, R.C.A. 

1926-29 SOUTHAM, K. G., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

Master SPEECHLY, W. G., Lieut., Royal Winnipeg 

Rifles. 

1937-43 SPEIRS, H. A., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1938-42 SPENCE, R. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1938-39 SPENCER, C. H. A., Lieut., the Irish Regt. of 

Canada. 



XX 



1894-02 SPENCER, C. R., Chaplain & Hon. Major, Can. 

Army. 
1924-30 SPRAGGE, E. W., L/CpL, R.C.O.C. 
1906-11 SPRAGGE, G. W., F/0., R.C.A.F. 
1918-24 SPRAGGE, J. G., D.S.O., O.B.E., Brigadier, 

Q.O.R.C. 
1928-31 SPRAGGE, P. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1940-41 STANGER, E. T., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1931-35 STARNES, J. K., Capt., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1928-29 STAUNTON, S., 
1927-31 STAUNTON, T. A., Capt., Q.O.R.C. 
1930-34 STAUNTON, T. A. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1927-30 STEPHENS, A. K., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1938-44 STEWART, I. C, A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
1927-33 STIKEMAN, W. J. C, Major, the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1924-30 STONE, A. C, Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 
1927-32 STONE, J. R., Sergt., Armoured Corps. 
1934-36 STORMS, D. D., L/Cpl., R.C.E. 
1934-36 STORMS, P. H., Lieut., R.C.A. 
1919-23 STRATHY, C. M. A., Group Capt, R.C.A.F. 
tl929-34 STRATHY, G. H. K., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

(Killed in Action). 
1919-22 STRATHY, J. G. K., E.D., Colonel, Q.O.R.C. 
1922-26 STRATTON, J. W., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 
1910-13 STRATTON, W. W., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A.S.C. 
1 1939-42 STRONG, W. G. M., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (KUled 

on Active Service). 
1897-01 STUART, C. J. S., M.C., Chaplain and Hon. 

Lt.-Col. (demobilized). 
1914-15 SUTCLIFFE, F. M., E.D., Capt., R.C.A. 
1939-42 SUTHERLAND, J. B. I., Cadet, C.O.T.C. 
1938-42 SVENNINGSON, B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1928-32 SWAISLAND, J. W., L/Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
1937-38 SWINTON, W. F., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 
1936-37 SYLVESTER, J. L., Captain, R.C.A. 
1938-43 SYMONS, J. J., A/LA., R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 
1934-41 TATE, C. I. P., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 
1935-39 TAYLOR, E. W., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

XXI 



Master TAYLOR, H. N., Chaplain and S/L, R.C.A.F. 
tl936-38 TAYLOR, J. A. C, Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. 

(Killed in Action). 
1934-35 TAYLOR, P. Y., Lieut.,- U.S. Army Air Corps. 
1926-32 TAYLOR, T. L., Lieut., Royal Regt. of Canada 

(Prisoner of War). 
1940-42 THOMPSON, J. C, Pte., C.P.T.C. 
1921-28 THOMPSON, J. S. D., Lieut., 48th Highlanders 

of Canada. 
1929-32 THOMSON, A. D. D., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1937-39 THOMSON, J. S., D.F.C., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1936-39 THOMSON, W. G., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
1915-19 TORNEY, T. H. F., Major, R.C.A. 
1940-41 TRACY, G. L., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
1930-33 TRENHOLME, T. C, Capt., Royal Montreal 

Regt. 
1922-24 TROW, A. M., Lieut., Q.O.R.C. 
1929-30 TROW, G. H., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1921-23 TROW, J. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1936-39 TURCOT, C. S. E., Lieut., R.C.A. 
1934-38 TURCOT, J. P., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
1918-20 TURNER, A. H., Major, R.C.A. 
1919-21 TURNER, H. R., Major, R.C.A. 
1930-32 TURPIN, G. W. F., Capt., Royal Montreal Regt. 
1923-29 USBORNE, T. H., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
1928-32 VALLANCE, C. G., Lieut., R.H.L.I. 
1936-39 VALLANCE, J. M., Lieut., R.C.O.C. 
1922-25 VAN STRAUBENZEE, C. B., Lieut.-Colonel, 

Armoured Corps. 
1930-34 VAUGHAN, R. P., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1909-13 VERNON, A. A. H., S/L, R.C.A.F. 
1910-11 VIPOND, H. K., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A.P.C. 
1933-35 VIPOND, J. F., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1933-38 VIPOND, J. R., Lieut., Irish Regt. of Canada 

(Missing) . 
+1925-26 VOKES, F. A., Lieut.-Col., Armoured Corps, 

(Killed in Action). 
1921-23 WADDS, G. M., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
1937-40 WALCOT, C. A., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 
1928-34 WALDIE, I. S., Lieut, Q.O.R.C. 

XXII 



1941-44 WALKER, D. A., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 WALLACE, J. A. G., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1934-41 WARBURTON, H. W., Bdr., C.A.T.C. (de- 
mobilized). 

1934-39 WARBURTON, J. A., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1936-41 WARNER, F. H. O., P.O., U.S.N.R. 

1932-38 WARNER, G. D. E., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 

1936-39 WATERS, D. M., Lieut., R.C.N. 

1937-42 WATERS, J. G., Mids., R.C.N. 

1941-43 WHEELER, A. D., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1903-07 WHEELER, Sir E. O., K.C.B., M.C., Legion of 
Honour, Brig.-Gen., R.E. 

1925-26 WHYTE, K. T., Capt. 48th. Highlanders of Can. 

1927-34 WHITEHEAD, R. L. W., U.S. Field Ambulance 
Service. 

1925-26 WHYTE, K. T., Capt. 48th Highlanders of Can. 

1929-34 WIGLE, D. H., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1929-32 WIGLE, F. E., Lieut.-Col., Armoured Corps. 

1 1905-08 WILKES, A. B., Major, R.A.M.C. (Died on 
Active Service). 

1924-31 WILKIE, D. R., Capt., Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1926-30 WILKINSON, A. H., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1942-43 WILKINSON, F. J., A.C.I, R.C.A.F. 

1941-43 WILKINSON, G. L., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1930-33 WILLIAMS, B. S., Lieut., U.S.N.R. 

1911-15 WILLIAMS, E. W., F/0., R.C.A.F. 

1927-31 WILLIAMS, R. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-39 WILLS, W. S., Lieut., R.C.C.S. 

1910-13 WILSON, A. L., Major, R.C.A. 

Master WILSON, D. S., Lieut., Pictou Highlanders. 

1921-24 WILSON, E. C. J., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1905-06 WILSON, J. C, Lt.-Col., R.C.A.M.C. 

1936-39 WILSON, J. W., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1918-21 WILSON, R. B., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1940-44 WISENER, R. A., Cadet, R.C.N. 

1918-24 WISER, J. G., Captain, 4th. P.L.D.G. 

1925-32 WOOD, J. D., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1937-39 WOOD, P. A., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1937-38 WOODSIDE, G. E., Pte., R.C.O.C. 

1927-31 WORRELL, J. C. 

xxin 



1928-32 WORTHINGTON, J. M. W., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
1919-26 WOTHERSPOON, G. D., Lieut.-CoL, Armoured 

Corps. 
1925-31 WOTHERSPOON, R. B., Captain, R.E. 
1930-32 WRIGHT, H. H., Lieut., the Black Watch (R.H. 

R.) of Canada (demobilized). 
1930-32 WRIGHT, W. R., D.S.C., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

(demobilized) . 
Master WYNN, C. N., Lieut., R.N.V.R. 
1940-43 WYNNE, R. F., A.B., R.N.V.R. 



XXIV 



» 



Killed in Action 

Ahislie Power Ardagh (T.C.S. 1922-27) 

Lieut.-Col., B.C. Dragoons. 

John William Frederick Peacock (T.C.S. 1935-38) 

Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Anthony Larratt Smith (T.C.S. 1917-25) 

Captain, R.C.A. 

Killed on Active Service 

WUliam Garnet Matthew Strong (T.C.S. 1939-42) 
L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

"Yet can I not persuade me thou art dead, 
Oh no! for something in thy face did shine 
Above mortaUty that showed thou wast divine." 



^. ^31. f. 



Trinity College School Record 

Vol. 48 Trinity College School, Port Hope, October, 1944 No. 1 

Editor-in-Chief P. C. Dobell 

News Editor S. C. Edmonds 

Literary Editor G. P. Vernon 

Sports Editor E. M. Sinclair 

Feature Editor T. McC. Wade 

Business Manager R. C. Paterson 

Assistants H. French, J. B. French, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, 

A. M. Stewart, H. C. Butterfield, J. H. Caldbick, H. C. D. Cox, 
V. Dawson, W. M. Dobell, J. W. Dobson, F. A. H. Greenwood, 
J. G. Gordon, J. M. Hallward, D. S. Hare, E. D. Hibbard, T. Huxley, 
R. M. Kirkpatrick, T. W. Lawson, J. R. Ligertwood, J. D. McDonough, 
M. F. McDowell, P. H. Mclntyre, W. H. Palmer, G. A. H. Pearson, 
R. W. S. Robertson, R. V. S. Smith, J. R. deC. Warner, R. L. Watts. 

Photography G. C. Bovaird, R. P. Stokes 

Junior School Record Mr. C. J. Tottenham 

Managing Editor Mr. W. K. Molson 

Treasurer Mr. A. H. N. Snelgrove 



The Record is published six times a year, in the months of October, December, 

February, April, June and August. 



EDITORIAL 

As another school year begins, T.C.S. finds herself 
with a larger enrolment than ever before — one hundred 
and ninety-nine boys in the Senior School, seventy-six in 
the Junior — yet ready, as usual, to distribute her many 
benefits upon every conscientious student. Perhaps this 
increase in attendance is indicative of the growing hope 
that victory is on the threshold. With conferences being 
held at Dumbarton Oaks and elsewhere, peace does seem to 
be "just around the corner". The more important con- 
sideration, however, is whether we shall be as successful in 
negotiating the peace as we have been in winning the war. 
Certainly the problem in securing an harmonious interna- 
tional viewpoint common to all countries is the first pre- 
requisite to a peace of any permanence. How are we to 
obtain a unanimity of outlook amongst nations whose char- 
acteristics and ambitions are so very different? 



2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

We are confronted, at T.C.S., with very much the same 
problem on a considerably reduced scale. Can we, with 
the School filled almost to the point of over-flowing, hope 
to preserve harmony throughout the year? Let us decide 
to make this our aim. How, then, are we to achieve this 
unity? Perhaps we should be more inclined to seek it if 
we realize that our success is dependent upon the co- 
operation of all of us. A larger number of boys should 
mean stronger teams and a stronger School, but these ad- 
vantages cannot be expected unless complete accord exists 
between every individual. Without doubt the path of har- 
mony is co-operation. Such a spirit naturally develops 
slowly and it is only by consistent effort that we can hope 
to secure it. 

It would indeed be an achievement if, from this year 
on. all boys who attended the School were imbued with the 
spirit of co-operation. We should then, by our example, 
influence others to adopt the same principle, and in this 
manner co-operation might eventually develop into a Cana- 
dian policy. With one nation practising and spreading 
this doctrine, others would soon follow her lead. Then 
peace would become a more readily accessible goal. 

Such an objective, and the assumption that a small 
entity like ourselves can help reach it, seems like an im- 
possible dream, but surely nothing is too great for us to 
attempt when the peace of the whole world is the prize. 
Furthermore, from a purely local point of view, the School 
would stand to gain much from such a policy. Let us adopt 
"Through Co-operation to Unity" as our watchword for 
this and for ensuing years. 

— P.C.D. 




A. P. ARDAGH ('22-'27) 

Lieut. -Colonel, B.C. Dragoons 

Killed in Action, August 31, 1944. 




A. L. SMITH (' 17-75 ) 

Captain, R.C.A. 

Killed m Action, July 27, 1944. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

IN MEMORIAM 

They walk in the City 

that they have builded, 

The city of God 

from evil shielded. 



A. P. ARDAGH 



Lieut.-Col., B. C. Dragoons 

"Doc" Ardagh he was always known as at School, and 
"Doc" he will always be to his many friends. It is pain- 
fully difficult to believe that "Doc" is not still with us for 
he dropped in for a short time only last June in company 
with his old school friend, Jim Strathy. Both were Colonels 
and the same boyish young men, full of fun, despite all they 
had gone through during the war. 

"Doc" spent five years at the School, from September, 
1922, until June, 1927. He reached the Sixth Form and 
did good work in the top section of it. Not a brilliant 
athlete, he took part in all games and for his size did 
amazingly well. He won his second colours in football, 
Middleside in cricket, and first team colours for Gym. 
"Doc" was always very good in gym. work and he was a 
member of the famous team which won every event in an 
inter-school competition in Toronto. 

School held no terrors for "Doc" and he was able to 
derive some enjoyment out of every experience. He was 
very popular and always ready for a "lark". 

He entered the Royal Military College where he had 
four successful years; afterwards he tried flying for a time, 
and then became a Captain in the Royal Canadian Dra- 
goons. 

In April, 1940, he went overseas as Camp Commandant 
to Major-General Victor Odium, G.O.C., the Second Divi- 
sion. Early in 1941, he was transferred to the Third Bat- 
talion Princess Louise Dragoon Guards. He returned to 
Canada in April, 1942, to attend the Staff College and left 
for overseas again in September. He served as Brigade 



4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Major and then was appointed second-in-command of the 
British Columbia Dragoons. 

Recalled for duty in Ottawa as G.S.O. I in July, 1943, 
he returned overseas at the end of June, 1944, and was 
posted to the Canadian Armoured Corps, in Italy. He was 
killed in action at Fogia on August 31st. 

"Doc" Ardagh was a real Army man and a most 
efficient officer, showing an extraordinary coolness in all 
situations. He was a man's man and won countless friends 
wherever he went. 

He is survived by his widow and small daughter, of 
Quebec, his mother and four sisters of Orillia. To them 
the School extends its deep sympathy in their loss. 



A. L. SMITH 



Captain, R.C.A. 

Those of us who remember Tony Smith when he first 
entered the Junior School in September, 1917, see him so 
clearly as he then was, a delightfully interesting lad, full 
of vivacious enquiry, and always a wave of expression on 
his happy face. He stayed with us for eight years and 
continually he seemed to be the far-from-fixed point around 
which many others moved. 

We see him in the classroom, usually managing to 
make the hours more exhilarating; in the Choir, losing 
himself in the music; up in J.D.'s room, stuffing on buns 
and ginger ale; on the football field, tackling like a fox 
terrier ; in the covered rink, stick handling his way through 
a crowd of players. 

Tony loved to walk in the countryside for adventure, 
collecting apples in forbidden orchards, visiting the river 
during ice-floe time, damming up the creeks and fishing for 
suckers in the Spring. There were always tales of race 
horses in the offing and rumour had it that Tony had 
bought one. 

He reached the fifth form in his final year and was 
appointed a House Captain. Also, he won his first team 
colours in Football and Hockey. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 

After he left he entered business and became a partner 
in the insurance firm of Tomenson, Saunders, Smith and 
Garfat. He was a most skilful horseman and was seldom 
really happy unless he was near a good horse. Tony was 
one of the best polo players in Canada and he often rode 
as a jockey in races. 

He enlisted as a private on the outbreak of war and 
went overseas in 1941 after he had won his commission. 
On his way to Normandy with the invasion forces his ship 
was torpedoed and Tony swam in full equipment over a mile 
to shore. He served in the most dangerous posts as a for- 
ward observation officer directing the fire of his guns, and 
on July 27th. he was kOled by German mortar fire. 

His Commanding Officer calls Tony one of the "unsung 
group of heroes who have probably done more than any 
other group to help win this horrible war. On many 
occasions the second front would have faUed if it hadn't 
been for the guns directed by these brave officers in the 
front line." 

Tony is survived by his widow and small daughter, his 
father, G. Larratt Smith, a brother, Bethune Smith, and 
two sisters, all of Toronto. To them we send our deepest 
sympathy. 



J. W. F. PEACOCK 



Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

John Peacock entered the School ten years ago, in 
September, 1934, and yet it seems but yesterday. From 
the first day he showed himself to be a lad of much pro- 
mise and he well lived up to those expectations. Always 
popular and friendly with other boys, he developed a strong 
character and his example was consistently of the best. 

John was an able and conscientious student and at the 
same time he always performed well at games. For four 
years he played on the first hockey team and his long thin 
figure on the defence was ever a stumbling-block to the 
opposing forwards. He was a good cricketer, winning his 
colours in 1935 and remaining on the team until he left in 



6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

1938. In his final year he was also a member of the first 
football and first squash teams. 

Because of his sound character and leadership ability 
he was made a Senior in 1937 and soon afterwards he was 
appointed a Prefect. 

From T.C.S. he entered McGill University. He was a 
member of the C.O.T.C. and a reserve officer in the Black 
Watch. He joined the R.C.A.F. radio branch as pilot officer 
in September, 1941, and was attached to the R.A.F. over- 
seas in the same year. Later he rejoined the R.C.A.F. as 
a navigator on Beaufighters. 

John had seen much action and always acquitted him- 
self with the utmost skill, calmness and bravery. For his 
outstanding ability and courage he was Mentioned in 
Despatches in 1943. 

On August 7th. his aircraft was on patrol over the 
beachhead when they were suddenly attacked by enemy 
fighters. The tail of John's plane was shot off and they 
were out of control. His pilot, Wing Commander Beveridge, 
gave the order to abandon the aircraft but John could not 
get out of the usual door and self-sacrificingly helped his 
companion to escape from the roof hatch. John was killed 
instantly when the plane crashed. 

His commanding officer speaks of John's qualities of 
"leadership, determination and enthusiasm" and says he 
was the most able navigator in the Wing and had the re- 
sponsibility of training all the other navigators. He was 
most popular with all his fellow officers and highly re- 
spected by everyone. 

John Peacock is another of those exceptionally fine 
young men whose loss is a terrible blow, but whose sacri- 
fice and heroism will save the world for the young and 
unborn. 

To Major and Mrs. F. A. Peacock and their second son, 
Ted, we send our deep sympathy. 



(We are privileged to publish the following extracts 
from a letter received by John's parents from his com- 
manding officer) : 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 7 

"I cannot express in full the deep regret that my entire 
Squadron feel at this moment. I speak with particular 
feeling since I was with John until the last moment and it 
was he who saved my life by pushing me free from the 
aircraft, as we came down out of control. 

"We were on patrol over the Beach Head during the 
early hours of August 7th when we were suddenly attack- 
ed by fighters. John gave me the warning as they at- 
tacked; but before I could take avoiding action, we had 
been hit and were out of control — our tail had been cut off. 
We immediately set about getting clear of the aircraft in 
the conventional manner which is out of the side. Apparent- 
ly John was having difficulty, for when I asked him what 
was wrong, he only replied that he couldn't jettison the 
door. Accordingly I immediately jettisoned the hatch in 
the roof directly over my head and tried to get clear; how- 
ever, I found myself stuck half -in-half-out at the last 
minute, not being able to clear myself through my own 
efforts. I suddenly came clear. The only explanation I can 
give is that John, unable to get his hatch open, decided that 
one of us at least should get out and came to my rescue, 
unselfishly abandoning hope for himself, and pushed me 
from behind. My parachute opened just in time, as I hit 
the ground a minute later. Thus John had no time to fol- 
low me, and was killed instantly when the aircraft crashed, 
about fifteen yards from me. 

"Fortunately, the incident occurred within our own 
lines. The following morning of August 8th, the funeral 
was held at the Canadian Cemetery, at Beny-sur-Mer, near 
Courcelles. 

"John was without a doubt our most able navigator, 
and consequently had the responsibility of looking after 
the training of all our navigators — a job which he carried 
out with extreme efficiency. Not only was he highly re- 
spected for his knowledge and ability, but for his personal 
qualities of leadership and the determination and en- 
thusiasm he displayed on operations. He was most popu- 
lar with everybody he came in contact with and I have had 
many calls since I have returned to this country from peo- 
ple expressing their regret when they read the report". 



8 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

W. G. M. STRONG 
L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

Bill Strong came to T.C.S. in September, 1939, from 
Selwyn House, and he left in June, 1942, to enter McGill 
University. 

During those three brief years we came to know Bill 
well, some of us came to know him very well, and he in his 
turn made many close friends. Bill was not by nature an 
easy mixer; he did not wear his heart on his sleeve, but on 
the contrary he had a reserve and hesitancy in his manner 
which sometimes made people feel he was aloof, when in 
reality it was merely an expression of his shyness, his 
modesty, and natural dignity. 

He moved easUy through the School, completing his 
Middle School in June, 1941, and his Upper School in 1942. 
Bill worked in spasms, but he wrestled in a puzzled fashion 
with any difficulties and usually he conquered them. 

In his final year, he played on the first football team 
and was one of the best skiers in the School ; his enthusiasm 
for skiing could not be dampened and he was a strong con- 
tender in many open events, notably the Taschereau runs 
in Quebec. 

Because of his general leadership ability as well as his 
dependability he was made a Senior and he performed his 
duties faithfully and well. 

In September, 1942, he entered the engineering course 
at McGill and became a member of the Kappa Alpha fra- 
ternity. 

In February, 1943, he enlisted in the Air Force and 
received his elementary training in Ontario and the West. 
He was selected for a pilot and was completing his train- 
ing at Uplands when his aircraft crashed on September 6th. 
near Montebello, killing him instantly. 

Bill was a young man of deep thoughts; he had a 
strong religious nature and he sometimes gave voice to 
his inmost feelings through the medium of verse. We print 
below two of his more recent poems. 

Bill's loss is a bitter one; he still seems a boy with most 
of life before him and that is the way we shall constantly 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 

remember him. Our deep sympathy goes out to his Father, 
and Mother, Colonel and Mrs. Garnet Strong, and his 
sister, all of Montreal. 



TO THOSE WHO DIED 



When I regard the landscape spread below: 
The Cross for those who died that we be free 
To live the life we love to live, and see 
The summer's green, and winter's fields of snow, 
I think of men who left loved homes to go 
To distant countries, where they would not see 
A flower, or bird perched singing in a tree, 
But lead, hot steel and cordite of the foe. 
That Cross, the symbol of the fallen dead, 
Is also symbol of the One they led 
Through city walls to Calv'ry's green-clad hill. 
And hanging there, the Prophets' will fulfill ; 
His cross stood high, with thieves on either side. 
And in the arms of God, his Father, died. 

— W. G. M. strong (June, 1942) 



ON THE DEATH OF MY GRANDMOTHER 

A thousand times have I looked up to thee, 
And in those bright grey eyes, your life I'd see; 
Your childhood spent in Scotland's rugged hUls. 
The mere thought of it lifts my head, and swells 
My heart and soul with pride ne'er told by me 
To friend, nor relative — because 'tis we 
Who for thy love and honoured memory. 
Cause heaven and earth, the ocean and the sea 
To sound and then re-somid, with noise that fiUs 
Our ears and grief-numbed brains, with tolling bells. 

* * * * * 
"A life is gone", that ringing seems to say, 
Yet when I think of you, life's winding way 
Of death and sorrows, sickness and of play 
Seems straight and wide and beautiful as day. 

— W. G. M. strong (July, 1942) 



10 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




CHAPELlHiNOTES 



The services this year are being conducted at the 
same times as in previous years. A fifteen minute service 
is held each week-day evening at which senior boys read 
the lessons. On Sundays there is a celebration of Holy 
Communion before breakfast, Matins at 9.45, and Even- 
song at 5.15, when a sermon is delivered. On the first Sun- 
day in each month, a corporate Choral Eucharist is cele- 
brated. 

The Chapel is being looked after by an able group of 
Sacristans headed by Hare, while most of its decoration 
and fine appearance should be credited to Miss Smith and 
the masters' wives. 



Choir Notes 

The year 1943-44 was one of the most successful for 
some time. Of great assistance was the need for fewer 
changes in the Choir at the start. 

The first event of note, the Carol Service, maintained 
a high standard, in spite of the distracting behaviour of the 
organ, and, nothing daunted, the Choristers carried on with 
fortitude, carrying the Service to a successful conclusion. 

One Sunday in June, the Choir occupied the choir 
stalls for Evensong at St. John's Church. There, to a 
capacity congregation, in a building with excellent acoustics 
and a fine organ to support them they gave a splendid per- 
formance. The rendering of Mendelssohn's "Hear my 
prayer", "And the Glory of the Lord" and the Hallelujah 




J. W. F. PEACOCK ('35-'38) 

Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 
Killed in Action, Augmt 7, 1944. 




L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

W. G. M. STRONG ('39-'42) 

Killed oil Active Service, September 6, 1944. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD H 

Chorus from Handel's "Messiah" received much favourable 
comment. 

For the second year in succession the Head Prefect 
was a member of the Choir. Parker started his choir con- 
nection in the Junior School and was always a valuable and 
cheerful member of the Tenor Section, as were Beament 
and Keyes, also ex-J.S. Britton, too, was of that vintage 
and a consistently useful Bass. Such old friends are sore- 
ly missed. Other strong supporters were Curtis, Cawley, 
Mathewson, Sutherland and Snelgrove. 

This year the Choir has made a most promising start 
with more than sufficient volunteers to fill the vacancies. 
It is much regretted that the limited space in the stalls 
prevent their acceptance. 

There is an entirely new Tenor Section, with the 
exception of Irwin and Evans, and we welcome Long, Wil- 
son i, Goering, Drew and Caldbick. Returning Basses are 
Huycke, Butterfield i, Matthews and Hope, and to these 
have been added Gordon, Robson, Palmer, Gibson i and 
Taylor i. 

Of the Altos, Watts, Gill and Paterson ii have tem- 
porarily departed for vocal readjustment, and they have 
been replaced by Morris, Deverall and Scott ii. Dawson ii 
has returned to England. There have been few changes in 
the Junior School Trebles and it is hoped that none will be 
necessary for some time. 

A well deserved tribute is due to all the Choir boys of 
last year who gave up more of their spare time than is 
usual to achieve such happy and satisfactory results. A 
special tribute should go to Mr. Cohu who so consistently 
strives for and achieves results of high calibre. 



The Underlying Element of Faith 

The first sermon of the school year was delivered on 
Sunday, September 17, by our new Chaplain, the Rev. E. 
R. Bagley. He explained what he considered to be the 
underlying element in his faith — that there is more to re- 
ligion than behaviour. He warned us against the popular 



12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

school-boy conception that a "good chap" is automatically 
a good Christian. This is a mistake, because Christ's 
standards are higher than those of the "decent sort". The 
"good chap" often tends to become too self-reliant and 
accordingly overlooks a fundamental factor in Christianity 
— the grace of God. He does not realize the need for 
prayer and he has no one to turn to. The Chaplain con- 
cluded by assuring us that God will always assist those who 
believe in Him. 



An Address by the Headmaster 

The Headmaster gave an address in Chapel on Sunday, 
September 24. He spoke of the adventure of life, the new 
experiences on which we are embarking in this school year, 
experiences which added up will have a real bearing on our 
future. "The life of the present, of to-day, lived earnestly, 
intently" says Sir William Osier, "is the only insurance for 
the future." And that is only another way of repeating 
the advice Jesus gave — "take no thought for the morrow", 
do not worry, but rely on God. "To-day well lived makes 
every yesterday a dream of happiness, and every to-mor- 
row a vision of hope. Look well, therefore, to this day." 

You are every day becoming more and more you, your- 
self, a character, a real person, and the type of person you 
become depends very largely on the thoughts you have, the 
acts you commit, the habits you form. Self-confidence 
and self-reliance spring from the knowledge that you have 
the innate ability to master all your difficulties and that 
the great source of strength, God, stands ready to help you 
at all times. But remember the parable of the talents and 
use your gifts, day by day. "Gird up your loins, and let 
your lamps be shining". 

In these Chapel services we fmd the way clearly mark- 
ed on the map of life; we may stray, most people do, but 
always we can find our way back again and keep to our 
course more faithfully. "Be still then and know that I am 
God." In Kipling's story the wisest of the Gods hid man's 
Godhead 'where man will never dream of looking for it, in- 
side man himself.' The Kingdom of God is within you. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 

and the great Christian adventure is to deepen and ex- 
pand and clarify the God-given qualities of Truth, Beauty 
and Righteousness, leading others along the King's High- 
way. 

Let your example, in this School, so shine before other 
members of the School that they may see your good works 
and glorify your Father which is in heaven. 



Harvest Festival 

The annual Harvest Festival service was held on Octo- 
ber 1, and the Chaplain delivered the sermon. He chose 
as his text "Give us this day our daily bread" and, explain- 
ing the significance behind such a casual phrase, pointed 
out that "bread" implies the co-operation between man and 
God. The powers of God and the toil of man combined 
make the production of the bread possible. The insigni- 
ficant little men, who never make the headlines, are the in- 
struments of the Almighty. Every creative effort, the 
Chaplain stressed, is working with Him. "Everything de- 
pends on God, and He depends on us." Therefore the 
Harvest Festival should be aptly regarded as the climax 
of the year. 



Choir's Visit to Perrytown 

On Sunday evening, October 1, the Choir went to 
Perrytown to sing Evensong at the Harvest Festival ser- 
vice. Owing to the absence of Mr. Cohu, John Irwin play- 
ed the organ. The Choir sang the anthem, "Ring Ye Bells 
of Joy and Praise", and their whole performance has been 
spoken of in glowing terms. 



God, the Lord of the Whole Earth 

On Sunday, October 8, the Chaplain preached the ser- 
mon. He chose as his text, "Are ye not as the children of 
the Ethiopians unto me, O Children of Israel?" 

He warned us against the tendency, which is at its 
height in wartime, of thinking of God as though he be- 



14 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

longed to us exclusively. We must realize that God is the 
Lord of the whole earth, in whose sight each nation has 
its own standing or destiny; otherwise we will revert to 
the ancient habit of regarding our Lord as a tribal deity, 
with whom it was customary to make covenants. How- 
ever, it is extremely doubtful that any "favoured-nation 
clause" could be found in these covenants. The Chaplain 
went on to say that we must turn again to God — not a God 
who is concerned primarily with our efforts, but a God 
whose infinite wisdom, justice and redemptive mercy can 
set men free from their own inevitable destruction. 



The Church of the Holy Trinity 

On Sunday, October 15, the Rev. John Frank spoke in 
Chapel and related the very interesting history of Holy 
Trinity Church, one of the oldest in Toronto, of which 
he is rector. He told us how an anonymous gift of £5,000 
had enabled Bishop Strachan to build Holy Trinity about 
the year 1845. One of the conditions of the gift was that 
the seats should always be free. However, the story that 
it was the donation of two ladies, who, while travelling 
through Upper Canada, had been turned out of one of the 
rented pews in St. James' Cathedral, is not correct. Actual- 
ly the gift was contained in the will of the wife of a York- 
shire clergyman. 

From its dedication in 1847, Holy Trinity has always 
been a pioneer in church matters. It was the first Toronto 
church to have candles on the altar and to have a Choral 
Eucharist. To-day, its programme for the transient im- 
employed is the first of its kind, and its annual Nativity 
play. "The Christmas Story", which was brought over from 
England six years ago, has gained much notice. 

Mr. Frank closed with the hope that as Holy Trinity 
approaches its one hundredth birthday, its relations with 
T.C.S. would be as strong as they had been in the past. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 

Church Parade 

On Sunday, October 22, the Cadet Corps took part in 
the morning service at St. Mark's Church, later joining 
other units in the Victory Loan Parade which culminated 
in a short service of Dedication to Victory in the Town Hall 
Park. 

The service was conducted by the Rector, the Rev. T. 
P. Crothwait ('17-'20), and the sermon was preached by 
the Rt. Rev. R. J. Renison ('86-'92), Lord Bishop of Moo- 
sonee. After the service, the Squadron marched with other 
units to the Town Hall, where two hymns were sung, 
prayers were said and speeches were made. After the 
pennant of the Seventh Victory Loan had been raised, the 
units moved off independently. 

The Cadet Corps put on a very fine showing, consider- 
ing that it was the first parade of the year, and the band 
deserves special praise. 



The Lord Is My Shepherd 

On Sunday, October 22, the School was privileged to 
have the Rt. Rev. R. J. Renison, ('86-'92), Lord Bishop of 
Moosonee, and a former Head Boy of the School, preach 
at Evensong in the Chapel. 

For his text he chose the opening of the twenty-third 
Psalm: "The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want". He 
told us that this was possibly the most popular and best 
known poem in the world. It has been translated into 
every language, and has probably had more influence, at 
least in the Christian world, than any other bit of poetry. 
The Bishop went on to say that he had often wondered 
how that psalm had come to be written, and in explana- 
tion gave us a picture of the early life of David. In his 
youth David was mostly occupied with the keeping of his 
father's sheep. He had to lead them into the pastures and 
to the streams, and he had to guard them from wolves and 
other wild animals. Does not God do the same for us? 
He cares for us, feeds us, guards us, and comforts us. 



16 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



NOTtS k 



p. /w 




Gifts to the School 

We wish to acknowledge, with deep thanks, the fol- 
lowing gifts to the School: — 

Cricket pads and bats from Lieut. David Knapp; 

Athletic clothing from Flight Lieut. Ralph Johnson 
and A.C.2 E. M. Parker; 

Magazines and booklets from L. L. McMurray; 

A book of records. "The Grand Canyon Suite", from 
J. W. Kerr; 

Books for the Library from Mrs. Ewart Britton and 
H. C. Wotherspoon; 

Four large, heavy, woollen blankets in School colours 
for the use of the Football Team, from Sub-Lieutenant Jim 
Short. 



The George Percival Scholfield Memorial 

During the summer a stone tablet in memory of George 
Scholfield was placed in the wall of the cloisters leading 
from the Hall to the Classroom Building. It is in the 
form of a plaque with the sculptured likeness of George's 
head at the top and an inscription underneath. The sculp- 
tor was Miss Florence Wyle of Toronto, and she has cap- 
tured an expression of George's which his friends well re- 
member. 

At the bottom of the tablet is a stone basin with a 
drinking fountain. 

The tablet has been much admired by many people; 
we are deeply indebted again to Mrs. Scholfield and we feel 
it is a very special privilege to have such a memorial of 
one of our finest Old Boys. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 

Honour Matriculation 

The School has again won many honours in the Upper 
School or Honour Matriculation examinations. 

A. E. Millward, Head Boy, lead all candidates for ad- 
mission to the University of Toronto and won more Scholar- 
ships than any candidate we can recall. 

Millward has been a consistently brilliant student ever 
since he entered the Junior School as the winner of an Old 
Boys' Scholarship in September, 1939. He worked steadily 
and conscientiously and proved himself to be a real student 
by the way he applied himself. He deserves to the utmost 
all the honour and praise he has won, and we wish him 
continued success at the University. 

J. B. S. Southey won the Richardson Memorial Scho- 
larship at Queen's. 

T.C.S. boys have now won no less than forty-six Uni- 
versity Scholarships in the past nine years. 
The details of the results follow: — 

Upper School Results, 1944 

No. of Candidates 46 

Papers attempted 326 

Papers passed 295 

Papers failed ; 31 

% passes 91.1 

% failures 8.9 

1st class honours 102 31.2% 

2nd class honours 64 19.6% 

3rd class honours 43 13.1% 

Credits 88 26.9% 

Total Honours 209 64.4% 

33 out of 46 candidates passed every paper. 
6 candidates had 24 failures. 

Boys who won five or more firsts: — 

Millward 10 firsts; 1 second; 

MacLaren 7 " 2 " 

Beament 6 " 2 " 1 third; 

Dobell 6 " 3 " 

Saunderson 6 " 1 " 2 " 



18 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Southey 6 " 3 " 1 credit 

Curtis 5 " 3 " 1 " 

Wigle 5 " 2 " 1 " 



Middle School Results, 1944 

No. of Candidates 122 

Papers attempted 505 

Papers passed 414 82% 

Papers failed 91 18% 

1st class honours 89 

2nd class honours 99 

3rd class honours 82 

Credits 144 

Total honours 270 

% honours 53.4 



Our congratulations go to Mr Scott who achieved the 
rare distinction of seeing every boy in his Algebra class 
obtain first class honours in the departmental examination. 



Millward's Scholarships 

A. E. Millward, Head Boy at T.C.S. in June, 1944, has 

been awarded the following Scholarships on his Upper 
School Examinations: 

By the University of Toronto Value 

The Prince of Wales for standing highest of 

all candidates in any nine papers $ 50.00 

The Edward Blake in Modem Languages 500.00 

The 1st. Mary Mulock in Greek and Latin 300.00 

By Trinity College 

The Wellington in Greek and Latin 760.00 

The F. A. Bethune in Greek and Latin 100.00 

The Dickson in Modern Languages 750.00 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 

The Dickson in English, French, History, 

Latin 750.00 

The Bishop Strachan in English, French, 

Greek, Latin 600.00 



$3,810.00 



Millward may hold the Prince of Wales, the Edward 
Blake, the Wellington and the Bethune; the others go by 
reversion to the next candidate in the running. 



Royal Canadian Naval College 

This year we are again proud to report that all our 
candidates for entry into the Royal Canadian Naval Col- 
lege were successful, upholding an unbroken record. 

Bob Wisener came third in the final selection, and John 
Fisher came ninth. Our congratulations go to these, and 
to Philip Banister and George Fulford who stood twenty- 
eighth and sixtieth. 

We were sorry to hear that Jim Paterson, who stood 
second in last year's examinations, and third in the final 
selection, had been honourably discharged due to ill health, 
he has joined the British Overseas Airways Corporation. 
Our congratulations to David Common who has been ap- 
pointed a Cadet Captain. The other two successful candi- 
dates from last year, Mike Phillips and Peter Lawson are 
both doing very well. 



A Letter from the Oovemor General 

On Speech Day last June, His Excellency, the Earl of 
Athlone, said in part: "I must confess that when I was 
here before, I was a little disappointed that I didn't get a 
prize. So I suspect that I shall not get a prize this time 

either I have attended many prize givings without 

ever gaining a prize". His Excellency went on to express 
his sympathy for the boys who found themselves in a 
similar predicament. 

During the summer, a prize was forwarded to Grovem- 



20 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

ment House in the form of a small sterling silver cup, made 
in England, suitably engraved to commemorate His Excel- 
lency's visit. The following letter has been received: 

Government House, Ottawa, 17th. October, 1944. 

"I am most grateful to the boys of Trinity College 
School for so kindly sending me such a delightful present. 
I found it waiting for me when I returned from Eastern 
Canada and was deeply touched by their generous thoughts. 

"Would you kindly convey my thanks to all the boys 
and tell them how much I appreciate my Consolation 
Prize!" 



Summer Jobs 

During the summer of this fifth year of war, boys from 
T.C.S. contributed in no small degree to the country's ever- 
increasing war effort. Some worked in the fields, some 
laboured in the sweltering heat of department stores or 
offices, some spent long hours in factories or manufacturing 
concerns, some few turned their hands to lumbering, while 
many were counsellors in boys' camps. But, whether they 
have returned to T.C.S. this year or have gone in further 
pursuit of their careers, they have gained the experience 
not only of their individual jobs but of learning how our 
fellow Canadians live. 

* • • • • 

Warner had perhaps one of the most interesting of the 
summer jobs, that of working for two months as a hos- 
pital attendant in the Marcy State Hospital for the mentally 
ill. He was in charge of a ward into which came all the 
new patients, and which was commonly referred to as "the 
suicide ward". He tells us that it was very absorbing 
work, especially the examinations of the patients. He re- 
veals that sometimes he and the other attendants had to 
resort to the straight- jacket! 

David Grier also did medical work in the X-ray de- 
partment of the Evanston Hospital. He tells us that it 
was an extremely interesting job, photographing bone 
pinnings, etc., in the operating room, and he hopes it will 
help him in his future career as a doctor. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 21 

Baker joined the Merchant Navy in Vancouver and 
made several trips up and down the West Coast. He also 
made voyages to Alaska and to such ports as Skagway, 
Prince Rupert and Wrangel. 

Langdon, one of our new boys, worked for the Hol- 
linger Gk)ld Mines, doing exploratory work known as geo- 
physics. He tells us that by means of very complicated 
and intricate instruments they collected many seemingly 
useless figures, which, when transferred to a graph, indi- 
cated the positions of deposits of copper. 

Many of our boys worked on farms of all types during 
the summer, some on farms of their own choosing, others 
under the Ontario Farm Service Force. Besides these, 
some worked as counsellors in boys' summer camps, gain- 
ing much valuable experience, and helping to look after 
our younger members. Some few of our boys journeyed 
to the Austin lumber mills at Chapleau, Ontario. That 
was hard work, but each year those boys who go there 
come back saying how much they liked it. 

Thus, in many and varied fields of endeavour, boys 
from T.C.S. helped for a few short months to step up our 
coimtry's production of both foodstuffs and armaments, 
increasing the rush of the spring tide of manufactured 
goods that will eventually carry us over the dykes of war 
and into the plain of prosperity. 



Staff Changes 

Two masters have left us this year. Mr. Jarvis has 
returned to Toronto where he is now a member of the 
Upper Canada College staff; and the Rev. E. M. Dann, our 
Chaplain for the past three years, has taken on the duties 
of assistant to the rector of St. John the Evangelist in 
Montreal. We are extremely sorry to see them go and 
wish them the best of luck in their new work. 

• • • • • 

We are indeed fortunate in acquiring the services of 
Mr. G. R. Gwynne-Timothy, the Rev. E. R. Bagley, and Mr. 
P. H. J. Meyer. 



22 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Squadron Leader Gwynne-Timothy comes to us from 
the R.C.A.F. station at Mountain View, and he formerly 
taught school in Windsor, Winnipeg and Toronto. 

Mr. Bagley represents the west on our teaching staff, 
having been chaplain as well as teacher at St. John's Col- 
lege, Winnipeg, where he was also associated with the 
cathedral for some time. 

Mr. Meyer has come to T.C.S. from McGill University 
and is teaching languages at the School until he continues 
his course of study at Harvard. 

We bid our three new masters welcome and hope that 
their stay will be long and pleasant. 



The Library 

The academic year 1943-44 brought a marked decline 
in the circulation of books in the Library. Until last year 
the number of books charged out had shown a steady in- 
crease since 1938, when records were first kept. The re- 
duction was from an average of 27.5 books per student in 
1942-43 to one of 15.5 last year. 

This decline may be accounted for to some extent by 
the fact that many of our students from England, who 
constitute as a group the most extensive readers, have 
either returned home or gone on to university. There has 
also been a noticeable trend towards doing certain types of 
work in the reading room instead of charging out the books 
required for references. 

During the year, 343 volumes were added to the 
Library, largely again through the thoughtfulness of our 
friends, among whom were R. A. R. Dewar, J. A. Paterson, 
R. W. S. Robertson, Major D. K. Parr, P/O J. H. B. Dodd, 
F/0 D. G. Partridge, J. N. Dalley, Esq., P. A. K. Giles, Col. 
and Mrs. F. P. Mackie, Baron Silvercruys, G. D. Kirk- 
patrick, Esq.. A. Speirs, W. D. MacCallan, Dr. E. N. Mor- 
gan, D. G. O. Carmichael, R.N.V.R., J. R. del Rio, Pte. R. 
E. S. Morgan, A. McN. Austin, Esq., D. A. Campbell, Colin 
Scott, H. C. Wotherspoon. Esq. 

May we take this opportunity of thanking them again 
for their kindness and of assuring them that their help 
in building up the Library means a great deal to us. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 23 

Any summary of the year would be incomplete with- 
out reference to the devotion of the Head Librarian, A. E. 
Millward. It would have been quite impossible to carry on 
without his constant and cheerful assistance. 



Cadet Camp 

Ten boys from T.C.S. attended the Cadet Camp al 
Connaught Ranges during the first week and a half of July. 
They formed Company B, combined with Brockville, Lind- 
say and Glebe Collegiates. The greater part of each day 
was spent in attending Military Studies Classes, where the 
boys were instructed in fieldcraft, woodcraft, and in the 
care and use of various weapons. After supper there were 
sports and later a movie was generally shown in the re- 
creation hall. Our Cadets, due to their excellent training 
on the rifle range, gained the highest average score in 
shooting. Our instructor, Lieut. S. J. Batt, was in charge 
of the range. The boys who attended the camp were 
Bovey, Fulford, McLaughlin, Stanger, Campbell i., Robert- 
son, Hyde, Dawson ii, McDowell i. and Henshaw. We ex- 
tend our congratulations to these boys for their success 
and hope that in the future T.C.S. will be represented by 
a larger number of Cadets. 



Military Studies 

For the fourth year, the School is conducting a variety 
of classes in Military Studies, designed to give boys a 
liberal, yet not too technical knowledge of military re- 
quirements. Our scheme is modified from last year in 
order to fit in more closely with the syllabus of Royal 
Canadian Army Cadets. Proficiency in the various sub- 
jects is recorded by chevrons to be worn on the uniform. 
Boys who complete the course should be qualified for First 
Class Cadets (5 chevrons) and, with camp experience, the 
Master Cadet Badge. 



24 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

New Boys* Picnic 

On Sunday, September 24, the Headmaster wedged 
some fifteen new boys from the Hospital, the Lodge dormi- 
tory, and the Cottage into two cars and packed them off 
to a secluded glen near the Ski Camp. Rather unusual was 
the fact that the lads did not have to work for their limch. 
A very sumptuous meal, cooked by the Headmaster, was 
followed by games of touch rugby, softball, and the like, 
while a few ambitious boys summoned up the energy to 
hike across to the Ski Camp itself. To the Headmaster 
and his helpers many thanks are due for a very pleasant 
day. 



Music Hours 

Only one music hour has been held so far this year, 
but it was very well attended. The programme varied 
from "Deep River", sung by Marian Anderson, to the 
"Silken Hour Overture" by Rossini. Schubert's "Unfinished 
Symphony" was the featured work, and the hour was 
brought to a successful conclusion by a rousing rendition 
of the "1812 Overture" by Tschaikowsky. 

It is hoped that future attendance will be even greater. 
Every effort is being made to arrange the programme in 
such a way that those who are unfamiliar, but eager to be- 
come acquainted, with the masterpieces of music may 
derive the maximum benefit from the music hours. 



Music Appreciation 

The music appreciation classes, under the spirited 
direction of Mr. Dolin, are well under way. Works of the 
old masters such as Byrd and Palestrina have been played, 
together with the music of Mendelssohn and the decidedly 
modem "Classical Symphony" by Prokofiev. A biographical 
sketch of each composer is given, the work is then analysed, 
and finally the records are played, thus enabling the lis- 
tener to grasp a better understanding of the subject. Each 
week a different composer and his works are dealt with, 
and Tuesday night classes are eagerly awaited by all mem- 
bers. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 25 

Visit of Dr. Nickel 

A surprise visit was paid the School by Dr. Nickel of 
the Walt Disney Studios, Hollywood. Dr. Nickel has been 
in charge of many of the well known sound effects heard 
in Disney films, notably the whistling in "Snow White", in 
which many of the tunes were his own compositions. He 
whistled many tunes for us, including some of his own, but 
the highlight of the evening was his presentation of bird 
calls of all types. He told us some interesting facts about 
whistling and the School participated in a mass "whistle". 
All in all, the evening was very enjoyably and refreshingly 
spent, and we hope to see Dr. Nickel again in the future, 
perhaps to hear some of his "pupils" at work. 



OtheUo 

On Tuesday, September 26, a number of senior boys 
motored to Toronto for the second performance of "Ot- 
hello" with Paul Robeson in the title role. It was a splen- 
did opportunity to witness one of Shakespeare's finest 
dramas, enacted by a very distinguished cast. We hope 
that such good fortune will favour us again. 



Visit of Brigadier Wyman 

On Thursday, October 5, the School received an un- 
expected yet welcome visit from Brigadier W. Wyman, who 
was in command of the First Canadian Armoured Division 
in France at the break-through near Falaise. 

Prevailed upon to say a few words in the Hall, he told 
us some of his experiences in Sicily, Italy and France. He 
added that wherever he had come into contact with T.C.S. 
Old Boys in the forces he had always found them to be 
brave and reliable soldiers. We wish to thank Brigadier 
Wyman and to wish him a speedy recovery from his 
wounds. 



26 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

The Old Boys' Week-end 

For three hectic days the smell of cigarettes was 
everywhere, hands were sore from clapping and hand- 
shaking, and the masters all wore perpetual smiles, as 
Thanksgiving week-end, 1944, saw the return of almost 
thirty Old Boys. These included many of last year's first 
football squad, who were determined to show the young- 
sters their places in the Annual Football Match. We have 
enjoyed a constant stream of visitors this term from Old 
Boys and former masters, mention of which is made in the 
Old Boys' section. 



Half Holiday 

The School was granted a half holiday on Friday, 
October 13, in honour of the academic successes of A. E. 
Millward, last year's Head Boy. The soccer team and 
Middleside football found the afternoon convenient to hold 
last minute practices before their games on Saturday. 
Other mention of Millward's awards appear elsewhere in 
this issue. 



Scholarships 

Three scholarships were won by boys coming to T.C.S. 
These were the Special Memorial Scholarship, won by G. B. 
Taylor, and the two Memorial Scholarships won by J. D. 
Prentice and K. W. Newcomb. J. P. Williamson won a 
Memorial Scholarship from the Junior School to the Senior. 



We wish to apologize for the following errors which 
appeared in the Prize List (page forty) of the August, 1944, 
issue of the "Record". The following are the corrected 
versions : 

The Rous Cup for the best Novice Boxer C. G. Paterson 

The W. W. Jones Cup for the 220 yds Junior W. M. Dobell 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 27 

BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES 

PARKER, E. M.— Winner of the Bronze Medal, Grand Chal- 
lenge Cup for All-Round Athletics on Bigside, the Jack 
Maynard Memorial Award, the Kerr Trophy, the E. L. 
Curry Cup, Bradburn Cup for the best boxer, and the 
Choir Prize, "Pose", our last year's Head Prefect, had 
his hands full on Speech Day. His remarkable versatility 
made him a leading figure in all branches of School life, 
and this was especially the case in athletics. Here, he 
was captain of the football and hockey teams, winner of 
a distinction cap in the former, vice-captain of the gym. 
team, and a stalwart on the first cricket team, as well as 
being the winner of the above trophies. He was a truly 
great athlete, and was particularly gifted as a- leader on 
the playing fields. The same gift made him an excellent 
Head Prefect, where his industry, courtesy, and integrity 
unquestionably merited the Bronze Medal. To top it off, 
"Mort" was "one of the boys" and a most popular mem- 
ber of the School, with a passion for "cokes", food of 
any kind, and swing music. Quite amazing, too, was the 
number of week-ends "Pose" spent in Toronto! Few 
boys have done as much for the School, and none deserve 
our best wishes more than A.C.2 Ted Parker, R.C.A.F. 



MILLWARD, A. E. — Head Boy extraordinaire, Millward 
entered our Junior School with no training in Latin 
whatsoever. With scholastic determination, for which 
he became renowned at T.C.S., "Doggie" succeeded in 
mastering the complete Latin course in short order. After 
the entire J.S. library had been perused, he moved on 
to the Senior School, searching for further fields to con- 
quer. Completely ignoring his examination results (he 
always neglected to read the notice board when month's 
marks were posted) Millward completed his Middle 
School with the breath-taking average of ninety-five per- 
cent. In his Senior matric, owing to a strange twist 
of fate, he received mere Second Class Honours in Eng- 
lish Composition, while gaining First Class Honours in 



28 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

ten other papers. Out of class his record was enviable, 
for, although he only dabbled in sports, "Doggie" found 
time for many extra-curricular activities. Besides being 
Secretary, and later President, of the Political Science 
Club, he occupied the position of Chairman of the De- 
bates Committee, as well as being one of the most energe- 
tic of School Librarians. Nevertheless, Millward did not 
stop short of his ultimate goal. When he left, he occu- 
pied the highest academic position at T.C.S., that of Head 
Boy, and as a result of winning eight University of 
Toronto Scholarships, including the Prince of Wales for 
leading all other candidates, he became one of the most 
brilliant students to enter Trinity College. This is truly 
scholastic achievement at its height. Venit, Vidit, Vicit. 



BRITTON, P. E. — Port Hope's pride and joy stepped into 
Bethune House after a successful stay in the Junior 
School. He became popular from the start. A stand- 
out on last year's Bigside, Pete unfortunately broke his 
collar-bone in the Ridley game — a game he had been 
waiting seven years to play. As Vice-captain of hockey 
for two years and a member of the First cricket team, 
he gained wide renown and respect as an athlete. He 
was also a Choir member of long standing who never 
enjoyed himself more than when teasing Mr. Cohu. For 
his consistent work as Head Sacristan and second Pre- 
fect, he was awarded a special medal for Loyalty and 
Co-operation on Speech Day. Of a fighting nature, 
"Ewart" carried on a long, drawn-out battle with "Bon- 
ham" Southey in an effort to gain the "bigtime" cro- 
quinole championship of the Study. Pete was never the 
same after "Knobby" left, but we hope that some young 
female will restore him to his former spirits. Good luck, 
Pete, at Varsity! 



HOLTON, J. M.— In his only year in the J.S., "Granny" 
won his white rugby sweater, which he still proudly 
wears. Nevertheless, his stature and his collection of 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 29 

rugby sweaters has increased noticeably since that time. 
Among other spectacular feats of his early career, 
"Grandmere" managed to have the School put on roll 
call during a half -holiday, by attending a movie rather 
than a hockey game. We can also recall a certain quaran- 
tine edict on a twenty-fourth of May whole! A stalwart 
lineman on Bigside, a successful manager of the i^'irst 
hockey team and an illustrious cricketer on Middleside, 
he was also a member of the Sixth Scholarship, These 
attributes combined with his qualities of leadership 
earned him the position of a Prefect and leader of Brent 
House. In June, "Granny" left us for Varsity, where 
v/e feel sure he will feel happy now that students to 
argue with number in the thousands. 



BEAMENT, J. A.— In the fall of 1940, there arrived from 
Ottawa, via the J.S., a small, pudgy new-boy, who little 
thought that he would some years later grow to be six 
feet three inches tall. This was "The Bosco". Seldom 
missed on account of his size, he played on all three 
First teams, being Captain of cricket and receiving a 
special cup for his fine work on the First hockey team. 
As News Editor of the "Record", many very fine articles 
may easily be traced to his pen, and as a student he 
well deserved the Rigby History Prize. The loss of his 
powerful voice will leave a definite gap in the Choir. 
Early appointed to be a School Prefect, he and his im- 
posing frame filled this position very capably. "Bosco" 
was often to be seen parading up and down the terrace 
during the summer months, his enormous hands holding 
a minute pipe, his eyes staring far away (perhaps To- 
ronto!). After establishing a reputation of no mean 
size, "Bosco" left us to continue his growth — intellectual, 
we hope! — at Trinity College. All the best, "Bosco!" 



SOUTHEY, J. B. S.— With the now familiar yell "Yea, 
Bowmanville", Jim began his rise to fame at T.C.S. All 
his undertakings were accomplished with the same vigour 



30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

that he showed in publicizing his home town. Considered 
last year by many to be one of the finest centre secon- 
daries in Senior High School football, he advanced from 
the Middleside C.O.S.S.A. championship team to become 
an outstanding player on Bigside. "Bonham" was also 
a basketball player of considerable ability, being Co-vice- 
captain of the first team. But where his real ability lay, 
and where he achieved his greatest fame was as a cro- 
quinole player! As Editor of the "Record", Jim estab- 
lished a standard that will be difficult to equal. A Pre- 
fect and a hard-working member of Sixth Scholarship, 
he was eminently successful in both these fields. We 
hope that Jim's scholarship to Queen's University, and 
the work it will necessitate, will not prevent him from 
returning to us often. 



BOVEY, C. A. Q.— "Chris" came from Selwyn House in 
1940, and established in no time a considerable reputa- 
tion for studious enterprise, resulting in his transfer to 
the Fifth Form after Christmas. Academically ascend- 
ing from one peak to another, he climaxed his stay here 
by completing his Upper School Examinations with nine 
first class honours. He worked most diligently as 
Literary Editor of the "Record", and in recognition of 
this was awarded the C. S. Maclnnes Prize. Learning 
to type was no obstacle for Chris, and his continuous 
pounding resulted in pages of printed manuscript and 
swollen fingers — only the few he used, we mean! A 
member of Bigside football and one of the best skiers in 
the School, "Chris" was also an under-hand bowler of 
great prowess on Middleside cricket. Soon after Easter 
he was promoted to the Prefects' Study in recognition 
of his valuable services to the School. We wish him the 
best of luck at McGill where he is studying Science. 



LESUEUR, R. V. — No one could be more suited to be the 
first to receive the Jim McMullen Memorial Trophy than 
Dick. An unselfish, co-operative, hard-working fellow, 
he displayed these qualities in everything he undertook. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 

"Levi" was a keen and masterful end on Bigside, an en- 
thusiastic skier and a useful member of the First cricket 
team. His presence as a female in a play assured its 
success. Wow! ! Even his Housemaster went so far as 
to ask him for a date! "Lassy's" esteem was universal 
and he was especially popular in the Seniors' Common 
Room. When he was made a Prefect there was general 
approval. We shall always remember Dick as one of our 
fine characters and a gentleman. 



KEYES, R. G.— "Rusty" came to us from the J.S. with a 
reputation as a fine athlete and a somewhat colourful 
character. He left us last year with the same impres- 
sion even more indelibly stamped upon our minds. His 
achievements as Captain of basketball, and as a member 
of Bigside rugby, cricket and the First gym. team speak 
for themselves. He was not permitted to play football 
during his last year owing to a serious injury to his 
shoulder, yet he capably filled the position of manager. 
His presence in the Choir, taken for granted for so long, 
will be sadly missed. There was never a dull moment 
when "Rusty" was around, whether in class or outside 
of it, and the songs wh'ch he wrote for the football rallies 
may well be sung as long as the game is played at T.C.S. 
"Rusty" was one of the most cheerful and popular mem- 
bers of the School and it was fitting that he was appoint- 
ed a Prefect. Although he has made no immediate 
plans for the future, we all join in wishing him success 
in whatever endeavour he may undertake. 



SAUNDERSON, D. M.— "Dodo"— "shouldered" his way 
into Brent House by the front door. During his stay he 
managed to grow a few inches (in width) and we are in- 
formed that had he stayed any longer, the construction 
of a new exit would have been necessary. A versatile 
footballer, he played both line and backfield in two suc- 
cessive seasons. Not limiting himself to one sport, how- 
ever, he played Bigside cricket and earned first team 



32 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

colours in Gym. and Basketball. As a member of Sixth 
Scholarship, he was a worthy competitor to Millward and 
MacLaren. Concerned chiefly with Mexico and his pipe, 
he discussed the former while enjoying the latter. Our 
best wishes go with him to Varsity, where we hope that 
he has found door frames more suited to his own. 



MORGAN, D. W.— "Booze" arrived in September, 1941, as 
a bewildered new-boy, but soon distinguished himself by 
making Littleside football and Middleside hockey. Kept 
occupied by rooming with the indefatigable "Ling" dur- 
ing his second year, he found time enough to make Mid- 
dleside football and hockey. An ardent sports fan, Dave 
could generally be found arguing the merits of "Les 
Canadiens", or engaged in a card game of almost any de- 
scription. Besides starring as a first team end and as a 
forward on Bigside hockey, "Booze" was, in his last year, 
a Prefect and Feature Editor of the "Record". Only a 
serious operation during the spring term, prevented him 
from organizing what might have been T.C.S.'s first base- 
ball team. Dave is now studying law at McGill and we 
wish him the best of luck. 



CURTIS, G. C— Back in 1940, Glen answered his first new- 
boy call. Last year he "avenged" that call when he be- 
came a School Prefect. Always keen on sports, he cap- 
tained the gym. team to a championship at Toronto and 
for his outstanding work was awarded a distinction cap. 
"Angels", only after much hard work, became his 
specialty. Football also proved no obstacle to the 
amazing "G.C." and he added a second colour to his 
sweater coat. Photographs of the Gym. team remind us 
of his pride in his physique. Who else would gladly rip 
off their shirt at the slightest notice to display their 
muscles? Glen was a pioneer of the Seniors' Common 
Room. It was here that his charming (?) wit and per- 
sonality found their main outlet. A member of the Sixth 
Form, a Prefect, a two colour man, a member of long 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 33 

standing in the Choir, an accomphshed barber, has left 
us; all we can do now is wish him the best of luck at 
Varsity and hope that he will come back often to lend 
Charlie a hand! 



BURLAND, C. D. D.— "Stone", so named because of his 
adamant appearance and silent manner, really had a 
heart of gold. During his two years in the Sixth form 
he gained a name for himself as a consistent and con- 
scientious worker. Last year he was given the responsi- 
bility of writing up the Chapel Notes for the "Record", 
a task which he performed with all the thoroughness of 
his character. He played Bigside soccer and as a hoc- 
key player acquired the somewhat questionable status 
which most, of our Bermudians seem to attain. In June 
the "Stone" rolled on to Trinity College, and with him 
go our best wishes and sincere hopes that he will find 
some bathtubs even more suitable for sailing boats than 
those which were placed at his disposal here. 



CARLISLE, A. E.— "Big Butch" Carlisle, six feet two and 
a half inches of sunshine, came to the School from Selwyn 
House in 1942. In his first year he made soup for 
Seniors, played soccer and basketball, and worked dili- 
gently in the Chapel and at his studies. Last year he 
played on the Middleside soccer and basketball teams, 
and for his keen interest in the Chapel he was made Co- 
Head Sacristan. His cheery wit and smile, his clumsy 
gait and his humorous determination were almost tradi- 
tional around the School before he left, and he will be 
missed by many. He is now at McGill University, con- 
ducting experiments in an attempt to produce Silicon 
Dioxide as a gas! ! ? 



DELAHAYE, D. J.— "Del" first strode on to a T.C.S. rugby 
field in September, 1942. In November, 1943, he march- 
ed off that same field having won renown on the Middle- 



34 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

side C.O.S.S.A. Champions and as a Little Big Four All- 
Star inside wing. His spirit guided him through the 
hockey season and when the ice had melted he was the 
proud possessor of first team colours. Always quick on 
his feet, "Del's" startling performance as a "dancer" in 
the Bigside Review won him further fame. Although he 
was only with us two years, he left as a Senior and as 
a member of the Sixth Form. His untiring spirit and 
his witty sarcasm will remain with us, even though he 
has returned to his home town to study at Queen's Uni- 
versity. As the future Doctor Delahaye, we gladly tip 
our hats in appreciation and good wishes. With that 
slow smile, "Del", how can you fail to gain high marks 
for bedside manner? 



FISHER, J. P.— "Fish" arrived in 1942, one of the invasion 
of Montrealers, and immediately applied himself vigor- 
ously to school life. He soon became known for his quiet 
friendliness and lazy good nature. Although only here 
two years, he was a vicious tackier on Middleside foot- 
ball, a rugged defenceman on Bigside hockey, a guaran- 
teed-to-go-out-second-baller on Middleside cricket and a 
most ferocious (?) Senior. "J. P.", to round off his 
achievements, carried off fifty percent, of the academic 
prizes in the Fifth Form. "Fish" leaves us for the Naval 
College where we feel sure he will be as successful as he 
was here. 



FRICKER, D. H.— "Swe-e-t one-e-e-e!" The entry of David 
Fricker into the Seniors' Common Room invariably called 
forth this remarkable cry, with "Le Grand Max" taking 
the leading role and the remainder of the Seniors har- 
monizing beautifully. Dave, affectionately called "Sweet 
One" by his friends, came from Bedford, Quebec, staying 
only long enough to top VIA (1). In the athletic field, 
he shone at goal on Bigside soccer and at track, where 
he was Middleside champion. His great passion was 
chemistry, and to exhibit just how far his feelings went, 



TRINITY CX)LLEGE SCHOOL REKJORD 35 

he one day kindly offered some of his more intimate 
friends a candy-like substance, and only when they were 
on the point of swallowing it, did he warn them that it 
was deadly poison. Although he was in charge of the 
Carnegie Room and was a Librarian, he preferred to 
spend his time in the Common Room. The playing of his 
theme song, "Sweeter than the Sweet", brings back un- 
forgetable memories and we hope that McGill will like 
him as much as we all did. 



GILES, P. A. K. — Peter arrived three years ago and soon 
became one of the School's most notorious characters. 
His radical ideas in history resulted in his always being 
the centre of arguments over political or economic sub- 
jects, and he was perhaps the most outspoken member 
of the Political Science Club. Continually conspiring 
with one or two of his more intimate associates to remedy 
aspects of the school system, no intrigue of this nature 
was ever complete without him. It is rumoured that 
Peter is heading for Georgia Tech; whether acquiring a 
Southern drawl or a place on their horse team, we wish 
him the best of luck. 



HIAM, E. W.— "Ned" penetrated the portals of the J.S. 
from Vancouver in 1940, a wisp of light brown hair and 
blue eyes. Here he outshone his fellow students and 
out-argued all assailants of the West for a year, after 
which he left for Brent House and greater things. It 
was here that he acquired the name "Ferdie" after he had 
inflicted one unfortunate with that never-to-be-forgotten 
gem, the common room classic .... "Oh well, it rhymes 
with Pericles!" His biting tongue, lively wit and argu- 
mentativeness were a constant source of amusement and 
enjoyment to his many friends, most of whom spent the 
entire year in his room in the midst of furious sessions. 
It must not be inferred from this, however, that Edwin 
was solely an intellectual. His prowess on Middleside 
football last year was considerable and he was a skier 



36 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

of note, as well as being on the immortal horse team. He 
won the Founder's Prize for Science, gained a first class 
entrance to the M.I.T., and is now slaving under accele- 
rated courses which we feel sure he will successfully out- 
manoeuvre. 



HIGGINBOTHAM, D. C— "Higg", following in his brother's 
footsteps, wandered perplexedly into the J.S. in the fall 
of 1939. His two year career there was climaxed by his 
playing on all three teams. In the Senior School, he 
combined athletics with work so that last year he was 
a top boy in VIA (1), Captain of squash, and a member 
of the First cricket, gym. and tennis teams. Up in the 
gym., his very large feet were always a source of wonder 
and amusement. In recognition of his achievements, 
"Higg" received his Senior privileges. We know he will 
continue his successful career at Trinity College. 



HUGHES, J. A. — Jimmie flew up from sunny Jamaica with 
a collection of "fish" stories that lasted throughout the 
whole year. He never tired of telling us these adven- 
tures (?) of his earlier life, especially in the "smoker" 
where he was sure of an attentive audience. Although 
he did not shine in the scholastic field, he nevertheless 
excelled on the soccer ground and cricket pitch, playing 
on both first teams. As Mr. Batt's "fag" he was un- 
surpassed, and because of his extensive knowledge of 
army regulations, discipline and small arms he developed 
into his right hand man and "chief adviser". We wish 
him the best of luck in the British Army, which he in- 
tends to make his life work. 



JONES, O. T. C— It was four years ago that "Itch", with 
his mop of brilliant red hair visible a mile away, startled 
the Senior School after a year in the J.S. During his 
second year he was one of the pioneers of Petry House. 
By steadily plugging away throughout his stay here, he 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 37 

became, in his final year, a resident of Brent's "Ground 
Floor", a House Officer, a member of the Sixth Form, 
and a Sacristan. His main outside interest was current 
affairs, into which he put much time that was eventually 
rewarded with many boxes of free literature. In his 
own quiet way Owen was one of the most pleasant mem- 
bers of the School and we are indeed sorry not to have 
him back with us. 



^ VALETE 

Banister, K H. — Form VA (1); House Officer; Middleside 
XII, VI and XI; Ski Team; "Record" staff. 

Beament, J. A.— Form VI Sch.; Prefect; XII; VI; Capt. XI; 
News Editor of the "Record"; Choir; Swim- 
ming. 

Bevan, T. A.— Form IIIB. 

Bovey, C. A. Q.— Form VI Sch.; Prefect; Middleside XH; 
Ski Team; Literary Editor of the "Record". 

Britton, P. E.— Form VI Sch.; Prefect; XH; Vice Capt. VI; 
Half XI ; Tennis ; Head Sacristan ; Choir. 

Burland, C. D. D.— Form VIA (1) ; House Officer; Middle- 
side Soccer; "Record" staff; Sacristan. 

Carlisle, A. E.— Form VIA (2); House Officer; Middleside 
Soccer and V; Head Sacristan. 

Cawley, M. A.— Form VB; House Officer; Middleside XH; 
Middleside VI; Choir. 

Chapman, N. V.— Form VA (1); House Officer; Half Soc- 
cer; Winner of the Oxford Cup; Track Team. 

Chase, W. H.— Form VA (1) ; Littleside Soccer. 

Curtis, G. H.— Form VIA (1); Prefect; XH; Capt. VHI; 
Distinction Cap; Sacristan; Choir. 

Delahaye, D. J.— Form VIA (2); Senior; XH; VI; Tennis. 

Edwards, W. J. R.— Form VA (2) ; Middleside V. 

Fricker, J. P. — Form VIA (1) ; Senior; Half Soccer; Track 
Team; Librarian. 

Fulford, G. T.— Form VB; House Officer; Half XII; Middle- 
side V; Swimming; Track. 

Giles, P. A. K— Form VIA (1). 

Henshaw, G. L. G.— Form VB; Half VIH; Littleside Soccer. 



38 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Hiam. E. W.— Form VI Sch.; Senior; Littleside XII; "Re- 
cord" staff; Band. 

Higginbotham, D. C— Form VIA (1); Senior; VIII; XI; 
Middleside Soccer, and VI; Squash Capt., 
Tennis; "Record" Staff. 

Holman, J. P. — Form IVA (1); Middleside Soccer; Choir. 

Holton. J. M.— Form VI Sch.; Prefect; Half XII. 

Hughes, J. A.— Form VIA (2); Half Soccer; Middleside 
Cricket; Track Team. 

Ingham. J. P.— Form IVA (2) ; Half Cricket; Middleside 
Soccer. 

Jones ii, D. F. N.— Form VA (2) ; Middleside VIH; Choir; 
Band. 

Jones i, O. T. C— Form VIA (2) ; House Officer; Littleside 
XII; Sacristan. 

Keyes, R. G.— Form VIA (2); Prefect; Half XII; VIII; 
Capt. V; Half XI; Choir; School Council. 

LeSueur, R. V.— Form VIA (1); Prefect; XII; Half XI; 
Tennis. 

Mathewson, A. deW. — Form VA (1); Middleside Soccer; 
"Record" Staff; Choir; Librarian. 

MacLaren, J, L. — Form VI Sch.; House Prefect; XII. 

McLaughlin, D. W.— Form VB; Ban.d 

McLennan, H. — Form VI Sch.; House Officer; Sacristan. 

Millar, H. D.— Form VIA (1) ; Band. 

Millholland, A. S. — Form VIA (2) ; House Prefect; Distinc- 
tion Cap XII; Half V; "Record" Staff. 

Millward. A. E. — Form VI Sch.; Senior; Head Boy; Li- 
brarian; President Political Science Club. 

Morgan ii, D. W.— Form VIA (1); Prefect; XII; VI; Fea- 
ture Editor of the "Record". 

Morgan i, R. E. S. — Form VIA (2); House Officer; Capt. 
Soccer; Middleside VI; "Record" Staff. 

Parker, E. M. — Form VIA (1); Head Prefect; Bronze 
Medal; Capt. XII and Distinction Cap; Capt. 
VI; Vice Capt. VIII; XI; Choir Leader. 

Penfield, A. J. — Form VA (1); House Officer; Capt. Little- 
side Soccer; "Record" Staff. 

Ransford, R. M. — Form VA (2) ; Middleside Soccer and XI; 
Band; Half Squash. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 39 

Saunderson, D. M.— Form VI Sch.; Prefect; XII; Vm; Vice 

Capt. V; Half XI; "Record" Staff; School 

Council. 
Snelgrove, A. M. — Form IIIB; Choir. 
Southey, J. B. S.— Form VI Sch.; Prefect; XII: Vice Capt 

V (aeq) ; Editor in Chief of the "Record". 
Sutherland, M. B.— Form IVA (2) ; Band; Choir. 
Thow, A. E. W.— Form IVA (2) ; Middleside V; Swimming. 
Vivian, P. B. — Form VA (1) ; Middleside XII; Sacristan. 
Wisener, R. A.— Form VIA (1); House Prefect; Half XII; 

Capt. Middleside VI; Capt. Middleside XI; 

Half Squash; Swimming; Business Manager 

of the "Record". 



SALVETE 

Name Parent or Guardian 

Alley, Peter H. R Col. H. R. Alley, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Armour, David M Stuart Armour, Esq., 

Scarborough, P.O., Ont. 

Banks, David E H. M. Banks, Esq., 

Westmoimt, P.Q. 

Barnes, Allan M L. W. Barnes, Esq., 

Bermuda. 

Beattie, James David Dr. H. J. Beattie, 

Napanee, Ont. 

BermJngham, Chris. W C. J. Bermingham, Esq., 

Kingston, Ont. 

Black, Lennox Kingman Mrs. Eldon Black, 

Montreal, Que. 

Bowles, Richard P W. G. Bowles, Esq., 

Nestleton, Ont. 

Brodeur, Michael T. H A. Toner Brodeur, Esq., 

Westmount, P.Q. 

Bronfman, Edgar M Samuel Bronfman, Esq., 

Westmount, P.Q. 

Brooks, Geoffrey F A. L. Brooks, Esq., 

Welland, Ont. 

Caldbick, John H S. A. Caldbick, Esq., 

Timmins, Ont. 

Chitty, Thomas M. W R, M. WUles Chitty, Esq., K.C. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Gumming, H. Archibald Sq. Ldr. A. R. Gumming, 

Westmount, P.Q. 



40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

de Pencier, John D J. de Pencier, Esq., 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Deverall, D. V Mrs. H. B. Wilson, 

Port Hope, Ont. 

Drew, C. G. Hart G. S. Drew, Esq., 

Timmins, Ont. 

Drummond, T. Kevin L.. C. Drummond, Esq., 

Montreal, Que. 

Emery. David J Wing Cmdr. H. J. Emery, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Fennell, T. Scott Robt. Fennell, Esq., K.C., 

Toronto, Ont. 

Fulford, Dwight W G. T. Fulford, Esq., M.P., 

Brockville, Ont. 

Gaunt, Richard H R. T. Gaunt, Esq., 

Westmount, P.Q. 

Hall, T. M. H D. B. Hall, Esq., 

Toronto, Ont. 

Hamilton, E. W. D W. C. Hamilton, Esq., 

Isle Maligne, Que. 

Hariey, G. Peter G. E. Harley, Esq., 

Toronto, Ont. 

Hawke, C. W E. E. Hawke, Esq., 

York MHls, Ont. 

Hibbard, Eric D Eric A. Hibbard, Esq., 

Grand'Mere, Quebec. 

Hughes, John N N. W. Hughes, Esq., 

Jamaica, B.W.I. 

Huycke, Graeme M G. M. Huycke, Esq., K.C. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Johnston, P. D. L Major Gwynne R. Johnston, 

Brockville, Ont. 

Kingman, Abner Jr A. Kingman. Esq., 

Montreal, Que. 

Langdon, J. Kenneth Wm. O. Langdon, Esq., 

Timmins, Ont. 

Luke, Peter S. C M. C. Luke, Esq., 

Kingston, Ont. 

Macklem, O. Richard O. T. Macklem, Esq., 

Kingston, Ont. 

Montagu, R. E. D JLiady Norah Montagu, 

Edmonton, Alta. 

Morgan, John D T. G. Morgan, Esq., 

Westmount, P.Q. 

Morgan, J. Stuart H. W. Morgan, Esq., 

Montreal, P.Q. 

Morris, G. Peter A. C. Morris, Esq., 

Port Hope, Ont. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 41 

Murray, John C X<ee Murray, Esq., 

Toronto, Ont. 

MacDowell, Thain H T. W. MacDowell, Esq., 

Westmount, P.Q. 

MacLaren, A. K G. F. MacLaren, Esq., 

Ottawa, Ont. 

MacLean, Hugh A Mrs. A. D. MacLean 

York Mills, Ont. 

Mclntyre, Donald D. Gordon Mclntyre, Esq., 

Sarnia, Ont. 

McLennan, Murray E E. P. McLennan, Esq., 

Gananoque, Ont. 

McPherson, David B Col. E. B. McPherson, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Newcomb, W. Kent, Jr W. K. Newcomb, Esq., 

Montreal, Que. 

Pangman, Peter M J. B. Pangman, Esq., 

Westmount, P.Q. 

Paterson, Jeremy J. M Mrs. John Paterson, 

Washington, D.C. 

Pilcher, Geoffrey C Major N. R. Pilcher, 

Bobcaygeon, Ont. 

Pratt. Stedman B L. Pratt, Esq., 

Hampstead, P.Q. 

Prentice, James D Mrs. J. D, Prentice, 

Halifax. N.S. 

Ralph, Thomas H E. C. Ralph, Esq., 

Dunnville, Ont. 

Ray, Walter J. F W. R. G. Ray, Esq., 

Lindsay, Ont. 

Rogers, Ian F. H F. E. Rogers, Esq., 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Scott, Frederick L Lt. Col. J. Fred Scott. 

Calgary, Alta. 

Spencer, Edwin T E. E. Spencer, Esq., 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Stone, John C L. J. Stone, Esq., 

Jamaica, B.W.I. 

Tanner, W. H. R E. H. Tanner, Esq., 

Calgary, Alta. 

Taylor, George O Dr. C. E. Taylor, 

Timmins, Ont. 

Taylor Geoffrey B W. M. Taylor, Esq., 

Montreal, Que. 

Tessier, Andrew L. Tessier, Esq., 

Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Wells, Anthony C. B N. L. Wells, Esq., 

Oakville, Ont. 



42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Welsford, Hugh W H. G. Welsford, Esq., 

Westmount, P.Q. 

White, Patrick A A. O. White, Esq., 

Montreal, Que. 

Whitehead, E. A. R Mrs. T. Ross Whitehead, 

Westmount, P.Q. 

Wilhamson, J. P J. D. Williamson, Esq., 

Toronto, Ont. 

Wilson, Frank W. Jr Judge Frank W. Wilson, 

Perth, Ont. 

Wismer, James Stuart Gordon S. Wismer, Esq., 

Sherman, B.C. 

Woods, John R S. E. Woods, Esq., 

Ottawa, Ont. 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL REKIORD 



43 



Contributions 




IL EST MORT BRAVEMENT 

The wide and rolling waste of sea 

Lay vast and unexplored before our eyes; 

The ship plowed steadily ahead 

Into the creamy crest, and, were we wise 

We should have turned about, retraced 

Our course, and put back into shore; but firmly 

We forged into an unknown world. 

'Twas weeks before the Captain would affirm the 

Nature of the good ship's course. 

"My boys", he said, "you may have heard some tales 

Pertaining to this voyage; nay. 

The truth is lacking there, and naught avails 

To sway me from my foremost aim — 

To find a passage through the Straits, and west 

And even westward to the East 

To sail; to find La Chine, and to invest 

In silks and spices, bringing back 

To England luxury unknown before, 

And gain large profits for my ends." 

Alas, he saw his homeland never more! 

We 'came more wary of our lot, 
And then our Captain to mistrust. 
We set him in the ship's small yacht, 
And gave him water, meat, a crust, 
And pushed him off to do his best 
To reach old England, weeks away. 



44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

The food we'd giv'n, two weeks at best 

His son and him would serve each day; 

We thus were sure we'd see no more 

Those men we'd left behind; and then: 

"Weigh anchor, hoist the mains'l", roar 

The mates. At once to posts the men 

Make haste; the new moon moves from out 

The night and takes a new content 

And settled crew towards home. About 

Twelve men e'er reached dear England, bent 

On settling down and leaving home 

No more! their Captain ne'er was found, 

But lies alway beneath the foam 

In waters named for him; he drowned, 

Perhaps a hero to mankind, 

But not the sailors who forsook 

The trust which he had giv'n. Behind 

They left a man who shall e'er look 

With favour on the bold who try 

To find the passage to the East 

And sail and find La Chine and vie 

With others for control. He ceased 

To live, but still his spirit guides 

Explorers nearer to their goal. 

Old Hudson lies among those brides 

Of chance, who give their soul 

That others may achieve, where they 

Have failed; and they their guides obey. 



.R.L.. 



STORM BREWING 



The breathless silence was significant, yet the moon 
shone in a broad, blue heaven. The gentle lapping of tiny 
waves against the soft sand of the beach was the only 
sound in the breathless, tropical night. Even the many 
tiny animals were silent, as if in deference to the majestic 
beauty of this night. A wispy cloud floated lazily across 
the moon, and for a moment all was bathed in a soft, re- 
fracted half-light. Only the gentle swaying of the tallest 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 45 

palms gave evidence to the warm breeze, which occasionally 
njffled through the dense underbrush. Almost imper- 
ceptibly, however, the friendly breeze began to quicken, un- 
til it was no longer gentle, but fresh and powerful — a harsh 
reminder of nature's indomitable might. The trees began 
to creak ominously and the ocean was whipped into angry, 
foam-flecked swells. The moon hid its head, as if in 
shame, behind the vanguard of the onrushing clouds, and 
a few spattering drops of rain completed the destruction 
of the peaceful night. 

— H.F. 



OUR CROSS 

It rises graceful as a tomb. 
With symbolism dread; 
A link connecting love and tears — 
The living with the dead. 

It represents a motley throng 

With but one common trait; 

They gave their lives for King and Home, 

For those who stand and wait. 

On carefree boys who play there now, 
Heedless of those who came before, 
The cross looks down and silent speaks: 
"Their names shall live for evermore". 



— J.G.G. 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

Dear Mr. Editor: 

There is a subject which I have been extremely anxious 
to discuss for some time, and through the medium of your 
esteemed space, I wish to express my personal views on 
Classical Music with the hope that they will be read by 
many. 

First, I should like to point out the prejudice conjured 
up in many minds by the mere words "classical" or "sym- 



46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

phony". (Just as a matter of interest, it might be pointed 
out here that in strict musical terminology the term "clas- 
sical" is only applied to the composers Bach, Handel, 
Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven. Brahms was a Romanticist 
and Shostakovitch is a Modernist). These prejudices can 
easily be overcome by first listening to music more easy 
to understand, before trying to tackle the lengthier and 
more involved works of the great masters, which might 
seem less obviously rhythmic and melodious to the un- 
initiated. 

Too often, five minutes of a Brahms Symphony, heard 
over the radio during an afternoon, has formed a lifelong 
antagonism against music. Rare is the man who can 
appreciate a gigantic work like Beethoven's "Eroica" Sym- 
phony on first hearing it, much less if he is listening to 
classical music for the first time. We do not start Algebra 
with the Binomial Theorem; why, then, should we start 
music appreciation with the "Emperor" Concerto? Well 
known and universally loved works like the "Nutcracker 
Suite", Brahms' "Hungarian Dances", Elgar's "Pomp and 
Circumstance Marches" and Handel's "Water Music" 
should be heard first, before the listener attempts to cope 
with such gargantuan affairs as the "Choral Symphony" 
or Brahms' great "Violin Concerto". 

In the future, it would be encouraging to be able to 
look forward to music hours interspersed with music such 
as has been mentioned above, full of rhythm and melody, 
to make easy listening for those who are willing to try and 
break their prejudices or dislikes. Classical music has 
been defined as something which threatens to turn into a 
melody any minute but never quite succeeds. The School 
has a superb record library. Why not enlist its aid to 
prove that this saying is a gross misstatement of facts? 
The great melodies of the world are to be found among 
the great composers. When most people to-day hear such 
melodies as "Moon Love", "Tonight We Love", "Coin' 
Home", they little realize that they are listening to sym- 
phonic themes. What difference should a title such as 
"The Opening Theme of the Second Movement to Tschai- 
kowsky's 5th Symphony in E Minor" make to the intrinsic 



i 



TRINITY COIX,EGE SCHCX)L RECORD 47 

qualities of the music? The theme under question has 
been known and loved the world over by all people of all 
ages as "Moon Love". What difference should the former 
title make to it? 

If some of us will learn to disregard the v/ords "Con- 
certo", "Symphony", etc., and pass through the funda- 
mental gates of musical nomenclature, vast new fields of 
pleasure will be opened in the form of lively dance and 
beautiful melody. 

— H.C.B. 




Off THg 

RECORD 



DOWN WITH SHERLOCK! 

Listen my children to this tale 

By an author predominantly male. 

Though many have striven since start of time, 

I shall accomplish the perfect crime. 

The simplicity of which will elicit a groan 

From celebrities such as Al Capone; 

And I gloat on the death, with a smile so chipper, 

Of "Baby Face" Nelson and Jack "the Ripper". 

If only they'd had the wits to see, 

If only they'd been as brainy as me; 

This plan, when publicly unlatched. 

Shall be a felony with no strings attached. 

But at present, like a freshly bloomed geranium; 

It reposes within my fertile cranium; 



48 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Newsboys shall shout and books shall be written, 

Mastenninds by dismay be smitten; 

They'll lay down their pens and "hit the bottle" 

As they rank me along with Aristotle; 

They'll pronounce me (while foaming with ill-suppressed 

rages) 
The greatest thinker of the ages. 
I'll need no gun, no rope, no arsenic, 
I'll commit no theft, either petty or larsenic; 
I need no henchmen, "front" or "stool", 
My method's open to the plainest fool. 
Just provide me with time to meditate 
And a building, say the "Empire State". 
If curiosity still doth rack your side, 
My friend, I'm going to commit suicide. 

— H.C.B. 



DISMAY 

They stood facing each other. There was a snarl on 
the face of one, while the other portrayed grim determina- 
tion. Their breath came in short, quick gasps. Both 
looked dog-tired and completely done-in ; yet, it was obvious 
to me, the spectator, that neither was prepared to give up 
till he dropped. "Snarl face" began slowly to move around, 
looking for an opening. The other stood his ground, facing 
him. Then suddenly, with blood dripping from a cut on 
his cheek, "snarl face" leaped at his opponent. Every ounce 
of strength in his body was behind that charge. He strove, 
with every muscle straining, to batter his opponent to the 
ground. Finally, he burst through, thrust his enemy out 
of the way, and .... Oh! how bitter is life! For his 
stupendous efforts had been to no avail. The play had 
gone around the other end. 

— G.A.H.P. 



TRINITY COLi,EGE SCHOOL. RECORD 



49 





vtmK^ 




EDITORIAL 

"Will T.C.S. ever win the Little Big Four Champion- 
ship?" That's what they are saying. After ten long years 
of hoping and waiting, people are beginning to wonder if 
Ridley will ever lose its commanding position and, more 
than that, will Trinity ever take its place? 

We are not prepared to answer such questions, but 
if these onlookers would take a second glance at the situa- 
tion we can readily say that they might adopt a new atti- 
tude. 

First of all, it is the continual harping on Ridley's 
power that forms one of the greatest obstacles to defeat- 
ing them. An inferiority complex is established. Each 
year, the team starts its training with a definite purpose 
in mind — to win the championship; but as the term goes 
on they hear nothing but Ridley, Ridley, and Ridley. By 
the time the famed game is to be played, a team of twelve 
sleepless, mental wrecks go out onto the field. 

Secondly, there is that great demand for speed, condi- 
tion and spirit. Anyone who has played any football at 
all knows that these three aspects cannot be grasped at one 
fell swoop. It is the organizing, the interest and the friend- 
ship of a group of boys, not in their last year of the School, 
but in their first, playing as a unit until they finally take 
the field as a first team. This is the team that will beat 
Ridley. They will be playing just another game, forgetful 
of the reputation they oppose. They will be the winners 



50 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

of the Little Big Four. We are unable to say whether il 
is T.C.S., U.C.C. or St. Andrew's who will be the first to up- 
set Ridley. But it is undoubtedly the one who shows the 
most spirit and drive, with each individual playing with a 
smile on his face. Our hats go off to Ridley who has suc- 
ceeded in doing this for many years. 

As another season rolls around we have tried to mould 
together a squad which best suits these said conditions. It 
appears that the spirit of last year's Bigside squad has been 
inherited to the fullest extent by the boys on the team. It 
IS with this spirit that we hope Trinity will prove to be a 
definite stumbling block to all teams in the Little Big Four. 
Already, five first team games have been played ; three have 
been won, one tied and one lost. The first Little Big Four 
tilt was tied with St. Andrew's, and this result gives us a 
hopeful outlook on the remaining games. Huycke i has 
been elected Captain, with Mclntyre i and Sinclair co- Vice- 
Cap tains. 

Middleside is entered in the C.O.S.S.A. Junior league 
and has played four games to date. Three have been won 
and one lost. It is on the assumption that teams are at 
last being created on Middleside and Littleside, and are ad- 
vancing as well formed groups, that we say the future looks 
bright for many years. O'Grady has been elected Captain, 
and Curtis Vice-Captain. 

Littleside is made up of some very promising new boys 
and a number of last year's members. A strong combina- 
tion might develop, and another first rate team be in the 
making. Payne has been elected Captain and Goodbody 
Vice-Captain. 

More games are scheduled in Soccer than ever before. 
School games are being carried on as usual and many games 
are being played with some crack Air Force teams. Cox i 
has been elected Captain and Barber Vice-Captain. 

Work in the gym. has been almost totally confined to 
new boys. Members of last year's Eight have been assist- 
ing, however, and mention of a Little Big Four meet some- 
time this year has been made. O'Grady has been elected 
Captain and Gibson ii Vice-Captain. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 

SCHOOL, vs. PICKERING COLLEGE 
At Toronto, b;e!rU'ml>er 30 

In their first game of the season, a hard fighting T.C.S. 
team defeated a heavier Pickering College squad 11-7. Al- 
though marred by frequent penalties, the game was well 
played, with the School having the edge by virtue of their 
steady drive and fight. 

T.C.S. kicked off deep into enemy territory. Pickering 
gradually worked their way up the field by a series of long 
kicks by Rob, until in the early minutes of the game, they 
held the ball on the School's forty yard line. They bucked 
to the four yard line on a beautiful play, but were stopped 
by a hard-charging T.C.S. line. Huycke recovered a fum- 
ble two yards out and immediately kicked out of danger. 
In two plays, however, Pickering was back inside the ten 
yard line, and finally Budgeon bucked over for the touch- 
down. The convert failed. The rest of the quarter de- 
veloped mainly into a kicking duel between Huycke and 
Rob. 

The School opened the second quarter with a deter- 
mined drive and this time they were not to be denied. A 
first down, a recovered fumble and a blocked kick put them 
well inside the Pickering end zone. A beautiful pass from 
Huycke to Lambert put the ball on the eight yard line. 
Richardson then carried it over on a well executed end run, 
to tie it up. The attempted convert failed. Pickering 
threatened again when they recovered a fumble in T.C.S. 
territory, but the School fought hard and held them out. 
An attempted field goal failed. Sinclair and Richardson 
ran back Rob's good kick and brought the ball out of dan- 
ger. The half ended before either team could get started 
again. 

Pickering picked up another point on a rouge from the 
opening kick-off of the second half. They threatened again 
when they recovered a fumble on the T.C.S. sixteen yard 
line, but were held with no gain. A rouge was called back 
on a penalty, so the score remained 6-5. 

The School then started another drive with Huycke 
bucking for two successive first downs. Here they were 
stopped, but a good kick put Pickering back in their own 



52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

territory. After an exchange of kicks, Sinclair ran back 
to the Pickering forty yard line. A first down on bucks 
and a long pass, Huycke to Lambert, put the ball on the 
three yard line. Two bucks were stopped but another pass 
from Huycke to Lambert clicked for a second touchdown. 
Decker made the convert good and T.C.S. led 11-6. Play 
see-sawed back and forth with the School having a slight 
edge. Although they recovered a fumble, they were held, 
and a field goal failed. After an exchange of kicks, Mc- 
Murrich intercepted a Pickering pass and ran to the twenty 
yard line. Again Pickering beat off the attack, and an- 
other field goal failed. Pickering got one more point on a 
rouge kicked by Rob but from then on they were held in 
their attempt for another touchdown. 

Rob was the outstanding player for Pickering, his 
kicking saving the day many times, and his bucking gain- 
ing many yards. For the School, the line as a whole play- 
ed well, while Richardson and Huycke were best in the 
backfield. 

Pickering — MacDonald, Goobie, Rivers, Dickson, McGowen, Kon- 
duris, Bird, B. Richardson, E. Richardson, Servus, Rob, Budgeon, B. 
Marshall, Greenbaum, W^ansboro, Meir, Brown, Palmer, Kernahan, 
Bolby, J. Marshall, Pinkham, Harvey, Fallis. 

T.C.S. — Huycke (Capt.), Sinclair, Decker, Richardson, Wilson, 
Mclntyre i, French i, Greenwood, Greig, Warner, Gillan, Wade, Lam- 
bert, Roenisch, McMurrich, Toole, Gilbert, Howard, Dobell i. Drew, 
Phippen, Robson, Mclntyre ii, Vernon, Pearson. 



SCHOOL vs. PETEKBOROUGH 

At Port Hoj)*', OctobtT 4 

On Wednesday, October 4, T.C.S. won their second 
game in two starts. Although handicapped by the absence 
of six of the starting line-up, a fighting Trinity team down- 
ed Peterborough Collegiate, 19-0. Capitalizing on fumbles 
and superior kicking, the School had the edge on the play 
throughout the game. 

T.C.S. kicked off, and managed to keep Peterborough 
well back in their own end, forcing them to kick. The 
School were unable to gain, and Lambert kicked to the 
Peterborough five where a bad snap to Sisson resulted in a 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 

safety-touch. Peterborough ran the ball to centre-field, 
where they were held, and the quarter ended with an ex- 
change of kicks and the score at 2-0. 

At the start of the second quarter, Dobell intercepted 
a pass and went to the Peterborough thirty-five, where a 
Huycke to Lambert pass, put the School in scoring posi- 
tion, but Peterborough held, and Huycke kicked a single. 
Trinity then recovered a fumble and a Huycke-Richardson- 
Dobell end run went thirty yards to the Peterborough ten. 
Richardson scored on an end run and Sinclair converted to 
make the score 9-0. 

Peterborough kicked off, and forced the School to kick 
from their own forty-five. Dobell then recovered another 
fumble and ran sixty yards for the second touchdown. Sin- 
clair failed to convert and at half time the score stood 14-0. 

The School kicked off to start the second half and, due 
to another fumble, got the ball on their forty-five where a 
Sinclair to Mclntyre pass drove into scoring territory — but 
Peterborough held. Sinclair then intercepted a pass, but 
Peterborough repeated the performance and kicked to the 
forty. An end run to the twenty, and a Sinclair to Lam- 
bert pass for a major, ended the scoring as an attempted 
field goal failed. 

In the final quarter, the play was fairly even, Peter- 
borough's numerous passes failing, and the School defend- 
ing their lead with excellent kicking until the final whistle. 

For the School, Lambert, Sinclair and Dobell combined 
to respectively kick, pass and run their way through a 
slightly disorganized Peterborough squad, while De la 
Plante, Mathews, Sisson and Brown were the pick of the 
losers. 

T.C.S. — Sinclair, P. Mclntyre, Wilson, Lambert, Richardson, Do- 
bell, Phipp>en, Stokes, Greenwood, Greig, B. Mclntyre, French, Wade, 
Warner, Vernon, Roemsch, Pearson, Toole, Howard, Gilbert, Robson, 
Allen. 

Peterborough — Rooke, Sisson, Outram, Robinson, De la Plante, 
Scott, W. Brown, Paterson, Lech, Graham, Davis, Smith, Loftus, 
Brown, Mathews, Estlick, Hinton, Managhan. 



54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. OLD BOYS 
At Port Hope, October 9 

In the annual game against the Old Boys, the School 
showed plenty of drive and spirit to down them 17-2 for 
their third straight win. The Old Boys team, a majority 
of whom were old first team colours, had one of the best 
teams in many years, but the all-round play of T.C.S. 
proved superior. 

The Old Boys kicked off and, after several exchanges 
of kicks, they intercepted a pass in School territory. After 
bucking for a first down, Macdonald quick-kicked to Sin- 
clair who was tackled behind his own line to give the Old 
Boys a 1-0 lead. Two good kicks by Huycke put the Old 
Boys on their own twenty-five where Lambert set up the 
first touchdown by recovering a fumble. A lovely pass 
from Huycke to Lambert was completed for a major score. 
The convert failed. After the kick-off, the Old Boys got a 
first down on a pass. Huycke intercepted a second Old 
Boys' pass on his own thirty as the quarter ended. 

Play remained in centre field until the Old Boys re- 
covered their own kick on a fumble and held the ball on 
the School's thirty. Macdonald then kicked another rouge 
for the Old Boys' second point. 

The School constantly gained ground on Huycke's 
good kicks and the running of Sinclair and Richardson. 
With a short time left in the first half, the School took 
possession at mid-field. Richardson circled the short end 
for a first down, and two long passes from Huycke to Do- 
bell put the ball on the four yard line. The Old Boys' re- 
sistance then strengthened; two passes were knocked down, 
and a buck was stopped. The half ended with the score 
still 5-2. 

Play see-sawed back and forth in the third quarter, 
with both teams missing many chances to score, until 
Huycke intercepted an Old Boys' pass. Two passes, Sin- 
clair to French, and Huycke to Toole, put the ball on the 
four yard line, and from there Huycke bucked over for the 
School's second touchdown. Decker converted to make the 
score 11-2. 

In the last quarter both teams opened up with passes. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 

but interceptions counteracted these, and neither team 
was able to score. It was not until late in the game, when 
Vernon recovered a fumble, that the School scored again. 
A long pass, Huycke to Lambert, put the ball in scoring 
position, and then Richardson carried it over on a forty 
yard end run. Decker converted to make the score 17-2. 
The Old Boys made a last attempt to score, but two long 
passes were incompleted, and they were forced to kick. 

For the School, Sinclair and Huycke were the best in 
the backfield, while Mclntyre and Wade starred in the line. 
Beament and Britton were best for the Old Boys, with the 
former's line work outstanding and the latter's bucking 
gaining many yards. Stalwarts helping the Old Boys from 
last year and the year before were the Headmaster, Jim 
Kerr from the team of '37 and Lieut. Pete Armour, R.C.N. 
V.R., back on leave. The Headmaster made a costly fumble 
before redeeming himself in the dying moments of the game 
by a beautiful interception and run. He was heard to say 
that he "is going to hang up his boots, now". 

T.C.S. — Sinclair, Mclntyre, Lambert, Decker, Richardson, Wade, 
Warner, Gillan, Greenwood, Vernon, Dobell, Wilson, Roenisch, Mc- 
Murrich, Stokes, Grieg, Allen, French, Toole, Howard, Robson. 

Old Boys — Southey (Capt.), LeSueur, Macdonald, Britton, Saiin- 
derson, Kerr, Delahaye, Holton, Begunent, MacLaren, Dave Morgan, 
Curtis, the Headmaster, Wight, Pete Armour, Ingham. 



SCHOOL vs. U.T.S. 
At Toronto, October 13 

The School had its three game winning streak snapped, 
when they lost their fourth contest by a 16-12 margin. 
Taking advantage of costly T.C.S. errors, the U.T.S. men 
scored three unconverted touchdowns before the School 
could collect a major score. Behind 5-1 at half time, the 
School had numerous chances to score but were turned back 
by a hard-charging line. Although the game was lost, the 
team showed much improvement and came from the short 
end of a 15-1 score late in the second half to fall just short 
of their mark. T.C.S. collected seventeen first downs to 
seven by U.T.S. 

T.C.S. kicked off and held the play well in the U.T.S. 



56 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

end until half-way through the first quarter when a Trinity 
pass was intercepted, A quick Crawford to Maxwell pass 
put U.T.S. into T.C.S. territory, and they stayed there until 
they were forced to kick. Lambert's short kick from his 
goal line gave U.T.S. their first break and Graham romped 
around a dazed Trinity team for their first touch. 

The second quarter was all T.C.S. From the start 
they threatened, to be rewarded by a rouge on one of 
Huycke's kicks. Soon after, by showing a strong end nm, 
Trinity was in possession on the U.T.S. one yard line but 
failed in three attempts to bang it over. The score stood 
5-1 at the end of the half. 

Early in the second half Doll picked up a T.C.S. fumble 
and ran the remaining distance untouched, to score the 
second U.T.S. touchdown. Not many minutes later Max- 
well kicked a high spiral into School territory. Huycke's 
return was blocked, and Crawford ploughed through centre 
for another major score. U.T.S. led 15-1. 

Coming back heavily witth a tremendous end run that 
netted 160 yards in seventeen calls, T.C.S. finally started 
to roll, and Decker charged across the U.T.S. line for an 
unconverted score. Receiving the kick-off, the School con- 
tinued to drive and in twelve plays McMurrich had circled 
the short end for another T.C.S. touchdown. Decker con- 
verted. From then on it was strictly a kicking and passing 
game until Sinclair was eventually rouged on Maxwell's 
quick kick in the closing minutes of the game. 

Picking individual stars in this game would be im- 
possible. U.T.S. never missed a chance that came their 
way. They completed seven out of eleven passes and Max- 
well's kicking had our halves guessing right up to the final 
whistle. For Trinity there were no individual standouts. 
The line played "heads up" football all day, and the end 
nmning of the backs was brilliant. Coming back late in 
the game to almost score the knockout punch, T.C.S. show- 
ed a team which should carry its weight well in the Little 
Big Four tilts to come. 

T.C.S. — Huycke, P. Mclntyre, Sinclair, Lambert, Decker, Wade, 
Richardson, Warner, Gillan, Greenwood, Vernon, Dobell, RoenLsch, 
McMurrich, Phippen, B. Mclntyre, Stokes, Greig, Allen, French, 
Toole, Howard, Robson. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 57 

U.T.S. — Maxwell, Crawford, Schutte, Graham, Bark, Kitchen. 
Pugh, Holman, Carroll, Lyons, Robertson, Doll, Evans, Johnson, 
Brown, Gibson, McArthur, Cheney, Livingstone, Zimmerman, Priest- 
man, Wilson, Mustard, Allen, Firstbrook, Lawson. 



T.C.S. vs. S.A.C. 
At Port Hope, October 21 

In their opening Little Big Four encounter, T.C.S. held 
a powerful S.A.C. team to a 5-5 deadlock in a hard-fighting 
game. Although S.A.C. was much heavier, the superior 
drive and tackling of the School kept them in check. 

From the opening whistle, both teams were fighting 
hard, but over-anxiousness caused frequent fumbles in the 
first period. Neither team capitalized on them, however, 
and the play was fairly even until Dobell kicked a fumbled 
S.A.C. snap to the thirty yard line and recovered it. After 
one first down, the S.A.C. line held, but a beautiful kick by 
Huycke drew first blood for T.C.S. Saylor of S.A.C. inter- 
cepted a T.C.S. lateral and ran to the fifteen yard line be- 
fore he was nabbed from behind by Decker. S.A.C. at- 
tempted to tie it up, but a penalty called their rouge back 
and it was the School's ball. 

Because of many S.A.C. fumbles the School stayed in 
S.A.C. territory throughout the second quarter, and Huycke 
picked up three more points by virtue of sensational kick- 
ing. T.C.S. led at half-time, 4-0. 

Both teams started fast in the second half and kept 
the fighting pace up all the way. The School "got the 
drop" thanks to a long kick-off and kept it in S.A.C. terri- 
tory, but were held out from scoring by the good line work 
of Saint Andrew's and the running of their backs. Time 
and again T.C.S. was in scoring position but were balked. 
Slowly, S.A.C. worked their way out and early in the fourth 
quarter held the ball at mid-field, after a long run by Ken- 
nedy and a completed pass which was good for a first down. 
Then Middleton carried the ball over on a thirty yard re- 
verse end run. The convert failed and the score was 5-4. 

From then on it was all T.C.S. The School got the 
ball on the kick-off because of illegal blocking. They drove 
in deep, but a penalty gave S.A.C. the ball. Warner re- 



58 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

covered a fumble on the fifteen yard line and Huycke kick- 
ed the equalizer. Again and again T.C.S. tried for the 
winning point, but good running by the St. Andrew's backs 
brought the ball out from the goal-line and there was no 
further scoring. 

Huycke's kicking was the outstanding feature of the 
game, gaining all five points for the School. Richardson's 
running and Wade's and Mclntyre's tackling also stood out, 
although the whole team played well. For S.A.C., Robin- 
son starred on the line and Shortly and Kennedy were good 
in the backfield. 

S.A.O. — Flying wing, J. Smith; quarter, Shortly; halves, Taylor, 
Kennedy, Middleton; snap, Murdock; insides, Edward, Saylor; mid- 
dles, Fleming (Capt.), Robinson; outsides, Hepburn, Errington; sub- 
stitutes, Smith, Cuthbert, Wynne, McCauley, Watson, A. Smith, 
Chipman, Montgomery. 

T.C.S. — Flying wing, Lambert; quarter, Sinclair; halves, Huycke 
(Capt.), Decker, Richardson; snap. Wade; insides, Warner, Gillan; 
middles, Greenwood, Vernon; outsides, Mclntyre, Dobell i; substitutes, 
Allen, French i, Greig, McMurrich, Stokes, Toole, Wilson i, Gilbert, 
Howard, Mclntyre ii, Phippen, Pearson i, Roenisch, Robson. 



MIDDLESIDE 



SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH 

At Port Hope, October 4 

This was the first game of the season for Middleside 
and they started off with a triumph of 14-0 over Peter- 
borough Juniors. T.C.S. kicked off and soon had possession 
at centre. From there they marched up the field to Peter- 
borough's two yard line, where Curtis kicked a single. Led 
by Doughty, Peterborough began to press. But, due to the 
excellent work by the line, Middleside reached Peter- 
borough's five yard line, where Curtis kicked another single. 
In the second quarter, Peterborough made a twenty yard 
gain on a long pass, but exceptional running by Bowles and 
strong tackling on the line brought T.C.S. back to Peter- 
borough's two yard line. Again Curtis clicked, this time 
on a buck for a major score.. He also converted to make 
the score 8-0. 

In the third quarter a very strong line, coupled with 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 59 

the excellent rimning of Lawson, Curtis and Bowles, 
brought the School deep into enemy territory. Here Cur- 
tis kicked for one point. In the fourth quarter O'Grady, 
carrying the ball on an end run, made a sensational gain 
of thirty yards, which left the School just four yards from 
a scoring position. Curtis smashed through centre for a 
touchdown. This ended the scoring at 14-0 for the School. 
Curtis, Bowles and O'Grady stood out for the School, 
while Doughty and Green were the best for the losers. 

Feterboroug-h — Green, Graham, Thompson, G. Braund, Addjman, 
Frist, Wyatt, Rush, Menzies, Doughty, McKee, Borland, Mclntyre, 
B. Braund, Moiyles, Bond, Lech, Martin, Beavis. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady (Capt.), Curtis, Jarvis, Bowles, Lawson, Fisher, 
Gibson, Bird, Dobell ii, Grier, Austin ii, French ii, McDougall, Kirk- 
patrick, Wigle, Hawke, Hogarth, Mahaffy, Currie, Armour i. 



SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE 
At Port Hope, October 11 

In its second game of the season, Middleside lost a 
hard-fought battle to Port Hope by a score of 22-6. T.C.S. 
kicked off and although they did not get the ball for some 
time, they marched right down the field until Lawson buck- 
ed over for an unconverted touchdown. Soon after. Watts 
of P.H.S. circled the long side end for a converted touch- 
down, making the score 6-5. In the second quarter, Curtis 
kicked a rouge to tie the score, but Port Hope sent Watts 
over for another touchdown to make it 11-6. 

During the next quarter, it was doubtful whether the 
School could stop Port Hope's end runs or not; however, 
they held successfully. In the opening minutes of the 
fourth quarter, Leese of Port Hope fell on a fumble for a 
touchdown which was unconverted, giving Port Hope the 
lead 16-6. The score remained thus until the last play of 
the game, when Port Hope completed a sensational pass 
play with Watts carrying it over for a converted touch- 
down, making the final score 22-6. 

O'Grady, Curtis and Grier were outstanding for the 

School, while Watts, Biset and Austin starred for P.H.S. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady (Capt.), Curtis, Jarvis, Gibson ii, Bird, Fisher, 

McDougall, Lawson, Bowles, Grier, Austin ii, Dobell ii, Hawke i, 

Kirkpatrick, Wigle, French ii, Paterson i, Currie, Main, Mahaffy. 



60 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

P.H-S. — Ingoldrud, Mark, Watson, Brown, Watts, Aiistin, Leese, 
Saunders, Pollard, Jones, Currelly, Datzko, Blset, Smith, Holman, 
SnelgTOve. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 

At Lakefield, October 14 

In Middleside's first exhibition game against Lakefield 
the School came out on top in a very undecided game, 15-7. 
Winning the choice, T.C.S. kicked off and started well by 
holding the Grove to a loss on their first three downs. The 
School then marched down the field and Curtis kicked a 
single, giving T.C.S. a 1-0 lead at the end of the first 
quarter, 

Lakefield put on a powerful drive to push T.C.S. back 
for a safety touch but soon after the Grove fumbled and 
Bird recovered the ball. Curtis kicked a field goal which 
gave the School the lead once more. Just before the whistle 
went to end the first half, Curtis kicked for another point, 
making it 5-2 for Trinity. 

Lakefield kicked off, recovered the kick, and with a 
burst of power, marched down the field until Smart bucked 
over for a touchdown which was not converted. The Grove 
led 7-5. There was no more scoring this quarter. As the 
game was drawing to a close, Hawke fell on a fumble be- 
hind the Grove's line to score a touchdown. The convert 
failed. Finishing in a blaze of glory, Curtis smashed 
through centre to score a touchdown, giving T.C.S. the 
game, 17-5. 

O'Grady, French and Hawke starred for the School, 
while Reave's kicking and Smart's bucking showed up well 
for Lakefield. 

L.P.S. — Kerr, Giespecker, Langmuir, Smart, Preston, Shanly, 
MacDonald, Ray, Sinclair, Clair, Reave, Freecy, Gordon, Alston, 
Small, Huthing.s. Childs. Whitfield, Nurse, Duff. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady (Capt.), Curtis, Lawson, Bird, Jarvis, Gibson li, 
Hawke i, Greer, Austin ii, McDougall, Paterson i, Bowles, French ii, 
Fennell, Dobell ii, Fisher, Armour i, Mahaffy, Hyde, Kirkpatrick, 
Currie, Wigle, Main, Pearson i. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD gl 

LITTLESIDE 

SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 

At Lakefield, October 18 

Littleside's first game proved to be a one-sided affair 
in which a more experienced squad defeated the Grove 37-0. 
Showing a very strong passing attack, the School was 
superior throughout. 

In the early minutes of the game, a Rogers to Wells 
pass was completed for a touchdown. The convert failed. 
Five minutes later Wells snagged Roger's second pass for 
another T.C.S. touchdown. Payne scored Littleside's third 
touch just before half-time on a quarterback sneak through 
centre. 

At the beginning of the second half Trinity repeated 
its strategy. Two Payne to Wells passes counted six points, 
and minutes later a Thompson to Wilson pass went for an- 
other major score. Rogers then ran the ball over on an 
end run to get five more points for Trinity. With five 
minutes to go, a Payne to Thompson pass was completed 
for the last T.C.S. score. 

Although baffled by a strong aerial attack, Lakefield 
fought hard, and Russell and Duff played well throughout. 
Wells and Rogers sparked the School to a well earned win. 
L^Jcefieid — Duff (Capt.), FWsch, Reeve, Drew i, Childs, Jones i, 
Alston, Kennedy, Hucklart, Wailling-, Hutchings, Rujssell, Davidson, 
Arteaza, Widdefield. 

T.CLS. — Payne (Capt.), Goodbody, Crowe, WelLs, Wilson, Hall, 
Rickaby, Pratt, Thompson, Rogers, PangmaJi, Huxley, Carson, Tan- 
ner. 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. LAKEFIELD 

At Lakefield, October 18 

The sixth team won its first game by the impressive 
score of 44-0. Starting very strongly, T.C.S. was never in 
doubt of a victory. Whitfield picked up a Grove fumble in 
the early minutes and raced over the Lakefield goal-line for 
the first unconverted touchdown. Deverall plunged for two 
more not many minutes later. Tessier converted his first 
and McPherson the second. Whitfield scored again before 
half-time to make the score 22-0. Recovering another 



62 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



Lakefield fumble, Tessier made the first score of the second 
half for T.C.S. Continually pressing, Whitfield added an- 
other touch when he skirted the end for twenty yards. A 
McPherson to Pratt pass made the convert good. Tessier 
and Whitfield each made another touchdown before the 
final whistle blew. McPherson converted the first. 

Lakefield were very inexperienced but put up a good 
fight. Ketchum played well for the losers, while Whitfield 
and Pratt stood out for the School. 

Lakefield — Ainoley, Casson, Wailling, Stein, Greaison, McCulloch, 
Gibson, Reid, Moich, Drew ii, Ketchum, Falkner, Sandborn, Hepburn, 
Bums, Jones ii, Gillhead, MacNagbton. 

T.C.S. — Deverall (Capt.), Tessier, McPherson, Whitfield, Cum- 
ming, Hallward, Pratt, Campbell iii. Merry, Goering, Luke, Riddell, 
Palmer, Wismer. 



SOCCER 

SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Port Hope, September 30 

In the first inter-school soccer game, T.C.S. proved to 
be the superior team and downed U.C.C. 7-1. Brewer 
scored the first goal for Trinity in the early minutes of the 
game on a pass from Cox i. Continually pressing, the 
School scored three more goals before half-time, Brewer 
netting one and Dawson two. Showing a smooth passing 
attack, T.C.S. made it 5-0 when Barber slipped one past the 
College goaler on a lovely shot from centre. U.C.C. mus- 
tered a power play and disturbed Trinity's smart combina- 
tion. Peniston saved U.C.C. from being shut out when his 
shot beat Ingham. The School scored again before full 
time when Barber completed Dawson's pass. 

Peniston and Davidson played well for U.C.C. Brewer, 
Barber and Cox i were outstanding for T.C.S. 

U.C.C. — Beckwith, Foster, Davidson, Peniston, Thompson, Mer- 
cer, Ramirez, DaniaLs, Peters, Corp, Mathews. 

T.C.S. — Cox i (Capt.), Ingham, Edmonds, Conyers i, Oonyers il, 
Cox ii, Nicholson, Hare, Brewer, Dawson i, Barber. 



TRINITY COLi,EGE SCHOOL RECORD 63 

SCHOOL vs. MOUNTAIN VIEW 
At Port Hope, October 4 

In their first game of the season, Bigside were defeated 
9-4 by a well organized Mountain View Air Force team. 

Farmer broke through the Trinity defence to score the 
first Air Force goal. Stopping Cox's try, Farmer scored 
again not many minutes later. Barber kept T.C.S. hopes 
high when he placed Conyers ii's pass behind the opposing 
goaler. Dawson tied it up when he slipped another shot 
into the Mountain View goal. The Air Force moved into 
the lead again when Ingham, in the Trinity goal, was un- 
able to stop a shot which was deflected off one of his own 
men. However, T.C.S. retaliated and once again Brewer 
tied it up. Then Ward put Mountain View ahead when his 
shot slipped into the corner of the goal, but, not to be out- 
done. Cox i once again tied the score. Now the experience 
and organization of the Air Force team began to show, and 
in the closing minutes Ward and Papworth each scored one, 
while Farmer banged home two. 

Farmer and Ward played well for Mountain View. 
while Cox i. Brewer and Barber stood out for the School. 

Mountain View — Schwartz, Byorklund, Papworth, Knight, Fair- 
brother, Turner, Wheeler, Ward, Farmer, Davies, Cottan. 

T.C.S. — Cox i, Cox ii, Dawson, Barber, Conyers i, Conyers ii, 
Brewer, Ingham, Hare, Nicholson, Edmonds. 



SCHOOL vs. PICTON 
At Port Hope, October 11 

Playing it's third game of the season, the School was 
defeated by Picton R.A.F. 7-3. Whitehead scored first 
for the air force on a header. Clemson and Whithead 
each scored again before the School could combine its 
strength. Cox i finally took Barber's pass and rang up a 
well earned goal. Picton retaliated on a goal by Pickerell. 
However, the School's defence tightened up and play was 
very close. Whitehead broke away for his third goal 
of the afternoon and the visitors seemed well on the 
road to victory. But tricky playing by Cox i kept the 
School well in the fight. Hilden and Wells both chalked up 



64 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

counters for Picton before T.C.S., in a final splurge, rammed 
in two goals on shots by Conyers ii and Hare. 

Cox i and Barber played well for the School but their 

efforts were held well in check by the superior Picton team. 

Picton — Aspin, Hilden, Wallinger, Oldham, Pickerell, Jones, 
Stairs, Whitehead, Clemson, WelLs. 

T.C.S. — Cox i, Ingham, Edmonds, Conyers i, Conyers ii, Cox ii, 
Nicholson, Hare, Brewer, Dawson i. Barber. 



SCHOOL vs. TRINITY COLLEGE 
At Toronto, October 14 

The School played the Trinity College team for the 
first time in a morning game played on the Hart House 
field. The game was most interesting and the result was 
in doubt up to the last moment. 

Bolte, the Trinity right wing, opened the scoring, but 
an answer soon came from Dawson who scored with a well- 
placed shot from a centre from Cox ii on the right wing. 
The next score came from Burland with a ground shot from 
a scrum in the School goal-mouth. Score at half-time: 
Trinity College 2, T.C.S. 1. 

In the second half the School settled down and a very 
equal struggle ensued. Barber soon scored the equalizing 
goal with a shot from a loose ball close to the goal-mouth. 
The College fought back but were held and, shortly before 
full time, Barber gave a fast pass to Cox i on the right 
wing who centred to Brewer, the latter scoring with a 
header. 

Final score: T.C.S. 3, Trinity College 2. 

The College had several brilliant players — Goering, 
Clarkson, Carter and Bolte — but lacked the combination of 
the School side on which Cox i, Butterfield i. Barber and 
Brewer played well. 

Trinity College — Awde, Gilbert, Hillbom, Klrkwood, Burland 
(T.C.S. •42-'44), Clarkson, Carter, Mackie (T.C.S. '40-'43), Goering 
(T.C.S. •41-'43), Adamson, Greer, Bolte. 

T (_'^g, Cox i (Capt.), Ingham, Butterfield i, Edmonds, Nichol- 

.son, Cox ii. Hare, Conyer.s ii, Dawson i, Brewer, Barber. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 65 

MIDDLESIDE 

SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE 
At Port Hope, September 30 

In Middleside's first game, U.C.C. turned them down 
1-0. Proving to be a little slow on the attack, the School 
was heavily pressed. Morganstein led many thrusts on 
the T.C.S. goal, but Ligertwood kicked out some very nice 
shots. Gibbons scored the lone goal of the game when 
he placed his shot in the comer of the T.C.S. goal. Trinity's 
final attempt to tie it up was checked, and there was no 
further score. 

U.CC — Moyer, Gibbona, Morganstein, Tonseca, Rogers, Cooper, 
Thompson, Wise, Kirby, Douglas, Moyser. 

T.C.S.— Ligertwood, Long, Campbell, Gibson i, Scott i, Hughes, 
Evans, Dobson, Lehman, Bannister, Stanger. 



NEW BOYS' RACE 



The annual New Boys' cross-country race was held on 
Thanksgiving day, October 9. Despite wet ground, the 
winning time of 9 minutes and 4 seconds stands up well be- 
side that of other years. It was won by Cumming, with 
Gaunt, Deverall and Black close behind. 

Points won in this race, added to those gained in gym, 
and boxing, go to decide the winner of the Magee Cup, 
which is av/arded to the New Boy with the greatest num- 
ber of points. 

Points for Magee Cup 

1. Cumming 10 

2. Gaunt over age 

3. Deverall 7 

4. Black 5 

5. Patterson ill 3 

6. Hughes 2 

7. Whitehead 

8. Drummond 

9. Welsford 

10. MacLean 



66 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




j^-r^^^-t -^ 



1 ^^ „■ , 



i 




Editor-in-Chief M. E. Wright 

Assistant D. A. Chester 

This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the 
Junior School in our present building. In the next number 
of the Record we hope to mark this milestone by telling 
you something about the J.S. then and now. 

This year's New Boys look like a very promising crop 
and we wish them all a very happy and useful time in the 
School. Our best wishes go with our Old Boys as they 
start their life in the Senior School. The showing they 
made in the New Boys' race was first-rate and they are to 
be congratulated on it. 

We welcome Mr. Swallow and Mr. Morris to our Staff 
and hope that their time with us will be a happy one. 

Our sincere thanks to Mr. Peters for his kind gift of 
two new rugby balls and also to Lieut.-Colonel Anthony 
for his contribution of a number of books to the Library. 

Our annual Fall picnic at Sylvan Glen was a great 
success. Everybody had lots to eat and it was a beautiful 
day! 

The School has enjoyed one special half-holiday so 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 67 

far this term in honour of Arthur Millward. Our con- 
gratulations to Millward on his outstanding achievement. 



School Appointments 

Librarian N, F. Thompson 

Assistant J. F. D. Boulden 

Games Warden H. E. Thompson 

Assistant A. G. T. Hughes 

Lights and Mail M. E. Wright 

Assistant A. W. H. Brodeur 

Music Call Boy D. C. Mackenzie 



Athletics 

Captain of Rugby A. G. T. Hughes 

Vice-Captain of Rugby N. F. Thompson 

Captain of Soccer W. R. Wyman 

Vice-Captain of Soccer P. A. C. Ketchum 

With quite a few old colours back this year, the com- 
petition for a position on the rugby squad is very close. The 
team promises to be a more experienced one than last year 
and should be able to give a good account of itself. 

Again this year there is a large number of boys play- 
ing soccer. Several of last year's team are out again and 
the prospects look bright for a fairly strong side. 



SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE 
At Port Hope, October 14 

Both teams showed some good football during the 
first half of the game and U.C.C.'s tackling was especially 
good. T.C.S. showed greater strength in the line and 
scored a touchdown during the first quarter on a buck by 
Stratford. A forward pass from Thompson ii to Hughes 
brought another touchdown in the second quarter. U.C.C. 
had the best of the play in the third quarter scoring a 
touchdown on an intercepted forward pass by Glassco who 
made a run of fifty yards. T.C.S. came back very strongly 
in the last quarter with touchdowns by Stratford and 



68 TRINITY COLLrEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Thompson i, one of them converted by Potter, and two 
rouges kicked by Knox. Thompson ii and Boulden's tack- 
ling, and Stratford's bucking stood out for T.C.S., and 
Glassco's running and tackling for U.C.C. Final score: 
T.C.S. 23, U.C.C. 5. 

T.C.S. — Hughes (Capt.), Thompson i, Thompson ii, Boulden, 
Brodeur, Stratford, Knox i, Ketchum i, Chester, McConnell, Rogers, 
Moffit. Subs: Bate, Potter, Graham, Mackenzie i. 



WE ATTACK AT ONE 



Approximately in the middle of England are located 
two renowned institutions for the education of young 
gentlemen. These two schools are situated in the in- 
dividual towns of Sudbury-on-the-Puddle and Gooseberry- 
on-the-Marsh, and are about half a mile apart. Their 
names are Southgate and Farthington. 

These schools are bitter enemies in everything they 
do. Each looks for any excuse to get back at the other. 
On this fact is based our story. 

This epistle concerns the head prefect and prefects of 
Southgate. 

* * * * * 

On this night of June ninth great things are afoot in 
Southgate. In the prefects' study there is a secret con- 
ference going on among three worthies. The head prefect, 
William Ford-Smith, is speaking. "We've only a few more 
days to get back at Farthington for pinching our rugger 
equipment" — "Hear! Hear!" agrees John Franklin, second 
school prefect. — "Ditto" echoes Bill Whitley, next in rank. 

"I think this calls for drastic action" says Hammersby, 

"and here is my plan 

Half an hour later the trio emerge from the study 
grinning in fiendish anticipation. 

* # • • * 

At one o'clock that night, if any one had been awake, 
they would have seen stealthy figures, three in number, 
carrying ropes and stealing across the quad. Hammersby, 
who had been practising lassoeing, threw a rope which 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 69 

caught on to the wall surrounding the school. This piece 
of strategy enabled them to surmount this obstruction. 

They then stole through Sudbury-on-the-Puddle and 
went down the highway to Gooseberry-on-the-Marsh. In 
their progress they crossed a bridge which spanned the 
great and mighty river Tumbleweed. One thousand six 
hundred and fifty seven feet, eight inches and three milli- 
metres later they reached the high, foreboding walls of 
Farthington. Encompassing the wall they approached the 
east gate. Outside this in a large, grassy plot there stood 
the life-sized statue of the founder of Farthington — The 
Most Reverend Doctor J. E. Tiddlesby, PhD., M.A., B.A. 
This they proceeded to dismount by means of ropes, from 
its foundation, and dragged it to the bridge. With much 
puffing and blowing they toppled it into thirty feet of water 
and ran. 

Next morning there was much commotion in Farthing- 
ton. Nobody knew what happened to the statue. And this, 
dear readers, ends the story, until just lately when three 
anonymous gentlemen sent a large benefit fund to the 
school of Farthington in recompense. 

— T. G. R. Brinckman, IIAl and P. B. Mackenzie, IIA2. 



ENGLISHMAN'S MICKEY 

The scene opens on a verandah of an English manor. 
Two Englishmen are having tea. We hear one of them 
say: 

"Lovely day, old sock" — "Simply divine", the other 
answers. 

"Have a good polo game?" — "Superb! old cake." 

"Good"— "Very exciting." 

"Rathah" — "Have another spot of tea. old bean". 

"Please".— "Oh deah! Theah isn't any left and all that 
sort of rot. Wait a minute and I'll get some." 

"All right". 

As the elderly gent left the room the other man looked 
stealthily around as if to make sure no one was listening 
or watching. Quickly he reached in his pocket and pulled 



70 TRINITY COTiT.KGE SCHOOL RECORD 

out a small envelope. He emptied the contents of it, which 
consisted of two pills, into the other's tea. Immediately he 
sat down hurriedly and heaved a heavy sigh of relief be- 
cause just then the other man returned and said: 

"Heahs youah tea, old pip." — "Thanks a lot". 

"Lovely day, old chap".— "Rathah". 

"Good polo game, eh?" — "Decidedly and all that sort 
of rot." 

This sort of talk carried on for about ten minutes un- 
til the man who had put the tablets in the other's tea said: 

"Ah you feeling all right and all that sort of thing". — 

"Quite, old fruit". 

"Ah you suah?"— "Rathah, old chap. Why?" ' 
"Ah you perfectly suah?" — "Yes, but why, old cake?" 

"Oh, you know when you got the hit on the head with 
the polo ball; well, I put two aspirins in your tea, because 
I thought you might have a headache". 

—p. Macklem, IIAI 



A JAPANESE BOMB 



My life, as far as I can remember, began when I was 
being dug out from a mine in Japan. After they dug me 
out of the earth they loaded me in a train and I was sent 
to a factory in Tokio, where I was put into a great furnace 
and molded into the shape of a bomb. After that I was 
sent down the line and had the charge put into me. Then 
they put the dynamite in and put a cap on the top of me. 

I was shipped to an aircraft carrier, where I saw a 
great many Japanese soldiers and sailors. Then I was put 
into the hold with many other bombs. One day as the cap- 
tain was inspecting the hold, I overheard him say that this 
aircraft carrier was going to take part in a raid on Pearl 
Harbour on December 7th, 1942. 

On December the 6th., 1942, we were loaded into the 
bomb racks and we took off in the early evenmg for Pearl 
Harbour. We reached Pearl Harbour at three o'clock in 
the morning. As soon as they got over Pearl Harbour they 
dropped us. I was released on an American destroyer 
named the "Freedom" and I blew the bow of the destroyer 




G. G. MONRO ('37-'40) 

Private, Perth Regiment 

Killed in Action, January 17, 1944. 




^ ^ 



LIEUT.-COL. G. E. RENISON ('33-'38) 

48th. Highlanders of Canada — Appointed instructor to the Staff College 

of the British Army at Camberley, England. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 71 

to bits. I am down on the bottom of the sea now but I 
died for the honourable Rising Sun. 

— Shirley E. Woods, Form IB 



VALETE 

Anthony, C. D X.t.-Col. H. H. Anthony, 

28 Goulbum Ave., Ottawa. 

Boulton, W. R Miss Mary Boulton, 

130 Bay Street, Cobourg. 

Browne, A. J. D Major G. Sackville Browne, 

A.I. C.A.T.C, Petawawa Military Camp, Ont. 

Browne, N. G Major N. H. Browne, 

118 Braemar, Toronto. 

Holland-Martin, G. E Mrs C. H. Holland-Martin, 

Overbury Court, Tewkesbury, England. 

Hope, R. A Hon. Mrs. J. L. Hope, 

452 Oak Hill Rd., Rockdiffe, Ottawa. 

Hunloke, T. H Lady Anne Hunloke, 

Moor View House, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England. 

Lee, G. T Mrs. Helen B. Lee, 

184 Cottingham St., Toronto, Ont. 



SALVETE 

Bate, P. C. P Mrs. T. A. G. Moore, 

32 Range Road, Ottawa, Ont. 

Boultbee, Wm. M. H .Mrs. H. B. Freeze, 

Apt. B3 Windsor Tower, 5 Prospect Place, 

Boultbee, J. J. H New York 17, U.S.A. 

Brinckman, J. F Mrs. N. Brinckman, 

c/o Wilson Southam, Esq., Rockcliffe, Ottawa. 

CarroU, W. M L. G. Carroll, Esq., 

1979 Grace Ave., Hollywood, California. 

Church, W. F. B H. B. Church, Esq., K.C., 

Second Street, Orangeville, Ont. 

Dignam, H. D H. M. Dignam, Esq., 

214 Russell Hill Rd., Toronto, Ont. 

Graham, D. I. F W. F. Graham, Esq., 

248 Driveway, Ottawa, Ont. 

Greenwood, D. E. J Dr. A. H. Greenwood, 

27 Church St., St. Catharines, Ont. 

Grout, H. E. S JJajor F. L. J. Grout, E.D., 

151 Crescent Road, Toronto, Ont. 



72 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Howard. A. D Mrs. M. Howard, 

53 East 95th Street, New York City, N.Y. 

Kelk, P. A Norman E. Kelk, Esq., 

250 Warren Road, Toronto, Ont. 

Knox, J. S Neville Yorke Knox, Esq., 

20 Donino Ave., York Mills, Toronto, Ont. 

Macklem, P. T O. T. Macklem, Esq., 

18 Barrie St., Kingston, Ont. 

McConnell, H. C Hon. Capt. A. S. McConnell, 

(Chaplain), Stirling, Ont. 

McGill, J. W ^ir Vice Marshal ^. S. McGill, 

R.C.A.F. Headquarters, Lisgar Bldg., Ottawa. 

Moffitt, R. J Frank S. Moffitt, Esq., 

706 Upper Roslyn Ave., Westraount, Que. 

Pitt, C. N Norman P. Pitt, Esq., 

43 Surrey Gardens, Westmount, Que. 

Price, E. E Mrs. C. E. Price, 

320 Grande Allee, Quebec, P.Q. 

Rogers, J. B John A. Rogers, Esq., 

Aylmer Road, R.R.I, Hull, P.Q. 

Saunders, N. D Fred Saunders, Esq., 

5658 Queen Mary Road, Hampstead, P.Q. 

Shannon, W. D Wing Cmdr. H. B. Shannon, 

R.C.A.F. Headquarters, Ottawa, Ont. 

Stevens, B. C. S. B R. B. Stevens, Esq., 

3308 N. Street, Washmgton, D.C. 

Stratford, G. K Dr. R. K. Stratford, ~ 

Hawthorn House, Corunna, Ont. 

Thornton, J. L O. B. Thornton, Esq., 

3778 The Boulevard, Westmount, P.Q. 

Weicker, F Pred. Weicker, Esq., 

Apartado 38, Toluca, Mexico. 

Woods, S. E Shirley E. Woods, Esq., 

280 Park r.oa 1. Rockcliffe. Ottawa, Ont. 

Wyman, R. B _.„ ^ JJrigadier R. A. Wyman, 

11214-67 St.. Edmonton, Alta. 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



73 



> OLD 



dO\S 



NOTES < 




HONOURS 

Brigadier J. G. (Jock) Spragge ('18-'24), 0.B:E., was 
awarded the D.S.O. for gallantry in the invasion of France. 
The investiture was held on October 13 in the open at the 
headquarters of the First Canadian Army in Belgium and 
Holland, and the decoration was presented by His Majesty 
the King. 

Full details of the citation have not been received, but 
we do know that Jock commanded the Queen's Own Rifles 
during the invasion of France, leading them through the 
struggles on the Caen perimeter and at Carpiquet. Since 
then he has commanded a brigade which has fought at 
Calais and elsewhere. Many letters from Old Boys men- 
tion the magnificent work he has been doing and the great 
respect in which he is held by those serving with and under 
him. 



Chaplain and Hon. Captain R. T. F. Brain ('23-'26), 
who has been serving with the S. D. & G. Highlanders, has 
been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry during the 
invasion of France. The citation reads: "At Les Buissons 
from D-day to D plus 4, Captain Brain was indefatigable 
in carrying out his duties. He attended the casualties 
around the Regimental Aid Post and in the open while 
under fire. He was wounded himself, but carried on coolly 
and courageously for another day. His wound then pre- 
vented him from carrying on, and he was evacuated." Our 
congratulations, and we trust he has fully recovered. 



74 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Wing Commander Dal Russel ('26-'34) has added yet 
another distinction to his impressive career in the Air 
Force. He has now been awarded the Distinguished Ser- 
vice Order for his outstanding service on the continent. 

One of the first three Canadians to be awarded the 
D.F.C. in this war, the first citation reads that he "has per- 
sonally destroyed five enemy aircraft and has assisted in 
the destruction of a sixth. He has shown great keenness 
to attack the enemy". This was during the Battle of Bri- 
tain. 

Dal returned to Canada in March, 1941, and was pro- 
moted to Flight Lieutenant while instructor on the East 
Coast. Posted to Ottawa, he was promoted to Squadron 
Leader, and later took a squadron to Vancouver. 

He returned overseas in December, 1942, was promoted 
to Wing Commander during the following summer, and re- 
ceived a Bar to his D.F.C. in November. The citation read 
"Since April, 1943, this officer as wing leader has led his 
wing on a large number of escort sorties without the loss 
of a single bomber to enemy fighters. The high praise 
earned by the wing for its skill is largely due to the great 
devotion to duty and ability displayed by Wing Cmdr. Rus- 
sel". 

On D-day, Dal took a demotion to Squadron Leader in 
order to take part in the invasion, and flew with Hugh 
under Wing Cmdr. Johnny Johnson. He was later the first 
Canadian to come down on the Allies' first operational air 
field in France. Last August, he was again promoted to 
Wing Commander, and is credited with one of the highest 
scores in enemy planes since D-day. 

Recognition of his service came again when he was 
recently awarded "an immediate" D.S.O. for his "masterly 
leadership, sound judgment and fine fighting qualities". 

Dal was chosen a short time ago as Man of the Week 
by the Montreal "Standard", and the write-up reminds us 
of the many episodes concerning him while at School. Our 
sincere congratulations to him on his successes. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 75 

Ken Bevan ('32-'35), Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air 
Corps, was awarded the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf 
Clusters and the Distinguished Flying Cross for "extra- 
ordinary achievement" during bombing attacks on enemy 
war industries and war installations in Germany and the 
occupied countries. The awards were made last Spring 
and, as yet, we are imable to record the complete citation. 
Since then, Ken has been detailed for some special assign- 
ment. 

* * * * * 

Acton Fleming ('30-'35), a Squadron Leader serving 
with the R.A.F., was Mentioned in Despatches on June 8, 
1944. 

* * * * * 

Lieut.-Col. Morton Jaquays ('22-'24), the Black Watch. 
was awarded the Efficiency Decoration on April 22, 1944. 

* * * * * 

The citation covering the D.F.C. awarded to Wing 
Commander Roy McLemon ('33-'37) on June 13, 1944, 
credits him with "skill, gallantry and resolution" in many 
sorties over enemy occupied territory and over the waters 
of the English Channel and the North Sea. His leadership 
has largely "contributed to the success of his squadron". 

« « * • • 

Lieutenant Dick Wright ('30-'32), R.C.N.V.R., was 
presented with his D.S.C. a short time ago by Capt. Paul 
W. Earl, naval officer in charge of the port of Montreal. 
The award was won for "conspicuous gallantry and leader- 
ship" in action in the Mediterranean, when H.M.C.S. Louis- 
burg was sunk. 

Dick, who lost his left eye in the action, has left the 
service, and is studying at McGill, living in the Zeta Psi 
fraternity house. 



PRISONER OF WAR 



Some news has been received concerning the action in 
which Lieut. Pat Osier ('26-'34), P.P.C.L.I., was taken pri- 
soner. It was part of the assault on the Hitler line in Italy, 



76 TRINITY COIXrEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

and Pat's section launched their attack at six in the morn- 
ing on May 23. There was a heavy ground fog and visi- 
bility was only about thirty yards. Wire obstacles were 
breached after a 1200 yard advance and the platoons got 
through to the line itself, but visual contact was lost with 
Pat's platoon. 

A fellow officer writes that "he is an exceptionally fine 
soldier, and represents a loss to our regiment. I, on my 
part, feel I have been deprived of a valuable friendship". 



MISSING 

No word has been received as to the safety of the fol- 
lowing Old Boys, previously reported missing: 

Flight Lieutenant Will Black ('31-'37), A.F.C., missing 
in June after crashing in Normandy; 

Flight Lieutenant Alan Byers ('28-'31), missing early 
in June after flying operations off the East coast; 

Flying Officer Ian Croll ('21-'27), missing in June fol- 
lowing an air raid over enemy territory; 

Squadron Leader Maurice Gibson ('25-'30), missing 
February 8 after operations over the coast of France; 

Flight Lieutenant Hugh McAvity ('36-'40), missing 
February 10 after air operations overseas; 

Sergt. Air Gunner A. B. Moore ('37-'42), missing early 
in May after air operations overseas; 

Flight Lieutenant Hugh Russel ('33-'39), missing 
early in June after air operations over France. 

« « * • * 

We were all deeply sorry to learn that more Old Boys 
are now missing: 

Lieutenant Tommy Alexander ('36-'39), M.B.E.. has 
been reported missing in action on the Western Front. 

Squadron Leader J. R. Grant ('30-'32) has been miss- 
ing for some time after air operations with the R.A.F. 

Lieutenant Tom King('28-'31), Kent Regiment (M.G.), 
was reported missing in action on the Western Front early 
in October. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 77 

Lieutenant Walter B. Reid ('30-'34), 48th Highlanders, 
was reported missing in action on the Western Front late 
in October. 

Lieutenant John R. Vipond ('33-'38), Irish Regiment 
of Canada, has been missing since September 8; he was on 
active duty in Italy. 

We sincerely hope that these Old Boys will turn up. 



Maurice Gibson ('25-'30) was incorrectly listed in the 
June Record as Flight Lieutenant. He had been a Squa- 
dron Leader for some time when he was reported missing. 
Before going overseas he instructed for three years with- 
out a fatal accident amongst those under his charge, and 
recent word from his Commanding Officer overseas in- 
dicates that he is considered one of their most capable men. 
We regret that Maurice is still reported missing. 

• • • • • 

WOUNDED 

Major A. L. MacLaurin ('22-'25), who was awarded 
the Croix de Guerre after Dieppe, arrived back on the hos- 
pital ship Lady Nelson on October 17. Major MacLaurin 
lost a leg while leading a company of the Black Watch at 
Sinandray in France. 

Lieut. Blake Knox ('30-'34), the Black Watch, suffered 
grenade wounds of the back and legs in Normandy on 
August 12. On October 18 it was reported that he had 
been wounded again. 

Jim Vipond ('33-'35), R.C.A.F., fell from a truck in 
England after completing fourteen operational flights. He 
received a fractured skull, but wrote that it was not too 
serious. 

Capt. "Chuck" Lithgow ('34-'38), R.C.R., spent two 
months in hospital in Italy after being wounded, and a 
further period in England. He arrived home late in Sep- 
tember and has now been posted to Brockville as an In- 
structor. 

Capt. C. W. Bunting ('25-'39), R.C.A.S.C, was report- 
ed injured overseas in July. 



78 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Lieut. Gordon Rawlinson ('33-'36), R.C.D., wrote on 
September 28: "Nine consecutive nights I was behind enemy 
hnes on night patrols. My luck was with me, but on the 
morning of the 14th it was my wedding anniversary, the 
Tedeschi must have found out about it because they had 
a real celebration for me. We got caught in the open 
about 150 yards from the enemy and they gave us the 
works .... I got a couple of pieces of shrapnel in my arm 
and one in my side — nothing serious." Gordon was out 
of the line for a few weeks and then at a convalescent de- 
pot at Salerno. 

***** 

We were sorry to hear that Lieut. Sandy Pearson ('36- 

'40) was wounded in both legs in Normandy on July 25. He 

was acting O.C. of a Company when hit, and wrote to his 

father that he had "got my first Fritz with your revolver". 

« * * * * 

Lieut. Jim Warburton ('34-'39) was severely wounded 
on July 23 in Normandy. He had shrapnel wounds in both 
legs, one leg and one toe were broken, and he had a num- 
ber of transfusions, but word was received in September 
that he was expecting convalescent leave shortly. Hugh 
Warburton ('34-'41) has had bad luck with his eye sight, 
and with a low category is unable to go overseas. He was 
discharged from the army in the middle of September and 
is continuing his medical studies at McGill. We hope to 

see him soon. 

***** 

Lieut. Gault Finley ('33-'40) was seriously wounded on 
July 23 while serving with the Commandos as a beach- 
master in Normandy. Full details are not yet available, 
but as far as is known he got a shell splinter in the head, 
was operated on in France and was then flown to England 
while still unconscious. Later, a most hopeful letter was 
received by his mother from the O.C, and since then he 
has been showing steady improvement. "Skip" is having 
further treatment before returning to Canada, and it is 
hoped that he will soon be back. (As we go to press we 
hear that he has fully recovered and is expected home for 
Christmas) . 







THE TENNIS TEAM, June, 1944 
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TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 79 

We were indeed glad to welcome back Lieut. Maynard 
Bowman ('37-'40), M.C. He was looking quite fit consider- 
ing the long time he has been under treatment for his 
wounds. Maynard said a few words after dinner one even- 
ing — we hope to see him again. 



Lieut. Ian Waldie ('28-'34) was wounded by shell 
fragments in France, but is now back with the Queens Own 
Rifles. Ian had been with Lieut. Al Staunton ('27-'31), 
and before lan's return to the Regiment Al was sent to a 
Reinforcement Unit in France with a cracked ear drum and 
was not expected to get back into action for some time. 
Best wishes for a speedy recovery. 

m * * * * 

Capt. Marshal Cleland ('26-'30) received his discharge 
from the army early in August because of injuries, and has 
returned to business. Congratulations on his election as 
Vice-President of the family business where he is now in 
charge of production. 



Lieut. G. R. Reid ('28-'30) was wounded in Normandy 
on July 25. He joined the Lincoln and Welland Regiment 
in 1939 and was commissioned in May, 1940. Before going 
overseas in October, 1942, he was stationed at Nanaimo, 
B.C. and in Newfoundland, and then transferred to the 
R.H.L.I. in England. 

Colin Patch ('33-'41), Lieut., 'A' Coy., 4th K.S.L.I.— 
England, June 2, 1944. — "We had three weeks training in 

Sussex, N.B were met by all shapes and sizes of brass 

hats and they looked after us wonderfully for the short 
time that we shoved around. We had a certain amount of 
choice as to the unit we were to be posted to, and I ended 
up Avith the 4th King's Shropshire Light Infantry. It is an 
excellent battalion and the officers are a wonderful bunch 
of fellows. I have a platoon . . . enjoying myself thorough- 
ly and have never regretted for a minute being with a Bri- 
tish battalion." 



80 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

England, August 5, 1944 — "I was not in France on D- 
Day but we arrived a very short while later .... I was hit 
in the left foot by a machine gun bullet just five weeks 
after we landed, and am now in a Canadian General Hos- 
pital. My heel bone is fractured and will be in a cast for 
6-8 weeks, with a period of convalescence after that — in 
fact, it will be around five months before they classify me 
A-1 and let me go back to Normandy as a fighting soldier, 
a gloomy outlook. However, I have hopes of getting work 
of some kind in the army between the time I lose my cast 
until they let me go back. Incidentally, I have yet to find 
a Canadian officer who wasn't happy and satisfied being 
with a British battalion — perhaps it is because they are all 
in France .... Rosie LeMesurier ('38-'42) was in to see 
me yesterday, but apart from him, I haven't run into any 
fellows from the School at all." 



We have heard from a great number of Old Boys in re- 
cent weeks; perhaps more than ever we feel in closer con- 
tact with them and more aware of the magnificent efforts 
they are making. We hope they will not mind seeing parts 
of their letters in print; so many of our readers derive in- 
tense interest from such first hand accounts of the war. 

May there soon be a grand Victory Reunion at T.C.S. 
of all our fighting Old Boys. Good luck to you all, and so 
many thanks for your letters. 

***** 

Fred McLaren ('28-'37), Major, 48th Highlanders- 
Italy, Aug. 19, 1944 — "I was not with the battalion during 
the most successful operation through the Gustav and Hit- 
ler lines — because I had an impacted wisdom tooth ex- 
tracted, of all things .... Later I came up to our brigade 
H.Q. to run an N.C.O. school, and have been doing that for 
the last couple of months off and on .... I visited Salerno, 
Avellion, Naples and Rome. I had previously visited Amalfi, 
Sorrento and Pompeii. All these places have changed my 
opinion of Italy, after trampmg through the neglected 
South and up the East coast .... In Amalfi there is a lovely 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 81 

Canadian hotel on the seaside rocks. The damage in Rome 
is negligible." 

Clarke McGlashan ('28-'36), Capt., H.Q. 1, C.C.O.D., 
—England, July 22, 1944— "I am still in England and the 
Adjutant of this unit, as has been the case for the last eight 
or nine months .... I have seen a good number of the Old 
Boys around during the last year and a half — bumped into 
Basil Southam ('28-'36), also Murray Cassils ('31-'34) of 
the public relations office. Gordon Douglas ('35-'36) is at 
present Company Commander in the Ordnance Reinforce- 
ment Unit." 

* * ^j * * 

Hilliard Biggar ('21-'27), Lieut, 2, C.I.B. Coy., R.C.A. 
S.C. — Italy, July 24, 1944 — "I have visited Rome several 
times and taken in many historic sights. My visit to the 
Vatican and audience with the Pope was most impressive 

Rome is very modem in every respect and the people 

are totally unlike the people one meets in the provinces and 
smaller towns .... At present there seems to be an 
abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables which are available 
and make a pleasant change from army meals." 

***** 

Gordon Lucas ('34-'36), Lieut., 14 Fd. Bty., 4 Fd. Regt., 
R.C.A. — Somewhere in France, Sept. 4, 1944 — "I am in the 
best of health and so far in one piece. Just came out of 
the line for a rest, the first in eight weeks. It isn't much 
of a rest for there is a lot of work on vehicles, guns and 
equipment to be done. I am now C.P.O. of the Battery 
and so have the fun of deploying it and keeping things in 
order (?). During the period of rapid movement, just 
passed, I have spent most of the time forward preparing 
new positions. On several occasions we have been the first 
troops into some towns and have received royal receptions. 

Somewhere in Belgium, Sept. 11, 1944 — "Have covered 
a considerable amount of ground (and water) since the 
above lines were written. The weather has been tougher 
than the Hun, but the pendulum is swinging — owing to 
flooding we are deployed along a main highway in a small 



82 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

town. The diversions are many — for instance just outside 
this command post (a reinforced concrete air raid shelter 
built by the square heads) there is a 'pub' with a varied 
supply of liquid refreshments — it is all too convenient for 
words .... The Belgians have given us a great welcome and 

they shower all kinds of fruit and vegetables on us 

George ('25-'29) is still at Headquarters of a holding unit 
in England trying to get over but not having much luck 
.... Around Caen my best friend was a lovely deep slit 
trench suitably covered with corrugated iron and earth and 
together we withstood many vicissitudes. In those days 
the Luftwaffe was not as non-existent as the daily papers 
would lead one to believe. However they are scarce now." 

***** 

Bm Jackson ('38-'40), Sgt., R.C.A.F.— England, Aug. 1, 
1944 — "I ran into F/0 Thomson ('37-'39). He is looking 
quite well, and as he has finished a tour of Ops. he is now 
taking time out and instructing at an Operational Training 
Unit .... I was married on June 21st of this year to a 
Yorkshire girl. She is a nurse with the R.A.F." .... Bill 
was promoted to the rank of Sergeant last December; he 
recently returned from overseas. 

***** 

Lin Russel ('24-'28), Capt., 14 Fd. Regt, R.C.A.— 
France, Sept. 13, 1944 — "I have had rather a varied career 
since I last wrote you and my final disposition is not yet 
settled! I left No. 1-C.A.R.U. on 19 June and crossed over 
to France on 3 July. After kicking around for ten days 
or so I was attached to this Regt. As yet I have not been 
taken on strength but I still have hopes . . . Perks ('35-'38) 
arrived over in England about the beginning of July .... 
I have run into Capt. John Kerrigan ('29-'33), who is one 
of the Troop Commanders in the Regt." 

***** 

Bill Black ('36-'40) P/0, R.C.A.F.— No. 2, S.F.T.S. Up- 
lands, Ottawa, Sept. 2, 1944— "Art Earle ('34-'39) is over 
at Carp for his month at armament flying, so will graduate 
about October 29 or so ... I graduated March 24 as Pilot 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 83 

Officer at Uplands and then took an Instructor's course at 
Trenton and was posted back to Uplands as an Instructor 
.... have been over the School several times in a Harvard 
and almost wished I was back at School with all the boys." 

***** 

Bill Beatty ('19-'27), Major, 48th Highlanders— No. 3 
C.I.R.U., England, Aug. 13, 1944.— "I went out to SicUy 
with the 48th last year and was with the battalion all 
through the Sicilian Campaign and on up to Ortona in Italy, 
where I left to return here to England on exchange .... 
We arrived in England on Feb. 10, and I was despatched 
to this unit where I have been ever since, as a Company 
Commander .... We have been up on the Yorkshire moors 
since April .... I hear from one of the Queen's Own Coy. 
Commanders, returned here wounded from Normandy, that 
Ldeut.-Col. Jock Spragge is doing a wonderful job with his 
unit and is a grand example to all his officers and men." 

***** 

Howard Patch ('35-'38), Bdr., R.C.A.— Italy, July 17, 
1944 — "I do enjoy the Record though I am piqued by the 
number of T.C.S. Old Boys other Old Boys are always 
running into. I am sure I travel as much as many, yet can- 
not brag of seeing any old friend save John Layne ('37-'40) 
of the same regiment. We do run into lots of officers as 
we had to calibrate the guns of the Corps and saw most 
of the regimental officers; but it was a pleasant holiday 
anyway as the site was the beaches of the Tyrrhenian Sea 
and when our work was done we could swim in the salt 
surf and laze on the wide beaches. It was just like a 
summer on the Maine coast, as there were American shows 
and canteens nearby, and we had a truck and the freedom 
of the roads. I have travelled many miles of them now from 
Cassino to Naples, from Caserta to the coast, and know 
them all well. Cassino was a wrecked village, nothing but 
a pile of heaped masonry, honey-combed by caves and alive 
with mines and barbed wire. Even the Monastery on the 
HiU-top is but a skeleton on a blasted crest .... Give my 
regards to all at the School." 



84 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Alastair Ferguson ('27-'35), Lieut., Royal Regt. of 
Canada — Italy, Aug. 17, 1944 — "I must say Italy is con- 
siderably different from what I pictured during Dr. Jef- 
feris' and Bill Speechly's Latin classes long ago. I have 
managed to see a good deal of the country — Naples, Rome, 
Cassino, Florence, plus an interminable number of moun- 
tains, vineyards, olive groves and Italians themselves. There 
is nothing like foreign travel to make one appreciate the 
comforts of home .... I was in England only seven weeks 
— during that time I ran into Bob Keefer ('29-'36) and 
Major C. H. Boulden at the Canadian Officers' Club in 
Trafalgar Square, but no other T.C.S. characters. Down 
here, the Old Boys I have encountered are mostly with the 
48th — our next door neighbours in the First Brigade: 
Charlie Seagram ('29-'36), Bill Leadbeater ('28-'34), Andy 
LeMesurier ('36-'39), Fred McLaren ('28-'37) and Walter 
'Stu' Reid ('30-'34). Also met 'Mickey' Dumaresq ('28-'31) 
of the P.P.C.L.I., whom I hadn't seen since he left the 
Junior School in 1931 .... John Baillie ('30-'33), 'Brick' 
Osier ('20-'26), and Colin 'Weary' Russel ('24-'28) were 
stationed at Windsor, N.S., at the same time I was last 
winter waiting for the trip over .... I suppose I will run 
into other lads down here eventually, and the way things 
are going it looks as though we could easily have an O.B.A. 
party in the Wilhelmstrasse sometime around the New 

Year." 

***** 

Peter Stanger ('40-'41), Lieut, R.C.N.V.R.— H.M.C.S. 
Magog, Aug. 16, 1944 — "I was drafted from the Brandon 
to H.M.C.S. Kings, where I took a specialist navigation 
course, graduating a few weeks ago and being appointed to 
this ship as navigation officer .... While at Kings, I saw 
Ken Scott ('40-'43) and Gay Goodall ('40-'43), both looking 

very fit and doing well." 

* * * « * 

John Layne ('37-'40), Gnr., R.C.A.— Italy, Aug. 10, 

1944 "Howard Patch ('35-'38) is in the meteor section of 

this outfit. I met my old room mate, of all people, Dave 
Armour ('38-'40), behind the lines on the Adriatic sector 
last winter. He had just come back from his O.P., back 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 85 

to the gun position. What a mud-hole it was too! . . . . 
I have seen four months of action. I was still there long 
after the rest of the Canadians had left, until the front 
moved about June 6. Consequently I was not with the 1st 
Corps when it went through the Hitler line near Cassino." 
.... John is now an Artillery Surveyor with the 1st Survey 
Regt.. R.C.A.. "P" Battery. 

***** 

Peter Armour ('38-'41), Lieut., R.C.N.V.R.— H.M.C. 
M.L. 099, July 28, 1944— "We graduated from Kings in 
July, 1942. and from there, I went to Shelbume where I had 
various odd jobs until February of last year, when Brian 
Magee ('34-'37) relieved me. I saw Ian Tate ('34-'41) in 
Halifax when I was joining M.L.'s about tliat time. We 
spent the summer in the gulf and saw the German family 
a great deal ... I saw Arch Jones ('35-'41) quite a bit last 
winter and spring. He was always after me for a game 
of squash, and our keenness was only excelled by our poor 
condition. An M.L. does not offer much opportunity to 
keep in shape . . . .Hugh Savage ('28-'32) is an Anti-Sub- 
marine Instructor here and we bump into each other all 
the time. He is heading back to Halifax in the near future. 
I saw Bim Waters ('36-'39) a couple of times last v/inter 
about the time he came off the 'Restigouche' . . . Wherever 
Bim goes, the war seems to move to that area. I ran into 
Jim Coultis ('37-'39) recently and he told me news about 
Tom Seagram ('34-'39) and several other fellows. The last 
time I saw Tom was in Halifax in March, 1943 .... Jim 
was a diver here, but he got a draft the other day and is 
now a Petty Officer in the 'Chebogue'. He has taken a lot 
off around the middle since 1939 .... Pat Hare ('40-'42) 
and I were up to see Ian when he was in hospital after the 
'Valleyfield' affair. There was a sign on the door saying 
'No Visitors' so we said we were there on business and 
walked in. There was Ian with his feet propped up on pil- 
lows, completely surrounded by fans and bowls of ice, and 
looking as happy as a lark. He was not the least disturbed 
by the thought of twenty-eight days survivor's leave around 
Speech Day ... I had a letter from Dave ('38-'40) last 



86 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

January just about the time he went into action in Italy. 
It was very interesting and very amusing about the swindles 
he was working to get Mauser pistols, etc." Both Pete and 
Bim were recent visitors at School, Pete playing in the Old 
Boys' football game. 

* « * « « 

Bob Morris ('33-'44) 0/S, R.C.N.V.R.— Aug. 29, 1944— 
"Halifax certainly does seem to hold its full share of Old 
Boys at one time or another, I've come across five more 
in the past week. Gay Goodall ('40-'43) at Kings, 'Flash' 
Walcot ('37-'40) at the same place and 'Pinky' Heaton 
('38-'42), 'Butch' Davidson ('37-'42), and Dave Jellett ('39- 
'42), all three with a draft of 'middies' who have finished 
their training at Esquimalt, and are now being posted to 
various ships to fill out their training and to gain ex- 
perience Dave ('30-'41) seems to be having quite a 

decent time at Comwallis". 

***** 

Sven Svenningson ('38-'42), Lieut., R.C.N.V.R.— H.M. 
S. Mauritius, Aug. 1, 1944 — "I left Canada last fall after 
graduating from Kings. There were about ten T.C.S. chaps 
aboard the troop ship. After spending a short time in Lon- 
don I joined the ship, an 8,000 ton cruiser .... We went 
out to the Mediterranean where we spent most of our time 
bombarding off the Italian coast .... I saw Dave Morris 
('30-'41) in Malta one evening and had dinner with him 
aboard his ship .... We returned to England in the spring 
.... We have lately been taking part in Normandy .... 
Had the Admiral aboard and so led the bombarding squa- 
dron in ahead of the landing craft. We were to protect 
the Eastern flank of the British and Canadian landings by 
engaging the shore batteries and any surface craft .... I 
see Dick Birks ('39-'42) now and again; he is on a destroyer 
in the home fleet." 

Acton Fleming ('30-'35), S/L, R.A.F.— England, Aug. 
16, 1944 — "During the almost two years that I was with the 
Squadron we spent sixteen months of it in Scotland in, I 
must say, very pleasant surroimdings .... Last November 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 87 

the whole Squadron moved south .... We were at that 
time taking low oblique photographs of the rocket sites in 
the Pas de Calais and found it both an interesting and 'hot' 
pastime! I was for a time acting CO. but found the job 
exasperating as half the Squadron was on one aerodrome 
and the other half some seventy miles away .... Last 
March I was promoted to Squadron Leader and took over 
the command of my old original in which I served at the 
beginning of the war for fourteen months. I have never 
been so pleased in my life .... Just after I took over we 
got rid of our Mustangs and were re-equipped with Spit- 
fires and the Squadron was moved south in preparation for 
D-Day .... On D-Day itself I was very lucky in that I went 
off on the dawn sortie at 0445 and spent forty-five minutes 
over the Beachhead where I got a magnificent bird's-eye 
view of our mighty armada approaching the cost of Nor- 
mandy. I was singularly impressed by the visibility that 
momentous morning. I had no sooner climbed to 1500 feet 
after take-off than I could see the guns flashing off the 
coast of Normandy about 100 miles away. So, although it 
was still quite dark, all I had to do was steer for the flashes 
.... I made two further trips during the day. 

After about D plus 7 things from our point of view had 
slackened off considerably and operational trips are a bit 
scarce at the moment. However, we all get in about two 
trips a week. Casualties in the Squadron have been re- 
markably light considering the nature of the work. I have 
only lost three chaps all of whom were shot down by flak. 
Enemy fighters were scarce as hen's teeth and only a small 
minority reported any action with them. I myself had a 
brief tussle with six FW 190's with no claims either side. 
They never stayed to fight and I found just by turning 
hard that I had the upper hand. One dirty dive by you 
and they were away .... 

I have seen very few old boys since I last wrote. I 
met Mr. Boulden in London last January and Peter Landry 
('31-'39) in Yorkshire last September, and, at my present 
station Symons ('38-'43) and Syd. Lambert ('34-'43). Syd., 
by the way, left here about three weeks ago to take a com- 



88 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL, RECORD 

mission in the Indian Army and as yet I have not heard 

from him." 

***** 

Harry Hyndman ('35-'37), Lieut., R.C.N.— H.M.C.S. 
Chaudiere, Aug. 20, 1944 — I am second in command of the 
Destroyer, which used to be H.M.S. Hero, and which we 
took over from the R.N. last November .... Incidentally, 
U.C.C. and Lakefield are represented in our Ward Room." 
« * * * * 

Charlie Seagram ('29-'36) Lieut., 48th. Highlanders- 
Italy, Aug. 11, 1944 — "We have already had water-melon, 
cantaloupe, figs, peaches, plums, pears and apples. We can 
usually get hold of some wine so the times that we go 
hungry are very few and far between. For a time we had 
com off the cob almost every meal. At this particular 
time we are getting our fill of tomatoes .... Have not seen 
many T.C.S. lads lately, but about six weeks ago I ran into 
Cam. Osier ('29-'37) in the Orange Grove in Naples. I see 
Al Ferguson ('27-'35) regularly now that he is with the 
R.C.R. He has not changed a bit; his sharp wit never re- 
laxes for a minute. BUI Leadbeater ('28-'34), Stu Reid 
('30-'34) and myself are the only T.C.S. Old Boys with the 
Regt. at present. Fred McLaren ('28-'37) and Andy Le- 
Mesurier ('36-'39) are awaiting a vacancy." 

*-**** 

Lieut. R. G. Glover (Master), Intelligence — France, 
Aug. 8, 1944— "When I left T.C.S. Ted Parker ('38-'44) had 
been one year in Bethune House and Millward ('39-'44) had 
just come up from the J.S. with the reputation of a bud- 
ding genius — very good to know he has continued first 
class .... Recently I've read Wavell's 'Life of Allenby', 
and Admiral Sir Wm. James' 'Life of Admiral Sir Wm. 
Fisher'. Both those men were, of course, first class in their 
respective services — and both classical scholars of merit. 
Allenby could give the original of an Aeschylus quotation. 
Fisher could converse and correspond successfully in Latin 
with a Jugoslav bishop with whom he had no other com- 
mon language. No accident either; just another bit of 
evidence of the value of classics as a mental training . . : . 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 89 

Another first class mental exercise, to which the army has 
introduced me, is the writing of appreciations — the weigh- 
ing of the rival merits of different courses of action. I'd 

like to see that included in the English curriculum 

Normandy is very dry. The Boche appears to have 
done nil to keep the roads in order, and every convoy ad- 
vertises itself by raising a great fog of dust. That is one's 
first impression. The second is the excellence of the crops, 
splendid weedless fields, heavy heads of grain on the wheat, 
much of it sadly going to waste — labour to gather in the 
harvest is lacking; and some fields are still mined. On the 
other hand there are a lot of dummy mine fields. The story 
is that about a fortnight before D-Day Rommel came round 
on an inspection of coastal defences, and keen commanders, 
eager for good reports, strung out yards of wire and put up 
dozens of signs in areas where not a mine existed, for 
eyewash for the C-in-C." 

* * * * * 

Desmond Magee ('34-'35), Major, 14th Cdn. Fd. Coy., 
R.C.E. — Italy, Aug. 15, 1944 — "I have been out here since 
January, so was not in the French invasion .... One ap- 
preciates in times like these what good lessons one learns 
in schools like T.C.S. How to give and not to expect the 
world to give you a living, but above all the comradeship 
of men. I know that there are many critics of the English 
public school system who would like to see it done away 
with after the war. I feel that these schools fill a vital 
part of our communal and national life. Fortunate in- 
deed are those privileged to go to them because they learn 
something that cannot be found in high schools. I hope 
you will put my small son (aged one) down for T.C.S. for 
about 1955! .... I have been on the staff for the last two 
years, but have just returned for a spell of regimental duty. 
My last job was B.M. of an infantry Brigade. George 
Renison ('33-'38) had a miraculous escape when the jeep 
he was travelling in ran over a mine. He was sitting on 
the seat nearest the mine. The three other passengers 
were killed instantly and George was blown about thirty 
feet into the air. However, apart from broken ear drums, 



90 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

shock and three nasty cuts he was all right and I saw him 
up and about a month later, perfectly recovered and cheer- 
ful as ever .... I saw Fred McLaren ('28-'37) a few days 
ago. He was rumoured to have been killed at the Hitler 
line, but I'm glad to say it was completely untrue and he 
'i perfectly well .... Bobs Osier ('21-'29) was one of my 
C.O.'s in England. My wife and children are still in Eng- 
land. 

* * * * * 

John Campbell ('22-'27), Lieut., R.C.O.C— Italy, Aug. 
11, 1944 — "Italy appears to be a combination of Progress, 
the Dark Ages, Beauty and Dirt! To say nothing of Mud 
and Dust! .... I've run into quite a few T.C.S. lads — 
Lawren Harris ('26-'29), who has painted some very fine 
pictures, especially of the Cassino area, and Con Harring- 
ton ('26-'30), who was doing observation work for the 
Artillery, stayed with me one night and we had a grand 
session. Unfortunately I missed Bill Beatty ('19-'27) and 
Dave Thompson ('21-'28) by just a few days. They were 
both room-mates of mine and I haven't seen them for some 
time .... Pat ('17-' 19; Group Capt.) has transferred to 
the R.A.F. and now has his family in England. I think 
he has a Bomber Station .... By the way, are you turning 
out better writers now than they did back in the Twenties? 
I always claim that Fumival's *500 lines Campbell' pro- 
duced this scrawl of mine!" 

« * « « * 

Harry Price (1929), Major, R.C.R.— Sept. 16, 1944— 
"It is nice to think that the Old School is watching with 
keen interest the events of its Old Boys and is in there 
cheering them on. I can say that our thoughts often 
wander back to the School and the good old times spent 
there. Some of us used to laugh when people told us we 
would look back on our school days as being the happiest 
days of one's life — one has to live to appreciate those re- 
marks. Sometimes I wonder if the nucleus of the Cana- 
dian Army is made up of Old Boys. They seem to be 
everywhere and one runs into them continually .... Art 
Smith ('16-'20) is living in the same house as I am at the 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 91 

present moment. Have seen a lot of him in the past year 
and a half .... Have just heard that Jock Spragge ('18- 
'24) has been promoted Brigadier. He certainly deserves 
it. He did an excellent job with the Queen's Own. Am 
just off to pay a visit to John Cape ('24-'26) .... The best 
of luck in the Little Big Four. I hope it is the School's 
year and will be awaiting the next issue of the Record 
anxiously." 

* * * Hf * 

R. E. McLaren ('21-'25) Major, R.H.L.I. — Toronto, 
August 26, 1944 — "I was extremely lucky to be repatriated. 
At the time the Swiss Commission came around my hand 
was almost entirely useless, but since then it has made a 
rapid recovery. In fact if I didn't wear a wound stripe most 
people would not think anything was wrong. One of the 
first things I read on returning here was the good old 
"Record" .... I bumped into Norm. Phipps ('21-'25) here 
about a month ago. He was just leaving to go back again 
after completing the Staff Course. Bill Cummings ('21- 
'25) comes in nearly every day on his rounds as Assistant 
D.S. & T.O. at the depot here .... At the present moment 
I am working at the District Depot, but I am hoping soon 
to get a job at Ottawa .... in the department which looks 
after our prisoners of war in Germany. While in Ger- 
many I spent most of my time in hospitals and as our boys 
were continually coming and going from them I was able 
to keep in touch with those in our area." 

***** 

Harold Martin ('20-'26), M.C., Capt, R.C. A.— France, 
Sept. 4, 1944 — "Life has been very full of action this last 
month and chances to sleep all too few .... The roads east 
of Falaise were a tribute to the Allied Air Forces. They 
were literally lined with dead Germans and horses and burn- 
ed out vehicles. It was a terrible sight — and smell 

Yes, I'll play squash again at T.C.S. as soon as I can." 

***** 

E. C. Cayley ('33-'39), Lieut., R.C.N.V.R.— H.M. Sub- 
marine "Trespasser", July 24, 1944 — "I got back from Italy 
in March and took my submarine course up north and pass- 



92 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

ed it successfully. It was a grand course and if Mr. Morris 
or Mr. Lewis had seen me successfully working out chemis- 
try and stability problems, as well as doing practical elec- 
tronics, I don't think they would have believed their eyes 
.... I'm going to be in these parts for a few more months 
before I got East". Ed. also tells us he was married on 
July Ist. 

-# ^ ^ -fr ^ 

Ian Tate ('34-'41) Lieut., R.C.N.V.R.— H.M.C.S. "Coati- 
cook", August 16, 1944 — "In my recent wanderings down to 
Cornwallis where I took a brusher-upper course in anti-sub 
work, I bumped into "Porpy" Reid ('36-'43). He came nip- 
ping up very smartly (for Porp), looking much as ever, and 
we had a short chin .... There was another chap, also on 
this A/S course with me, with whom I chummed around for 
over a week before I happened to casually mention T.C.S. He 
came out with a "What! — did you go there too?" And we 
became inseparable friends — Johnny Millichamp ('24-'28) 
.... He joined the Navy around the end of 1941, has been 
at sea quite a bit, and is now First Lieutenant .... I hope 
to see the Rugby team's victories cramming the war off the 
front page! — One thing you can be thankful for, is that 
never again will you have No. 28's 'Ace Play' in the First 
Team!" 

* ■* ilt * * 

Alan Charters ('40-'42) L/Corporal — Camp Ipperwash, 
Ontario — "I am on the instructional staff of this training 
centre, situated up on the shores of Lake Huron, about 
forty miles outside of Samia. The camp is made up en- 
tirely of Infantry men and on completion of their eight 
weeks advanced training here they move directly overseas 

My turn to go overseas came about two months ago 

and I was given my regular embarkation leave and all the 
trimmings but at the last minute I was taken off the draft 
and sent to the school of instruction in the camp here". 



Lieut. Art Wilkinson ('26-'30), R.C.N.V.R., has been 
stationed at the R.N. base, Port of Spain, Trinidad, for a 
year and says: "It is not exactly where I expected to find 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 93 

myself at this critical stage of the war .... Tennis, fishing 
and bathing occupy my spare moments admirably .... I 
spend most of my time trying to justify my existence." 

***** 

Capt. John Patton, G.C. ('28-^32) and Major Andy Dun- 
canson ('26-'32) are both attached to the Canadian Officers' 
Party, c/o Base Post Office, Bombay, India Command. 

***** 

J. H. Lawson ('36-'39), R.C.A.F., is a Warrant Officer, 
First Class, and has been overseas since last October, at- 
tached to Squadron No. 428, "better known as the Ghost 
Squadron". Late in August he had been on operations for 
three months, and had thirteen trips to his credit. 

***** 

Fred Wigle ('29-'32) has been promoted to Lieut.- 
Colonel in the Armoured Corps. 

***** 

Colonel Ponton Armour ('06-'10) is Officer Command- 
ing Artillery Reserve in Toronto. 

***** 

Lieut. R. G. Ray ('16-'24) is with the R.C.E. in France, 
and has been living in a robot bomb launching site. His 
impressions and activities include thousands of German 
prisoners, numerous ships landing supplies, swimming oif 
a good beach and simple looking farm boys who are good 

workers. 

***** 

S/L the Rev. Norman Taylor recently returned from 
overseas, and we were very glad to welcome him back on 
a short visit to the School early in October. His present 
address is 149 Daly Ave., Ottawa. 

* * • • • 
We were most relieved to hear that Lieut. Pat Osier 
('26-'34) was a Prisoner of War in a German hospital. 
Writing on June 10, he said that he was flat on his back 
with a cast covering his arm, chest and stomach, but that 
he was suffering no pain, only boredom. Letters can be 



94 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

sent to him from friends, and his temporary address is 
Lieut. Patrick Osier, Canadian Prisoner of War, c/o Agence 
Centrale des prisonniers de guerre, Comite International de 
la Croix Rouge, Geneva, Switzerland. 

***** 
John Abraham ('41-'42) has been promoted to Pilot 
Officer, and is now serving with the Ferry Command. 

* * * « * 

A.C.2, Ted Hungerford ('42-'44) visited the School 
early in October. He finished his basic training in Toronto 
at the same time as Dave Walker ('41-'44), but was posted 
two weeks earlier from the Depot. Ted was selected as 
Navigator, and Dave as a Pilot, but as there was no more 
I.T.S. they remustered to A.G. Ted then did "useful duties 
on the station" at Mont Joli, but expected to go on course 
either there or at Mount Pleasant, P.E.I. He says, "We 
see convoys going up the river all the time and I get rides 
quite often in our planes . . . The barracks are modern and 
we have a good library . . . Best of luck to the football 
team." Dave is stationed at Tufts Cove, N.S. 



Lieut. John Duncanson ('33-'41) "was not lucky 
enough to take part in the invasion armada" being in Eng- 
land at the time. He was five months in England and 
Scotland taking several courses, and is now Gunnery Officer 
in H.M.C.S. Tillsonburg, a Castle class corvette. He has 
run into John Irwin ('23-'31), Harry Hyndman ('35-'37), 
Pat Hare ('40-'42), Roger Holman ('41-'43) and Tim Blaik- 

lock ('39-'42). 

***** 

David Brooks ('41-'43) and Froggie Symons ('38-'43) 
have both returned from England for further Fleet Air 
Arm training at St. Eugene, Ontario. 

***** 

Mervyn Greene ('38-'39) has been overseas for a year 
and has been promoted to Flying Officer. He had com- 
pleted his first operational flight on August 24. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 95 

Colin Kerry ('38-'41) has been having a hard time 
with his eye sight, but graduated from the army course at 
McGill and is now overseas as a Gunner with the 1st 
C.A.R.U. 

***** 

Lieut.-Colonel Duncan Croll ('10-'18), R.C.A.M.C., re- 
turned to Canada in July after nearly five years overseas. 
He was first attached to the Saskatoon Light Infantry on 
September 4, 1939, and was for a time Senior Surgical 
Specialist with No. 8 Hospital Unit. He was overseas with 
the S.L.I, until the end of June, 1941, when he took over 
the surgical services at No. 5 Canadian General Hospital. 
He saw service in Sicily where his hospital was a former 
sanatorium which had been used by the Luftwaffe as a 
hospital for two or three years; he then returned to Eng- 
land. 

Colonel Croll has been appointed Chief of Staff of the 
Orthopedic Unit, Special Surgical Centre, in Vancouver. 

* * * * * 

Lance Corporal Lester Dillane ('20-'22) writes from 
France on September 2 and says he has heard of Jock 
Spragge ('18-'24) many times through members of his imit. 
They have nothing but praise for "his utter disregard of 
self". S/L Eric DHlane ('20-'22) is m France and F/O 
Grant Dillane ('23-'24) is in England. Lester has been 
serving with No. 2 - C.C.S., R.C.A.M.C. 
***** 

Capt. Llewellyn Smith ('32-'37) has been recovering 
rapidly in hospital in England, and in the middle of August 
was hoping to rejoin his regiment in France. Alastair 
Smith ('40-'42), after being a Trooper for over a year, did 
well in his entrance examinations to the O.T.C. at Brock- 
ville. 

• • • • • 

Midshipman Peter Heaton ('38-'42) is attached to the 
aeroplane carrier, H.M.S. "Puncher", c/o F.M.O., Halifax, 

N.S. 



96 TRINITY COLI^GE SCHOOL RECORD 

Lieut. Keith Russel ('34-'39) was one of the officers 
aboard Landing Craft No. 306 on D-Day. This craft was 
fortunate enough to come through the trials of the day 
entirely unscathed, and it made four further trips on suc- 
ceeding days. He writes: "We arrived off the beach at 
zero hour on the 6th and landed our troops about three 
hours later. Jerry did a good job mining the approaches 
and the bridgehead as witness the fact that, out of twelve 
craft in our flotilla, we were the only one to come through 
absolutely unscathed. There were only three casualties in 
our flotilla which was surprisingly light; we expected more 
from what we saw on the beaches. Several craft had to 
remain on the beach for a few tides before being towed back 
to G.B., where repairs were effected with amazing rapidity. 
The majority of damaged crafts hit mines in their engine 
rooms, but most of them are ready to go now. Enemy 
opposition from the shore was disappointing, though we 
did have a bit of trouble with a few snipers in seaside 

villas". 

***** 

Lieut. John Annesley ('25-'34) was Mentioned in 
Despatches for his excellent work in H.M.C.S. "Haida". 

***** 

Lieut. John McCaughey ('40-'41), R.C.N.V.R., has been 
appointed to H.M.S. Baffin. After graduation from Kings 
he spent eight months in Quebec City, and later served in 
H.M.S. Miscou and H.M.C.S. Longueuil. 

***** 

Group Captain M. P. Fraser ('21-'24) has been in at- 
tendance at recent committee meetings in Montreal con- 
cerning Canada's Air Cadets. It was recently announced 
that the training established in Canada as a wartime mea- 
sure would be carried over to the post-war years. Group 
Captain Fraser was appointed Senior Officer of No. 4 Re- 
pair Depot, Scoudouc, N.B., during the summer. 

***** 

Archie Jones ('35-'41) is First Lieutenant in H.M.C.S. 
"Timmins" after having served as Gunnery Officer. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 97 

Captain John Starnes ('31-'35) was in Canada last win- 
ter taking a Staff Course at Kingston after two years' ser- 
vice overseas. Returning to England, he was seconded 
from the Canadian Intelligence Corps and is now in the 
Canadian Legation to the Allied Governments in the United 
Kingdom as Third Secretary. 

* * * # * 

Lieutenant Peter Hessey-White, R.C.N. V.R. ('30-'33) 
and Flying OflScer A. C. Beddoe ('34-'37) have recently been 

home on leave. 

***** 

Jim Hughes ('43-'44) has enlisted in the British Army. 
Before returning to England he worked in the United States 
with the Australian War Supplies Procurement Mission, 
Photostat Department. 

Ford Jones ('36-'44) is an N.A.2 in the Fleet Air Arm, 
and is training at St. Vincent, Portsmouth. 

Sergeant Pilot "Bunny" Austin ('39-'42) and Trooper 
J. D. Butler ('40-'43) are now overseas. 

Bob Morgan ('40-'44) is a Private in the R.C.A.M.C, 
stationed at St. John's, Quebec. 

***** 

Lieut. L. R. McLemon ('33-'36), D.S.C., was an officer 
of an M.T.B. flotilla on D-day. 

C. A. "Knob" Laing ('42-'44) is now a trained seaman 
in the R.C.N.V.R. and recently completed a course in anti- 
sub detecting. He had seen Ian Reid ('36-'43) "getting thin 
on a sundae" and "Mac" Nesbitt ('40-'43) who has been 
taking a W.T. course at Ste. Hyacinthe. 

***** 

Captain Ted Armour ('24-'32) has been serving with 
No. 7 Canadian General Hospital on the continent; his unit 
reached Normandy the third week in July. 



98 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Mds. Tony German ('37-'42) served during the summer 
in H.M.S. "Howe" with the Eastern Fleet, operating around 
the Indian Ocean. Between appointments he took a Wes- 
tern Approaches Tactical course and an A.A. course. Writ- 
ing home towards the end of July he said, "I was ashore 
in Algiers and Port Tewfic, which is at the South end of 
the Canal, just next to Suez .... Algiers was pleasant — 
good swimming and quite hot, but not too bad in tropical 
rig .... a grubby sort of place .... a strange mixture of 
street-cars, modem buildings and Arabs sleeping in the 
streets .... (Tewfic) Some of us hired a ganny — a horse- 
drawn affair piloted by a cheerful soul answering to the 
name of Hassan — and had a good look around .... From 
the time you step ashore until you leave you're surrounded 
by persistent native characters, who try to sell you all 
manner of articles from fly swatters to "feelthy pictures", 
and pick your pocket at the same time". 

Tony was very pleased with the appointment. Writ- 
ing on September 4, he was studying for examinations for 
Lieutenant and expected to leave the "Howe" late in the 
month to join a destroyer for about four months. After 
this he expects to take more courses in England, return- 
ing to Canada in about a year's time. He has seen Johnnie 
Waters ('37-'42) a few times, also expecting to return in 
about a year. 

« * * * « 

Brigadier W. N. Bostock ('19-'20), R.C.E., was appoint- 
ed Assistant Deputy Adjutant General, C.M.H.Q., London, 
last February. 

***** 

Major D. W. McLean ('27-'30), M.C., P.P.C.L.L, was 
appointed General Staff Officer (2) after completing a staff 
course at Kingston last spring. 

• • • • • 

Surg. Lieut. Ed. Keefer ('29-'35) is attached to H.M. 
C.S. Hochelaga in Montreal; F/L Bob Keefer ('29-'35) is 
overseas with the R.C.A.F. in Oxfordshire. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 99 

Captain Lauder Brunton ('29-'33), R.C.A.M.C, has 
been serving overseas with No. 17 Can. Gen. Hospital. 



Captain Frank Nobbs ('27-'29), R.C.D., has been 
serving with the Air Liaison Section, C.A.O. 

* * * m « 

On page 91 of the August issue we incorrectly listed 
Major F. A. Yokes, R.C.A. ('25-'26) as having been award- 
ed the M.B.E. The award was to Fred's father, Royal 
Canadian Engineers. 



OLD BOYS' NOTES— n 



C. E. F. Ambery ('04-'09) dropped in at the School in 
August; John Usbome ('23-'27), Vancouver, and E. S. 
Byers ('08-'09), Gananoque visited us on September 26. 

* * * * * 

Bob Walton ('20-'29) has been turned down by both 
the army and the air force on medical grounds. We hear 
he is doing excellent work at the Research Enterprise plant 
in Leaside, Toronto. Bob is married and has a year old 

daughter. 

***** 

M. C. Luke ('15-'20) is now in Kingston, Ontario, living 
at 200 Frontenac Street. 



Mark Balfour ('41-'44) writes: "We have all arrived 
safely in England at last .... During the time I spent wait- 
ting in Ottawa after leaving T.C.S. I worked for two weeks 
in the Compass Plant of the Ontario Hughes Owens Com- 
pany — a very interesting and instructive job, especially use- 
ful in view of my navy ambitions which seem to be working 
out quite well so far .... The country on the whole looks 
a great deal better than we thought and had been led to 
believe it would. There are some things in the shops which 
we haven't seen in Canada for years, but all rationed .... 
My first step onto English soil I was taken over with the 



100 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

rest of the passengers by the Public Assistance, who put 
us up in a hostel for the night, provided transportation, 
found our train times, took care of our baggage, saw us 
and baggage on board our train without possibility of 
blunder — all free. It was this organization which took 
care of the blitzed families at the height of the bombing 
period now long passed .... The English countryside looks 
wonderfully green and unscarred as far as we have seen, 
not yet having been South." 

***** 

C. E. Freer ('73-'78) — Writing of memories of earlier 
days, says: "The School then was primitive but lovable, for 
instance I was allowed to keep my gun and dog and with 
Famcomb ('73-'77) use a cottage opposite the School for 

bird and small animal culture and dissection, etc 

Famcomb had no beauty but had curiosity brains 

The Masters that tried to educate me were Cooper (Greek 
— v/onderful), Allan (Latin — loved Horace), Highton 
( Cambridge — Mathematics — Champion Lightweight Boxer 
of England — so said), Logan (General subjects and cricket 
— bowling slow overhead — dribble break — on or off), Be- 
thune (discipline — Chapel) .... We really had a beautiful 
Chapel — Cantoris and Decani and a cross on the Altar — 
and Whitney Mockridge ('76-'78) to smg solos to the air 
of 'There's a Beautiful Isle Somewhere'. There was not one 
religious heart in the college, just humanity and sympathy 

— behind the training." 

***** 

Dr. Wilder Penfield, a Governor of the School, was 
given the Honorary Degree of D.C.L. by Bishop's University 

last June. 

• • • • • 

Dr. G. C. Hale ('96-'03), since 1925 Professor of Medi- 
cine at the University of Western Ontario, London, has been 
appointed Professor Emeritus. 

***** 

A Life Membership has been taken out by the Pater- 
son brothers under Hugh's name. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD IQl 

R. V. Porritt ('14-'17) is President of the Noranda 
Branch of the McGill Graduates' Society; W. W. Southam 
('22-'26) is Treasurer of the Vancouver Branch. 

Jim Kerr ('33-'37) is very kindly spending a few v/eeks 
at the School assisting the coaching of football teams and 

helping Mr. Batt. 

***** 

Old Boys at McGill, who left us last year, include: 
ChriF..^ovey, Hugh McLennan, Arthur Carlisle, Dave Mor- 
gan, refer Vivian, Bill Chase, Nigel Chapman and Huntly 
Millar. 

At the University of Toronto are John Beament, John 
Holton. Glenn Curtis, Arthur Millward, "Stone" Burland, 
Peter Britton, "Dodo" Saunderson, "Mac" MacLaren, Dick 
LeSueur and David Higginbotham. 

Jim Southey and Donald Delahaye are at Queen's. 
* # * ♦ « 

Amongst Old Boys at the School for the Old Boys' 
Week-end were Dave Morgan ('41-'44), A.C.2 Nels Stewart 
('38-'44), John Beament ('37-'44), Ian Macdonald ('39-'43), 
A.C.2 Ted Parker ('38-'44), Andy Speirs ('37-'43), A. E. 
Millward ('39-'44), Lieut. Pete Armour ('38-'41), R.C.N. 
V.R., Glenn Curtis ('40-'44), John Wight ('41-'43), Donald 
Delahaye ('42-'44), Jim Kerr ('33-'37), Jim Southey ('41- 
'44), John Holton ('38-'44), Arthur Millholland ('42-'44), 
Dick LeSueur ('40-'44), David Higginbotham ('39-'44), J. 
L. MacLaren ('40-'44), D. M. Saunderson ('40-'44), Peter 
Britton ('37-'44), Bob Morgan ('40-'44), John Ingham ('42- 
'44), Michael Sutherland ('42-'44). 

Other visitors during the term include: — Squadron 
Leader the Rev. Norman Taylor, Lieut.-Col. C. B. Van 
Straubenzee ('22-'25), Sergeant George Wilkinson, R.C.A. 
F. ('41-'43) on embarkation leave, Pte. Fred Huycke ('27- 
'43) on his way to Petawawa and Debert, N.S., Lieut. Bim 
Waters ('36-'39), A.C.2 Ted Hungerford ('42-'44), J. W. 
Stratton ('22-'26). Owen Jones ('39-'44), Pte. Dave John- 
son ('40-'43), in training at Borden, F. H. B. Michael ('39- 
'44). 



102 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

J. A. C. Beth line ('29-'31) visited us in October on his 
way to Vancouver. "Chicken" has been doing a great deal 
of successful writing, and lately has been doing both plays 
and some acting for the C.B.C. 



BIRTHS 

Clarkson — On February 21, 1944, at St. Catherines, to Mr. 
and Mrs F. C. Clarkson ('30-'31), a son. 

Decker — On October 21, 1944, at the Toronto General Hos- 
pital, to Mr. and Mrs. John C. Decker ('34), a daughter. 

Douglas — On February 18, 1944, at Hamilton, to Sub-Lieut. 
R. D. Douglas ('28), R.C.N.V.R., and Mrs. Douglas, a son. 



MARRIAGES 



Defries — Lind — On February 19, 1944, at St. Mark's 
Church, London, England, Captain John G. Defries ('23- 
'26), 48th Highlanders, to Miss Jean Lind. 

Irwin — Paton — On July 22, 1944, in Westmount, Lieutenant 
(E) John Robert Irwin ('35-'38), R.C.N.V.R., to Miss 
Dorothy Margaret Bruce Paton. 

Jackson — Duckett — On June 21, 1944, at Heighley, York- 
shire, England, Sergeant William Harlow Jackson ('38- 
'40), R.C.A.F., to Nursing Sister Muriel Duckett, R.A.F. 

Magee — McCuaig — On August 12, 1944, at St. John's 
Church, Skipton-on-Swale, Yorkshire, England, Major 
Allan Gordon Magee ('35-'38), Royal Canadian Regiment, 
to Section Officer Phoebe Anne Freeman McCuaig, R.C. 
A.F. 

Ross — Walker — On June 17, 1944, at Toronto, Walter 
Solmes Ross ('36-'38), to Miss Leila Mary Walker. 

Warden — Grant — On September 9, 1944, at Shaughnessy 
Heights United Church, Vancouver, John Gordon War- 
den ('23-'32) to Miss Doreen Margaret Grant. 



Corporation of 
Trinity College School 

VISITOR: 
His Grace ihb Archbishop of Toronto and Primate of All Canada. 

GOVERNING BODY 
Ex-Officio Members 

Thb Chancellor of Trinity University. 

The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College. 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., B.Paed., Headmaster. 

Elected Members 

The Hon. Mr. Justice R. M. Dennistoun, C.B.E., V.D,, B.A., LL.D Winnipeg 

Robert P. Jellett, Esq Montreal 

G. B. Strathy, Esq., K.C., M.A Toronto 

Norman Seagram, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. Senator G. H. Barnard, K.C Victoria, B.C. 

CoL J. W. Langmuir, M.B.E., V.D Toronto 

Capt. Colin M. Russell Montreal 

J. H. Lithgow, Esq Toronto 

A. E. Jukes, Esq Vancouver, B.C. 

Col. H. C. Osborne, C.M.G., C.B.E., V.D., M.A Ottawa 

Hugh F. Labatt, Esq London, Ont. 

F. G. Mathers, Esq., B.A., LL.B Winnipeg 

Major B. M. Osier Toronto 

J. Bruce Mackmnon, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. R. C. Matthews, P.C, B.A Toronto 

Squadron Leader Charles Bums Toronto 

The Right Rev. R. J. Renison, MJi., D.D Iroquois Falls, Ont. 

Vice Admiral Percy W. Nelles, R.C.N Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. J. Ewart Osborne, D.S.O., V.D., B.Sc Toronto 

T. Roy Jones, Esq Toronto 

Air Marshal W. A. Bishop, V.C, D.S.O., M.C, D.F.C., LL.D Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. Gerald W. Birks, 03.E Montreal 

J. D. Johnson, Esq Montreal 

Major W. M. Pearce, M.C Toronto 

G. Meredith Huycke, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

S. S. DuMoulin, Esq Hamilton 

Argue Martin, Esq., K.C Hamilton 

T. W. Seagram, Esq Waterloo, Ont. 

Gerald Larkin, Esq Toronto 

R. V. LeSueur, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

Wilder G. Penfield, C.M.G., M.D., D.S.C, F.R.S., F.R.C.S Montreal 

Captain Strachan Ince, D.S.C Toronto 

Appointed by Trinity College 
The Hon. Mr. Justice P. H. Gordon, C.B.E., K.C, M.A., LL.D., B.C.L. 

Elected by the Old Boys 

P. A. DuMoulin, Esq London, Ont. 

Capt. P. G. Campbell, M.C Toronto 

Major H. L. Symons, E.D Toronto 



Trinity College School. Port Hope, Ont. 

FOUNDED 1865 

Head Master 

P. A. C. Kbtchum, Esq., M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge; B.A., Trinity 

College, Toronto; B.Paed., Toronto. St. Mark's School, Southborough, 

Mass., 1929-1933. (1933) 

House Masters 
C. ScoTT, Esq., London University. (Formerly Headmaster of King's College 

School, Windsor). (1934) 
R. G. S. Maibr, Esq., B.A., Harvard; University of Paris; Cornell University. (1936) 

Chaplain 
The Rev. E. R. Bagley, M.A., St. Peter's Hall, Oxford; Ridley Hall, Cambridge. 
(1944). 

Assistant Masters 

Col. H. V. de Bury, C.B.E., Royal Military College, Kingston, 1905-10; Stoney- 

hurst College, England. ( 1943 ) 

F. P. Gregoris, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; University of London; University 

of Rome; B.Ph.; Ph.L. (1943) 
G R. GwYNNE-TiMOTHY, EsQ., B.A., Jesus College, Oxford. (1944). 

G. A. Hill, Esq., B.A., University College, Toronto; Ontario College of Education. 

(1942) 
A. B. HoDGEPrs, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto; University of Wisconsin. 

(1942) 
A B. Key, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; Ontario College of Education. (1943) 
P. H. Lewis, Esq., M.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. (1922) 
P. H. J. Meyer, Esq., B.A.; United College, St. Andrew's, Scodand; McGill 

University. (1944). 
W. K. Molson, Esq., B.A., McGill University. (Jan. 1942) 
A. C. Morris, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N.S. (1921) 
A. H. N. Snelgrove, Esq., Mount Allison University. (1942) 
R. Thompson, Esq., M.A., St. Catherine's College, Cambridge; Santander. (1942) 

Tutor 
Libut.Col. K. L. Stbvbnson, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. (1930) 

Visitirtg Masters 

Edmund Cohu, Esq Music 

S J. DoLiN, Esq., Mus. Bac Music 

Physical Instructor for both Schools 
LiBUT. S. J. Bait, Royal Fusiliers; formerly Physical Instructor at R.M.C, 
Kingston, Ontario. (1921) 

THE JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Pritiapat 

C. J. TorreNHAM, Esq., B.A., Queens University, Kingston. (1937) 

Assistant Masters 
H. G. James, Esq., Leeds University. (1922). 

J. D. Burns, Esq., University of Toronto, Normal School, Toronto. (1943). 
Mrs. Cecil Moore, Normal School, Peterborough. (1942). 

D. W. Morris, Esq., Normal School, London. (1944). 

H. C. Swallow, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto. (1944). 



Bursar G. C. Temple, Esq. 

Physician F. W. Diamond, Esq., M.D. 

Nurse Miss Rhea Pick, R.N. 

Dietitian Mrs. J. F. Wilkin 

Matron (Senior School ) Miss E. M. Smith 

Nurse-Matron (Junior School) Mrs. G. Stui'geon, R.N. 

Dietitian (Junior School ) Mrs. D. M. Crowe 

Secretary . Miss E. M. Gregory 



SCHOOL DIRECTORY 

PREFECTS 
E. J. M. Huycke (Head Prefea), P. C. DobelL H. C. D. Cox. 

SENIORS 

H. French, E. Howard, J. M. Irwin, E. McC. Sinclair, J. R. deC. Warner, 

T. McC. Wade, J. R. McMurrich, H. C. Butterfield, G. P. Vernon, 

P. H. Mclntyre, G. A. H. Pearson, D. A. Davidson, G. C. Bovaird. 

HOUSE OFFICERS 

J. N. Matthews, J. K. P. Allen, W. G. Phippen, J. G. Greig, D. A. Decker, 

J. B. Austin, D. H. Wilson, P. L. Gilbert, V. Dawson, R. V. S. Smith, 

W. G. McDougall, D. H. Roenisch, R. A. Hope, K. Bannister, R. C. Paterson, 

R. M. Kirkpatrick, P. C. Stratford, F. A. H. Greenwood, J. G. Gibson, 

S. C. Edmonds, D. S. Hare, P. A. Richardson. 

CHAPEL 

Head Sacristan — D. S. Hare. 

Sacristans 

I. B. Campbell, W. A. Curtis, V. Dawson, J. G. Gordon, H. A. Hyde, 

W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, R. W. S. Robertson, D. H. Roenisch, 

C. J. Scott, T. McC. Wade, R. L. Watts. 

FOOTBALL 
Captain — E. J. M. Huycke. Vice-Captains — E. McC. Sinclair, P. H. Mclntyre 

SOCCER 

Captain — H. C. D. Cox. Vice-Captain — J. C. Barber 

GYM 

Captain — D. M. O'Grady. Vice-Captain — ^J. G. Gibson 

SQUASH 

Captain — E. Howard. 

THE RECORD 

Editor-in-Chtej—P. C. Dobell 

Assistant Editors — S. C. Edmonds, G. P. Vernon, E. McC. Sinclair, T. McC. Wade. 

THE LIBRARY 

Librarian — G. D. White; Assistant — H. A. Lamb 

Carnegie Room — J. L. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle 

Used Book Room — D. S. Hare, C. J. Scott 

Lights Boys — H. P. Goodbody, P. L. Goering, R. M. Merry 

Flag Boy—]. H. Caldbick 



Trinity College School Record 

VOL. 48, NO. 2. DECEMBER, 1944. 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Active Service List 

Editorials ^ 

In Memoriam — 

Flight Lieutenant W. A. Black 5 

Lieutenant-Colonel F. A. Voices 6 

Lieutenant A. M. Ferguson 7 

Pilot Officer J. G. Redpath 9 

Pilot Officer R. M. Reid 10 

Major E. B. Rogers 10 

Lieutenant J. O. Combe 11 

Lieutenant M. G. Johnston 12 

Memorial Service for Lt.-Col. A. P. Ardagh '. 14 

Chapel Notes 15 

School Notes 20 

Gifts to the School 20 

Brief Biographies 28 

House Notes — 

Bethune ^ ' 

Breni ^6 

Contributions — 

Editorial ^9 

The Teak-Wood Shelf 40 

Fifth Ave., N. Y 41 

Off the Record- 
Writer's Cramp 43 

Unforeseen Rapture 44 

One, Two, Three, Kick 46 

"Silence is Golden" in More Ways than One 47 

Letter to the Editor 47 

Rugby — , , 

Impressions of the Coach ' ' 

Bigside Games ^4 

Middleside ^^ 

Littleside • 

Kicking, Catching and Passing Competition /U 

Soccer — _, 

Bigside ; ' 

Middleside ^° 

Littleside 

Oxford Cup Race 

The Junior School Record ^4 

Old Boys' Notesr— 

On Active Service ^^ 

Old Boys Notes II " 

Birth, Marriages, Deaths ' '^ 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Nov. 10 Annual Oxford Cup Cross-Country Race. 

11 Remembrance Day. 

15 Ross Pratt, eminent Canadian pianist, gives 
recital in Hall. 

23 The Rev. Brian Green speaks in Chapel. 

25 Second Month's Marks. 

26 The Rev. L. W. B. Broughall ('88-'94), Bishop of 

Niagara, speaks in Chapel. 

29 The Conservatory Trio gives recital in Hall. 

Dec. 4-9 Magee Cup Boxing Competition for New Boys. 

8 Bigside Football and Soccer Dinner. 

17 Carol Service, 5 p.m. 

19 Christmas Supper and Entertainment. 

20 Christmas Holidays begin, 10.15 a.m. 

Jan. 10 Lent Term begins, 8.30 p.m. 



Prayer in Use in +he Chapel for Old Boys 
on Active Service 

O Almighty God, who art wiser than the 
children of men and overrulest all things to their 
good, hold, we beseech Thee, in Thy keeping all 
who have gone forth to battle for our cause, 
especially those from this School: watch over 
those that are missing: comfort and protect those 
in the hands of the enemy. Be with them in the 
hour of danger, strengthen them in the hour of 
weakness, sustain and comfort them in the hour 
of sickness or of death. Grant that they may be 
true to their calling and true always to Thee, 
and make both them and us to be strong to do our 
duty in Thy service, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. 

ACTIVE SERVICE LIST 

Additions, Promotions and Corrections, December, 1944 

1936-39 ALEXANDER, T. L., M.B.E., Capt., Algonquin 
Regt. (Prisoner of War). 

1931-34 AMBROSE, P. J., Pte., C.I.R.U. 

1925-27 ARCHIBALD, C. R., Major, R.C.A. 

1940-41 BERRY, L. R., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1 1931-37 BLACK, W. A., A.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Killed 
in Action). 

1938-41 BOGGS, J. D., Jr., W/0. Merchant Navy. 

1921-25 BURNS, C. F. W., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1940-42 CHARRINGTON, G., Tpr., R.A.C. 

Master CRAKE, J. E. A., Lieut., the Lome Rifles 
(Scottish). 

1923-26 DEFRIES. J. G.. Capt.. 48th. Highlanders of 
Canada. 

1916-18 DUMBRILLE. J. C. Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1910-12 EMERY. H. J., Wing Cmdr.. R.C.A.F. (de- 
mobilized). 

1924-29 GILMOUR. J. P.. U.S. Merchant Marine. 

1926-33 GODSHALL. H. L.. Bronze Star Medal, Capt.. 
U.S. ArtUlery. 

1941-43 GOERING. J. W. L., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1937-44 HOPE. F. C, Tpr., Armoured Corps. 



1937-40 KNAPP, D. B., Pte., A.S.T.P.R. 

1937-39 LANGDON, W. H., Lieut.. F.S.S.F. 

1931-37 LEATHER, E. H. C, Capt., Toronto Scottish 

Regt. 
1936-42 LLOYD, J. B. C, L/Cpl., R.C.O.C. 
1940-42 MATHERS, W. G., N.A.2, R.N.V.R., (F.A.A.) 
1927-31 McCREA. A. E., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
1933-37 McLERNON, A. R., D.F.C., Crp. Capt., R.C.A.F. 
1928-38 MOOD, W., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1935-38 MOORHOUSE, A. E., Sub-Lieut., R.N.V.R. 

(F.A.A.) 
1929-33 NEWMAN, H. J. R., Capt., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1934-37 PERLEY-ROBERTSON, A., Capt., R.C.A. 
1928-29 POPHAM, H. R., Major, the Black Watch (R. 

H.R.) of Canada. 
tl934-37 REID, R. M. F., P/0, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 
1933-37 SMITH, G. H., Lieut., C.M.H.Q. 
1933-37 SMITH, R. H., Lieut., British Columbia Regt. 
1941-42 SNEATH, G. R., Sub-Lieut., R.N.V.R. 
1918-24 SPRA(^E, J. G., Brig., D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D., 

Q.O.R.C. 
1933-38 VIPOND, J. R., Lieut., Irish Regt. of Canada 

(Prisoner of War). 
1941-42 WALKER, J. M., Pte., C.A.T.C. 
1937-42 WILLS, H. P., O/Sm., R.C.N.V.R. 
1936-39 WILSON, J. W., 2nd. Lieut., C.A.T.C. 



3n (iHBmarmm 



Killed in Action 

William A. Black, A.F.C. (T.C.S. 1931-37) 
Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

James Owen Combe (T.C.S. 1926-32) 

Lieutenant, Essex Scottish Regt. 

Alastair McDowell Ferguson (T.C.S. 1927-35) 
Lieutenant, Royal Regt. of Canada. 

Malcolm Grant Johnston (T.C.S. 1930-37) 
Lieut., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 

Robert MaxweU Reid (T.C.S. 1934-37) 
Pilot Officer, R.C.A.F. 

Edward Britton Rogers (T.C.S. 1922-25) 
Major, R.C.A. 

Frederick Alexander Yokes (T.C.S. 1925-26) 
Lieut.-Col., Canadian Armoured Corps. 

Killed on Active Service 

John George Redpath (T.C.S. 1937-39) 
PUot Officer, R.C.A.F. 

"Yet can I not persuade me thou art dead, 
Oh no! for something in thy face did shine 
Above mortality that showed thou wast divine." 



^. 3- f - 



Trinity College School Record 

Vol. 48 Trinity College School, Port Hope, December, 1944 No. 2 

Editor-in-Chief p. q. Dobell 

News Editor S. C. Edmonds 

Literary Editor q p Vernon 

Sports Editor E. M. Sinclair 

Feature Editor T. McC. Wade 

Business Manager R. C. Paterson 

Assistants H. French, J. B. French, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, 

A. M. Stewart, H. C. Butterfield, J. H. Caldbick, H. C. D. Cox, 
V. Dawson, W. M. Dobell, J. W. Dobson, F. A. H. Greenwood, 
J. G. Gordon, J. M. Hallward, D. S. Hare, E. D. Hibbard, T. Huxley, 
R. M. Kirkpatrick, T. W. Lawson, J. R. Ligertwood, J. D. McDonough, 
M. F. McDowell, P. H. Mclntyre, W. H. Palmer, G. A. H. Pearson, 
R. W. S. Robertson, R. V. S. Smith, J. R. deC. Warner, R. L. Watts. 

Photography G. C. Bovaird, R. P. Stokes 

Junior School Record Mr. C. J. Tottenham 

Managing Editor Mr. W. K. Molson 

Treasurer Mr. A. H. N. Snelgrove 



The Record is published six times a year, in the months of October, December, 

February, April, June and August. 



EDITORIALS 

It has been said that this is a young man's war and 
that the hope of everyone is that it will be a young man's 
world afterwards. We have only to observe the youthful- 
ness of the average officer of all ranks in order to have 
ample proof for the first part of this statement. But the 
importance of youth must not be confined solely to war- 
time. There is no reason, now that the initial step has been 
taken, that youth should not continue to take a leading 
part in the world of the future. I do not, however, propose 
that the experience which comes with age should be neglect- 
ed. I suggest only that more responsibility should be given 
to youjiger men than has previously been the custom. 

At T.C.S. there is a system which is designed to de- 
velop the sense of responsibility. It manifests itself in 
privileges ranging from House Officers to Prefects. The 



2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

principles involved are neither novel nor restricted to this 
School. They were developed over a long period of time in 
the English Public Schools, where they are, to be frank, 
more suited to the nature and upbringing of the average 
boy. Yet this system has been an essential part of T.C.S. 
in varying degrees ever since the School's founding, and 
has continually proved its usefulness. 

Nevertheless, it would be foolish to accept the scheme 
blindly, without any regard for how it may best benefit the 
boys concerned. It is accepted by most, in whole or in part, 
that the experience gained as a "privilege" in holding re- 
sponsibility, and as a New Boy in- obedience and neatness 
will be useful after we leave the School. Some do not con- 
cern themselves with the purpose at all, but feel rather that 
the system is a means of making themselves comfortable. 
This, of course, is a ridiculous point of view; for unless 
something has its purpose in life — and that does not include 
a selfish one — there is no reason for it to exist. In other 
words, if our system is of no use, we ought not to tolerate 
it any longer in the School! 

Who will deny, however, that basically our system can 
be of great benefit to boys in their later lives? It should 
equip them with the fundamentals of leadership and the 
obligations of responsibility, so that when "opportunity 
knocks", they will be ready to take advantage of it. If the 
system has any shortcomings, we must endeavor to intro- 
duce improvements or remedies. 

The most important and obvious fault is that boys 
may very easily "get the wrong slant" on the principles of 
leadership by misusing or by using unintelligently their 
privileges, and thus lose any advantages and worth-while 
experience that they might otherwise have expected to gain. 
The first step in guarding against this pitfall is to think 
over the principles of leadership. Personal example is an 
essential precept; but so are such qualities as understand- 
ing and sympathy. Strictness, that is attention to disci- 
pline, is another fundamental. Another basic feature that 
we ought to observe is that we can never expect to lead 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 3 

efficiently by fear; if we ever hope to be followed loyally, 
it must be through respect and devotion. It is, however, 
only the combination of all these factors which makes the 
successful leader. 

And so, let us not cast aside the extraordinary oppor- 
tunity which our life at this School gives us, to develop the 
faculty of leadership. And let us remember that after the 
war is over, Canada will look to her youth for guidance; 
let us be prepared to give that guidance with our abilities 
developed to the full. 

— P.C.D. 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



CHRISTMAS, 1944 

Once again autumn leaves have fallen and winter, cold 
but invigorating, has come upon an expectant people. Soon 
Christmas day will be here with ringing bells and children's 
joyous shouts and chatter about Santa Claus. 

We will welcome this, our sixth Christmas of total 
war, with mixed feelings, for many of our families will not 
be complete. However, we must remember that our rela- 
tions overseas have brought a happier Christmas to count- 
less peoples, who, last year, were subjugated and suffering. 
Let the birthday of our Lord help us realize that our cause 
is just, and that we must not weary in our long crusade. 
Our previous perseverance has brought us within sight of 
the end. With victory and peace close by, let us take new 
strength from the spirit of Christmas and rededicate our- 
selves to the task of making our world a free and better 
place. 

— G.P.H.V. 




J. O. COMBE ('26-'32) 
Lieutenant, Essex Scottish Regiment 
Killed in Action, August 27, 1944 




A. M. FERGUSON ('27-'35) 
Lieutenant, Royal Regt. of Canada 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 

IN MEMORIAM 

"Nothing is here for tears, nothing to wail 
Or knock the breast, no weakness, no contempt, 
Dispraise or blame, nothing but well and fair. 
And what may quiet us in a death so noble." 

W. A. BLACK, A.F.C. 

Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Will Black came to the Junior School from Halifax in 
September, 1931, and he remained at the School for six 
years, until September, 1937. We think of him as a slim, 
handsome lad, with fine, clean cut features and a distinct 
flare for English rugby and hockey. 

In his final year, Will was appointed a School Prefect, 
he played on the first football team, starring as a kicker 
and broken field runner, he captained a particularly good 
hockey team, he was a member of the first Gym. eight and 
he was runner up in the tennis finals. Also, he was one of 
the few good players on Middleside Cricket. It is super- 
fluous to add that Will Black was an exceptionally good 
athlete; but he was more than that, he was a real sports- 
man and a most popular member of every team. 

Will was not by nature a student but he did some good 
work in the School Leaving Course and when he left he 
found himself well qualified for a post in the Royal Bank 
of Halifax. Later he entered the old established shipping 
firm of Pickford and Black in the same city. He saved suf- 
ficient funds from his salary to take out the first life mem- 
bership in the reorganized O.B.A. and he continued to play 
rugby and hockey on city teams. 

In 1939, Will enlisted in the R.C.A.F. becoming a Ser- 
geant in 1940. He was sent to Trenton for an instructor's 
course and was commissioned as Pilot Officer in 1942. After 
instructing for over a year and a half, mostly at Moncton, 
N.B., he was posted to Bagotville, P.Q., for a course on 
Hurricanes. Will wrote to the Headmaster from Bagot- 
ville to say how keen he was to get overseas and fly Mos- 
quitoes. In April, 1943, he was awarded the Air Force Cross 



6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

for his efficient and devoted service to the R.C.A.F. Later 
he was promoted to the rank of Flight Lieutenant and post- 
ed overseas. 

Last spring Will met Bob Smith in London and the 
two saw much of each other. Bob asked Will how he won 
his decoration and Will replied "Oh, nothing; you know, 
Bob, with ten cents and this medal I can get a cup of coffee 
anywhere in Canada." 

On June 27, Will was flying a Mustang on photo recon- 
naissance duty, leading a section over France. When they 
reached the target Will circled a wood very low down. Flak 
suddenly hit the wing of Will's aircraft; it burst in flames 
and crashed in the woods. Later his remains were found 
with his disc as proof of his identity. 

Two v/eeks before his death Will had married Miss 
Helen Ogilvie, niece of J. T. Ogilvie ('19-'21). 

Will's loss is a bitter one, so much lay before him in 
life; the School sends its deepest sympathy to his young 
wife and his mother in Halifax. 



F. A. YOKES 

Lt. Col., Commanding 9th. Can. Armoured Regiment 

Fred Yokes was at T.C.S. only one year, from Septem- 
ber, 1925 until June, 1926, but boys who were in the School 
then can never forget his sturdy figure and indomitable 
character. He was in the Sixth form, always doing well 
in his work, and he was a star middle wing on the football 
team. 

After four successful years at R.M.C., Fred graduated 
in June, 1930, with the rank of Lance Corporal and was 
recommended for a Commission in the permanent force. 
He joined Lord Strathcona's Horse and in 1935 he was sent 
to England for a course with the Imperial Army. In 1937, 
he was promoted to the rank of Captain and was stationed 
in Winnipeg. 

Fred was among the first troops to go overseas in 
January, 1940, and he was appointed liaison officer of his 
regiment. In September, 1940, he was promoted to the 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 7 

rank of Major and made Officer Commanding the Canadian 
Reconnaissance Squadron of the 2nd. Division. Later he 
was appointed second in command of the Canadian Re- 
connaissance Battalion. In December, 1941, he was pro- 
moted to the rank of Acting Lt. Colonel and appointed 
Officer Commanding the Eighth Canadian Reconnaissance 
Battalion. He took a leading part in the assault on Dieppe 
in August, 1942, and returned safely from that costly at- 
tack. Early in 1944 he was sent to Italy as Officer Com- 
manding the Ninth Canadian Armoured Regiment. On 
August 31, he was seriously wounded in action and he died 
in hospital on September 4. 

Fred Yokes and "Doc" Ardagh, whose death in action 
was mentioned in our last issue, were both in the permanent 
force, both Lt. Colonels in the Armoured Corps, and both 
gave their lives in Italy in the same action. 

Fred's father, Lt. Col. Yokes of Kingston, has had a 
distinguished career in the army. Our deep sympathy goes 
out to Mrs. Yokes of Winnipeg and to all the members of 
Fred's family in the loss of such a brave and capable Senior 
Officer. 



A. M. FERGUSON 

Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Regiment 

Mac Ferguson was only ten years old when he enter- 
ed the Junior School m September, 1927 ; he stayed with us 
for eight years leaving in September, 1935, to enter the 
University of Western Ontario. 

His years at T.C.S. span a momentous period in the 
history of the School for Mac saw the fire of March, 1928, 
the building of the new Senior School and the return of the 
S.S. boys in April, 1930; when he came the country was 
experiencing a boom, the School was full; he saw the num- 
bers dwindle after the crash to eighty-eight in the Senior 
School and nineteen boarders in the Junior School. And 
Mac Ferguson was one of those sturdy lads who in his final 
two S.S. years did much to bring about more successful 
days for the School on the hill. 



8 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Mac was always more of a student than an athlete and 
his quiet, reserved, dignified character with ever a twinkle 
in his eye. won him respect and admiration. Because of his 
general standing in the School he was appointed a Senior 
in his final year and he fulfilled his duties at a difficult time 
with the utmost sense of responsibility. As Editor of the 
Record he did much to make a success of the new scheme 
of publishing six numbers during the school year instead 
of three. Mac was a brilliant History student and he won 
the Rigby history prize as well as the Saunders prize for 
Reading in Chapel. He consistently stood in the top rank 
of the Sixth form and carried on his good work at the Uni- 
versity of Western Ontario. There he became Director of 
Publications on the Student Commission and a frequent 
contributor to the undergraduate paper; he graduated with 
high standing in June, 1938. 

Mac then joined the British American Oil Company, 
and enlisted for active service in July, 1940. He was com- 
missed as a Lieutenant but was kept in training for medical 
reasons until March, 1944. During this period he saw 
service at Camp Borden and Niagara Falls, later becoming 
Aide to Major-General Constantine. He was then a Cap- 
tain but reverted to the rank of Lieutenant in order to see 
action. After six weeks in England he was sent to Italy. 
In a letter written to the School last August, Mac spoke of 
the Old Boys he had seen, eleven of them; he said he looked 
forward to "an O.B.A, meeting in the Wilhelmstrasse in 
January"; he enquired feelingly for Pat Osier, and he ex- 
pressed the hope "that the coming year will be one of the 
School's most successful". Mac had missed his "Records" 
and was most anxious to have additional copies. 

Mac went through some of the fiercest fighting of the 
war on the Italian front. In the battle for Rimini his pla- 
toon was taking shelter in some buildings only twenty yards 
from the enemy. His O.C. asked him if he was pinned 
down; "nothing like the Hun" was Mac's reply. He was 
killed in action on October 17. 

In his final editorial in the "Record" of July, 1935, Mac 
Ferguson speaks of the happy years he had at the School 
and the many changes he had seen; he was enthusiastic 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 

about the spirit in the School and he ends with these words : 
"To those leaving we say 'Good luck', to those returning, 
'Carry on', and to the School itself, in the words of Catullus, 
'Hail and Farewell'." 

Now to Mac Ferguson, splendid Old Boy and citizen, 
gallant officer and loyal friend, the School responds, "Hail 
and Farewell" ; for him and his fellows who have made life 
possible for us we shall indeed try to carry on. 

We send our deep sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. D. J. H. 
Ferguson of London, Ontario, in their grievous loss. 



J. G. REDPATH 
PUot Officer, R.C.A.F. 



Johnny Redpath spent only two years with us from 
September, 1937, until June, 1939. In that time, however, 
we realized what a sterling character he was and it gave us 
great disappointment that he did not return for one or two 
more years. In his last year he was a member of the 
Fourth form and played on the Littleside Football and 
Cricket teams, and the Middleside Hockey team. 

After he left he attended Westmount High School and 
then entered McGill where he did well in every way. At 
the end of his second year he enlisted in the Air Force. He 
graduated in the autumn of 1943 and was given his com- 
mission. Because of his skill and reliability Johnny was 
selected as an instructor. He was stationed at Uplands 
for six months and had put in some seven hundred fly- 
ing hours instructing pupils. On August 5 his plane col- 
lided with another and crashed, killing Johnny and his 
pupil instantly. 

John was one of those rare people who always see the 
silver lining and radiate cheerfulness wherever they go. 
He was always liked and respected, and undoubtedly he had 
a most successful career ahead of him. Though he did not 
see action against the enemy, Johnny has given his life in 
service to the cause of freedom from tyranny just as truly 
as those in the front line. 



10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

To his parents, his brother Frank ('29-'33), and his 
sister, the School sends its deep sympathy in the loss of 
such a splendid son and brother. 



R. M. REID 

Pilot Officer, R.C.A.F. 



We have been hoping for many months that word of 
Max Reid's safety would be received, but none has come 
and he has now been officially presumed dead. 

Max entered the School in September, 1934, and left in 
June, 1937. He was not a star performer on the athletic 
field or in class, but he had a way with him which won him 
many friends. He played on the basketball team of 1937 
and thoroughly enjoyed the game. He also won second 
team colours in football and cricket. After he left he took 
a course in aeronautics at the Boeing Aircraft Plant in 
California, with Budge Jukes, but soon after war broke out 
he joined the Air Force. He went overseas in October, 
1941, and was promoted from Sergeant Pilot to Pilot Officer. 
After taking part in many operations on bombers, Max was 
reported missing on February 25, 1943. He was flying a 
Wellington to India and presumably he crashed over occu- 
pied France or the Bay of Biscay. 

Max had flying in his blood and in a short time he had 
become a most skilful pilot. After the war he hoped to 
engage in civil flying but that was not to be. 

He has given his life bravely in the service of his coun- 
try and our deep sympathy is extended to his mother, Mrs. 
J. A. McDonald of Caulfield, B.C., and to the other mem- 
bers of his family. 



E. B. ROGERS 
Major, R.C.A. 



Ned Rogers was at T.C.S. from September, 1922 until 
June, 1935. In his last year he was a member of the Fifth 
form and played on Bigside football, winning his second 
team colours. In cricket he played on the third team. Ned 



.TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD H 

enjoyed life and won many friends at the School; it was 
hoped he would have a Sixth form year but he left to enter 
the R.M.C. Graduating from R.M.C. he attended the Uni- 
versity of Toronto and then joined the St. Lawrence Steel 
and Wire Company in Gananoque. He rose quickly and was 
Vice-President of the Company when he enlisted in 1941. 
He went overseas with the Gananoque battery and was 
posted to France with an anti-tank regiment in July, 1944. 
He was killed in action at the end of July. 

Ned Rogers took an active interest in all the affairs of 
his community ; he was a member of the Gananoque Town 
Council, a former president of the Golf and Country Club, 
and always glad to help any worthwhile project. He made 
a host of friends wherever he went. 

On August 1 a Memorial Service was held for him 
at Christ Anglican Church, Gananoque, conducted by 
Captain the Rev. N. R. Stout. The church was crowded to 
capacity and the congregation included members of the 
Gananoque Battery, the local branch of the Canadian 
Legion, the Town Council, the Board of Education, em- 
ployees of the St. Lawrence Steel and Wire Co., and repre- 
sentatives of many other organizations. 

Ned Rogers' death is a terrible blow to his family and 
a real loss to his community. In peace and in war he 
served his fellow men and he did not falter or fail. His 
life will be an inspiration to all who knew him. 

The School extends its deep sympathy to Mrs. Rogers 
and all the members of his family. 



J. O. COMBE 

Lieutenant, Western Ontario Regiment 

Joe Combe entered the Junior School as a slightly 
built lad in September, 1926. He went through the School 
during the next six years, leaving in June, 1932. From his 
first weeks in the J.S., Joe showed that he was an extra- 
ordinary sprinter and he won innumerable races by his 
prowess. In 1930 and 1931 he ran in the Oxford Cup race 
and his record of twenty-two minutes thirty seconds made 



12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

in 1930 still stands; it is unlikely it will ever be beaten. 

Joe never said much about his successes, but he never 
took part in any race without the School feeling that a 
record would be broken. There was the story of the dis- 
trict track meet at Oshawa on May 24. The next day 
someone read on the sporting page that J. O. Combe had 
won most of the events; it was the first intimation anyone 
had that Joe had extended his whole holiday to Oshawa. 

In 1930 and 1931 Joe played on the football team 
making many gains by his speed. He won second colours 
in hockey. Not a great student he reached the Fifth Form 
and left to enter business. 

Early in the war he joined the reserve army, entering 
active service with the rank of Captain in 1942. He com- 
manded a Company at Kitchener, Listowel and Stratford, 
later going to Ipperwash for advanced infantry training. 
He was kept there as instructor but reverted to the rank 
of Lieutenant in order to get overseas. Arriving in Eng- 
land in February, 1943, he went to France early in July 
attached to the Essex Scottish Regiment. Joe went through 
the hard struggle at Caen and Falaise, gallantly leading his 
men in the assaults on enemy strongholds. He was killed 
near Rouen while crossing the Seine on August 27. 

His Commanding Officer has written of the terrible 
loss Joe's death was to his battalion. "Always hard work- 
ing, he put his best into everything he did; he is a man the 
world can ill afford to lose but his name will be remembered 
and honoured throughout the years to come". No finer 
tribute can be paid to Joe Combe and truly we who knew 
him will always remember him with admiration and grati- 
tude. 

We send our deep sympathy to his parents, Col. and 
Mrs. H. B. Combe, of Clinton, Ontario. 



M. G. JOHNSTON 

Lieutenant, The Black Watch 

Malcolm Johnston was a student at T.C.S. from Sep- 
tember, 1930 until June, 1937. He worked his way steadily 




J. G. REDPATH ('37-39) 

Pilot Officer, R.C.A.F. 

Killed on Active Service, August 3, 1944 



M. G. JOHNSTON ('30-37) 

Lieutenant, the Black Watch 

Killed in Action. September 29, 1944 




R. M. F. REID ('34-'37) 

Pilot Officer, R.C.A.F. 

Mi^Wji?. Presumed Killed in Action 




W. A. BLACK, A.F.C. ('31-'37) 

Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Missing, Presumed Killed in Action, June 27, 1944 



F. A. YOKES ('25-'26) 

Lieut. -Colonel, Armoured Corps 

Killed in Action, September 4, 1944 





E. B. ROGERS (•22-'25) 
M.ijor, R.C.A. 

A,/;,-./ ... •1,-r,..., /.//v 7^ 1044 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 

up the School in his quiet, rather detached way, and never 
did his sparkling eyes miss any detail of our life. Malcolm 
was not a natural athlete, but, like everything else he did, 
he gave his best, playing all the games. He won his third 
team colours in football and second team colours in hoc- 
key, cricket and gym. In his final year he was made a 
Senior because of his all round dependability. He worked 
steadily and succeeded in passing his examinations for 
entry to McGill. There he took a commerce course, gra- 
duating as Bachelor of Commerce in May, 1942. 

At McGill he was a member of the C.O.T.C. in 1939 
and then joined the reserve of the Black Watch in October, 
1940. He enlisted for active service with the second bat- 
talion of the Black Watch in April, 1942. From Novem- 
ber, 1942, until May, 1943, he was A.D.C. to Major-General 
P. E. Le Clerc. In February, 1944, he went overseas and 
was posted to France on August 9. He was killed in action 
on September 29 at St. Leonard, Belgium. 

The Chaplain of his regiment tells us that Malcolm's 
men were seizing a vital bridge across a canal. They cap- 
tured the houses on one side of the approaching street and 
had to cross over to the other side; Malcolm was hit by 
machine gun bullets and killed instantly. Captain Royle 
spoke of Malcolm as "a, true friend and capable officer; his 
men relied on him and trusted his judgment and leader- 
ship and they were terribly distressed at his passing". 

We shall remember Malcolm Johnston as one of those 
steady, reliable young men who do so much without any 
fanfare to make life enjoyable for others. In the hour of 
crisis he proved himself a gallant soldier and leader of sol- 
diers, giving his all for the preservation of Christian ideals. 
No man could do more. 

We send our deep sympathy to his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Grant Johnston of Montreal. 



14 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR LT.-COL. A. P. ARDAGH 

A Memorial Service for Lt.-Col. A. P. Ardagh ('22-'27) 
was held at St. Matthew's Church, Quebec, P.Q., on October 
28. The order of service was as follows: 

Hymn— "The Son of God Goes Forth to War". 

The Apostles' Creed, Lesser Litany, Lord's Prayer and 
other Prayers. 

Hymn— "O Valiant Hearts". 

The Act of Memorial. 

The Silence. 

Quotation from Binj'on's "For the Fallen". 

Prayers 

The Blessing 

Hymn — "Abide with me" 

Organ — "Jerusalem" . 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



15 




CHAPELIMNarES 



Go Thou and Do Likewise 

For his sermon on Sunday, October 29, the Rev. Canon 
L. A. Dixon chose as his text, "He that is greatest among 
you shall be your servant". He pointed out that there 
were two attitudes or objectives in life: the material one 
of getting the most out of it, and the spiritual one of put- 
ting the most into it in an endeavour to help others. He 
then cited two examples of men who adopted the latter 
course. 

The first was an outstanding American doctor who 
decided early in his career to set up practice in the locality 
where he was most urgently needed. He finally chose the 
southeast coast of Arabia, where he remained thirty-five 
years, dedicating his life to the welfare of the natives. 

The second example was an Englishman, also a doctor, 
who had practised in Harley Street, London. While on 
holiday in India, he temporarily relieved a friend who was 
in charge of a mission hospital on the south coast. The 
medical needs of the people so impressed him that he re- 
solved to give up his practice in London and to remain in 
India, where he could be of more value. 

In closing, the Rev. Canon Dixon asked us to bear in 
mind the splendid examples of these two men and to re- 
member that the future peace of the world is dependent 
upon a spirit of sacrifice and co-operation rather than upon 
selfishness and exploitation. 



16 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

All Saints' Day 

On All Saints' Day, the Headmaster spoke in the 
Chapel. He told us that after the last war, a master had 
written a play in which the spirits of several of the Old 
Boys who had perished in that struggle, had returned to 
the School on "Hallowe'en", the eve of All Saints' Day. 
After looking over the familiar buildings they discovered 
the Memorial Cross, and were astonished, for they did not 
feel that their sacrifices merited such recognition and re- 
verence. Such boys were happy and near to us for they had 
won immortality through their courage and service to 
humanity. 

The Headmaster then briefly reviewed the careers of 
each of the twelve Old Boys who have made the supreme 
sacrifice since last June. 

In conclusion, the Chaplain read the Roll of Honour of 
the thirty-eight Old Boys who have given their lives for 
their country in this war. 



Let The Lord Enter In 



On Sunday, November 5, we were privileged to have 
Squadron Leader Guinness, the Picton Air Station Chaplain, 
deliver the sermon. He chose his text from the third 
chapter of Revelations: "Behold, I stand at the door, and 
knock: if any man hear my voice and open the door, I will 
come in to him." 

To illustrate his point, Sq. Leader Guinness cited an 
incident that occurred during the period when he directed 
a summer camp. It so happened that a poor lad from a 
neighboring farm had run away from home and was found 
sleeping in a bam nearby. While family matters were being 
straightened out, he was permitted to remain in camp. Each 
evening, according to custom, the boys gathered around the 
campfire, and at the conclusion prayers were said and one 
of the senior boys gave his views on what Christianity 
meant to him personally. The visitor was enraptured by 
this procedure, and not long afterwards he returned with 
his whole family that they might also hear about Chris- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 

tianity. The following summer he stopped in at the camp, 
and everyone was quite astonished at the change which had 
taken place. He seemed a different type of person entirely. 
The preacher explained that Christianity contained a very 
penetrating message which could not only save you from 
yourself, but also give you a more appropriate outlook on 
life. 



Christ and Society 



On Sunday, November 12, the Chaplain preached on 
Christ and Society, taking his text from St. Paul's first 
epistle to the Corinthians. "Let each man abide in that 
calling wherein he was called. Wast thou not called being 
a bondservant? Care not for it; but if thou canst become 
free use it rather. For he that was called being a bond- 
servant is the Lord's freedman; likewise he that was called 
being free is Christ's bondservant. Ye were brought with 
a price; become not bondservants of men. Brethren let 
each man, wherein he was called therein abide with God." 

In answer to his first question "How far ought Chris- 
tianity to affect human society?" he referred us to his text 
and pointed out that the question was being raised and 
answered in the earliest days of Christianity, when the con- 
verts at Corinth wished to know how the new teachings 
affected slavery. 

The text is St. Paul's own opinion of the subject and 
he repudiates any revolutionary character attached to the 
Gospel. He refuses to attach any importance to circum- 
stances, which mean nothing to the inspired Christian. The 
Chaplain pointed out, however, that this was not the idea 
of heavenly reward, for there are implications to this idea. 
Since Christianity is the Gospel of individual enfranchise- 
ment, it cannot be allied to any system which hinders this 
supreme object. But this does not imply social upheavel. 
In fact, the best examples of Christianity took place when 
the idea of conflict with the social order was absent from 
Christianity. Man proved that in God he could triumph 
over his surroundings. As the world became more and 



18 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

more Christian, this mental and moral self respect raised 
the general level of life. 

He quoted St. Paul again in his conclusion : "We preach 
Christ crucified. Unto the Jews a stumbling block and 
unto the Greeks foolishness, but unto them that are being 
called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and 
the wisdom of God". 



Church and State 



On Sunday, November 19, the Chaplain again deliver- 
ed the sermon. He spoke on relations between the Church 
and state down through the ages, mentioning especially the 
late Archbishop of Canterbury, William Temple. 

Ever since the day when Augustus was made first Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, there has been strife between these 
two factions. On some occasions the Church proved its 
power, as when Innocent HI so arbitrarily dealt with King 
John. At other times, the State was the stronger, as it was 
when Henry VIII placed himself at the head of the English 
Church. Since then the basis of the trouble has been be- 
tween Roman Catholicism and Protestantism, and the 
nationalistic causes have disappeared almost entirely. 

In the nineteenth century, there was a new outbreak of 
interest. In the industrial districts of England, the new fac- 
tory system had resulted in abnormally poor living condi- 
tions for the working classes. An organization known as 
"Christian Socialism" moved to improve these conditions, 
and when the working class finally was represented in Com- 
mons by the Labour Party, it felt that its work was done. 
Again in 1930, when the workers of England were thrown 
into unprecedented poverty, the Church, this time in the 
official capacity of the Archbishop of York, William Temple, 
demanded social legislation to improve their lot. 

The Chaplain went on to say that at the Malvern Con- 
ference, organized and presided over by the late William 
Temple, then Archbishop of York, it was decided that the 
Church can never side with any government that hinders 
men from being Christians. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



19 



Christ Came to Save Sinners 

On Thursday, November 23, the Rev. Brian Green of 
London, England, delivered a short sermon at Evensong. 
He selected as his text: "It is a faithful saying that Christ 
Jesus came into the world to save sinners." 

The preacher commenced by giving us his definition of 
sin: "We sin when we do something we know to be wrong". 
It is absolutely futile, he continued, to think that we can 
reform over-night. Salvation can only be accomplished 
through persevering effort. But, until we at least attempt 
this effort, we should not be classified as Christians. 

Mr. Green likened the peoples of the world unto a man 
who has fallen down a well and broken his arm. When 
his potential rescuer offers to get him out, he refuses say- 
ing that he can think of a lot more uncomfortable places 
to live. When God sent His only Son to save us, we had 
the same choice to make, and we chose to go on sinning. 
In conclusion, the preacher reminded us that God is a loving 
God and a forgiving God, and that despite our faults and 
our sins, He is always eager to receive us. 




20 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

' /Sl{!'- 9clioo 




Gifts to the School 

Among the recent contributors to the War Memorial 
Fund for the building of the new Chapel, are: 

Mrs. J. E. McMullen, Vancouver 
Harold H. Leather ('09-'ll), Hamilton 
The Rev. Walter H. White ('81-'87), Ottawa 
Col. A. L. S. Mills, Montreal 
Mrs. H. Y. Russel, Montreal 
Lieut. O. K. S. Russel ('34-'39), R.C.N.V.R. 
Mrs. Mary Dobell, Montreal 
Mrs. Elizabeth Hingston, Montreal 
Hartley Howard ('25-'27), Washmgton, D.C. 
(in memory of Jim McMullen) 

Among contributors to the Endowment and Memorial 
Fund are: 

R. P. Jellett ('92-'97), Montreal 
Mrs. Mary Dobell, Montreal 

* m * * * 

Mr. Arthur Bethune ('84-'92) has given the School a 
microscope which originally belonged to Peter Perry ('66- 

'72). 

***** 

Articles of clothing and athletic equipment have been 
given by Mrs. Gordon Osier, General G. S. Cartwright, 
John Holton, and Peter Armour. 

• • • * • 

A book of Wager records, the Gotterdamerung Suite, 
has been given by Mr. and Mrs. George Kirkpatrick. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 21 

Congratulations from the School 

The School extends its congratulations to Air Marshal 
W. A. Bishop on his being invested by His Excellency the 
Governor General with the insignia of the Companion of 
the Most Honorable Order of the Bath. 

Air Marshal Bishop already holds the V.C., D.S.O. and 
Bar, M.C., and D.F.C. He was awarded the C.B. in the 
King's birthday honours. 

We have lately been reading enthusiastic reviews of 
Air Marshal Bishop's book, "The Air Age", which has just 
been published. 

***** 

We congratulate the Rev. F. J. Sawers, M.A., on being 
appointed Archdeacon of York. Archdeacon Sawers, now 
Rector of St. Matthews, Toronto, was a master at T.C.S. 
whom many Old Boys remember with affection. He is a 
most welcome visitor whose sermons are much appreciated, 
and he has served the Church with distinction. 



Visit of the Rev. Brian Green 

On Thursday, November 23, the Senior School gather- 
ed in the gymnasium to hear a talk by the Rev. Brian Green 
on the Robot Blitz. As vicar of a London Parish and as 
Chaplain to Anti-Aircraft Headquarters, he has had many 
opportunities to witness both the results and the counter- 
measures taken against this latest phase of warfare. He 
has been lecturing for the last two and a half months on 
the subject to students and troops throughout Canada. 

Mr. Green went into considerable detail concerning the 
V 1, V 2 and the theory of defense known as Radar Mech- 
anical Gunnery. In a most interesting and telling fashion 
he gave us a detailed picture of the effect of buzz bombs 
and V 2 weapons on England. We are very greatly in- 
debted to Mr. Green for having interrupted his busy sche- 
dule to visit the School. 



22 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Piano Recital 

It was a great privilege for the School on the evening 
of November 15 to hear a recital by Ross Pratt, eminent 
Canadian Concert Pianist. We were treated to a magni- 
ficent display of virtuosity and marvellous interpretation, 
with the result that Mr. Pratt was persuaded to play two 
encores. 

The programme was as follows: — 

Chaconne Handel 

Sonata in A — 

Sonata in F. Sharp minor — 

Sonata in D Scarlatti 

Chromatic Fantasie and Fugue Bach 

Etudes Symponiques Shumann 

Jeux d'eau Ravel 

Four Fairy Tales — op. 26 no. 3, op. 51 no. 5, 

op. 9 no. 3, op. 26 no. 2 Debussy 

Encores 

Prelude in G minor Rachmaninoff 

Mouvement Perpetuel Poulenc 



Mr. Molson's Illness 

We regret to announce the illness of Mr. W. K. Mol- 
son. He was stricken by a sudden attack of double pneu- 
monia, and although he has been very ill, we are glad to 
be able to report that his condition is now much improved. 
His loss to the "Record" has been keenly felt and we join 
in wishing him a speedy and complete recovery. During 
his absence, Mr. A. B. Key has kindly taken over the posi- 
tion of Managing Editor. 



Discussion of War Policy 

On December 1 a meeting was held in Hall to discuss 
the policy of the Government concerning the Army. Three 
quarters of the Senior School was present and over thirty 
boys made speeches, some of them very good ones. The 
Headmaster was in the chair and opened the meeting by 
explaining the peculiar position of Canada, not yet a hun- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 23 

dred years old as a confederation of Provinces, containing 
representatives of most European races, and still pretty 
close to the pioneer stage of development when every man 
was isolated and his ideas bounded by his own fields. Ma- 
terial progress had leapt ahead of sound development as 
citizens. The twin problems facing us were how to keep 
a strong army overseas and at the same time maintain a 
united workshop and training ground at home. 

Currie gave a well reasoned and documented plea for 
tolerance and encouragement of the better elements in the 
country. He thought we should back Senator Bouchard 
who was the first French-Canadian to state publicly some 
of the wrong doings of his fellow countrymen. Wade spoke 
of the natural hostility felt by minorities. Huycke said 
French Canada had been conquered, French-Canadians had 
been given the liberties of citizens and they must do their 
duty as citizens. Langdon thought civil war would cure 
our evils and result in a firmly united country; witness 
Russia, Spain, the United States. Paterson and Hope 
wanted the Catholic Church to adopt a more enlightened 
view. Vernon thought education should be nationally con- 
trolled and White and Stokes were in favour of the volun- 
tary method; Bronfman spoke of the wrong lead given in 
Quebec, while Dawson wanted firmness one way or the 
other, claiming the exploitation of the French-Canadians. 
Gillan mentioned the problems facing French-Canadians and 
Butterfield gave two strongly worded speeches urging 
everyone to get behind the army and bring the war to an 
end so that there could be developed a real unity of nations. 
Butterfield's remarks were to the point and delivered with 
emphasis and deep feeling. Dobell pointed out the three 
alternatives facing the nation, while Pearson supported the 
Government in its dilemma, believing the Prime Minister 
to be sincere and doing his best to hold country and army 
together. Many others also contributed to the discussion. 

A vote was taken resulting in seventy-seven for total 
overseas conscription, forty-six for the present partial con- 
scription plan, and three for the volunteer method. The 
meeting then adjourned. 



24 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

New Boys' Hallowe'en Party 

The annual Seniors' and Prefects' party for the New 
Boys was held on Tuesday, October 31. As usual, the lat- 
ter were divided into Houses for the obstacle race in the 
gymnasium and the apple- (?) ducking in the pool. Both 
events were extremely closely contested, with the obstacle 
race resulting in a tie, a decision which drew the customary 
deluge of cheers and boos from the different sections of 
the audience, and Brent House winning the contest in the 
pool by the slim margin of two apples: 257-255. Never 
before had there been such close competition. 

After these events, the whole School retreated (slow 
march, of course!) to the Dining Hall where Mrs. Wilkin 
had prepared refreshments. 



The Victorj' Loan Draw 



On Wednesday, November 15, the draw for bonds and 
certificates in connection with the Seventh Victory Loan 
was held after supper in the Hall. A total of three hun- 
dred and twenty-one dollars was contributed to the Loan, 
one hundred and ninety of which came from Bethune, one 
hundred from Brent and the remainder from the masters. 
This represents an increase of very nearly one hundred 
dollars over last year. 

Morgan ii, blindfolded by a somewhat dubious looking 
scarf, made the draw, assisted by the Prefects. Four fifty 
dollar bonds were won by Mr. Key, Austin ii, Langdon and 
Deverall. Mr. Hodgetts (who also carried off a ten dollar 
certificate), Gill. Ingham and Wigle departed with twenty 
dollar War Savings Certificates, while the remaining four 
ten dollar and six five dollar Certificates, plus one dollar in 
War Savings Stamps were distributed evenly, although we 
might mention that Col. de Bury continued his success of 
last year by winning two of them. Again, strangely 
enough, the Masters have carried off a major share of the 
prizes in proportion to their number. We realize that they 
are above reproach, but we can wonder! 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 25 

Half-Term Break 

On Monday, November 6, the approximately eighty 
boys who remained at the School for the Half-Term break 
celebrated a whole holiday by hiking out to the Ski Camp. 
An excellent meal was served by the Headmaster and his 
assistants, and even late-comers were well fed. After lunch 
the boys went off on their own and everyone was back at 
the School for supper. In the evening there was movie 
leave to attend "The White Cliffs of Dover". 



Movies in Hall 

The first movie of the year, James Hilton's popular 
"Lost Horizon", was shown in the Hall on November 4, 
with selected shorts. It was greatly appreciated, especially 
since the sound and projection are almost perfect this year. 

We have also been fortunate in securing films relating 
to our military studies, and on November 16 these were pre- 
sented. The subjects chosen were First Aid (in techni- 
colour, much to the mortification of certain individuals), 
Leadership and Discipline, and Map Reading. These movies 
proved very instructive and we hope to see more of them 
in the future. 



Messages to the Football Team 

Messages of good wishes to the football team were re- 
ceived from no less than fifteen Old Boys on Active Service, 
twelve of them overseas. The members of the team were 
very much touched by such thoughtfulness and we only 
wish we could have "done the trick". 



Names in Hall 



The names of all the Prefects from the founding of 
the School to last year have now been lettered on the 
panelling of the dais at the east end of the Hall. This year 
the names of those who were Prefects from 1902 until 1929 
were added and it is hoped that the Old Boys concerned 
will send subscriptions toward the cost of this work. 



26 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

One year, 1869-1870, is blank, as the names of the Pre- 
fects for that year are not recorded, and so far no Old Boy 
has been able to remember them. We are still hoping to 
discover their names. 



Music Hours 



Since we last went to press, there have been three more 
music hours on Friday nights, and each time the attendance 
has been large with the programmes continuing to grow 
in popularity. Excerpts from symphonies of Mozart, Tschai- 
kowsky and others have been played, and by way of con- 
trast, there have been many more modern classics such as 
a piano arrangement of "Summertime" from Porgy and 
Bess, and a modem, but structurally none the less perfect 
fugue in the lighter vein called "Bach Goes To Town". 

Butterfield is to be congratulated on the way he is 
planning and conducting these evenings. 



Life-Saving Classes 

Life-saving classes are once again being conducted 
under the watchful eyes of six qualified instructors. Ap- 
proximately eighty boys are attempting to gain their Inter- 
mediate Certificates which all boys in the School must have, 
and the tests are to be held before Christmas. 



Military Studies 

Special Bren Gun classes have been organized and to 
date forty boys have qualified, with another eighty taking 
the exam on December 13. As is the case with life-saving, 
the instructors are members of the student body and should 
be highly commended for their contribution to our military 

studies programme. 

• • • • « 

Signalling, both semaphore and morse, is the most 
popular of the military studies classes and a large number 
of boys are trying for their Cadet and Advanced Morse 
Certificates under the able direction of Mr. Batt assisted by 
army instructors from Kingston. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 27 

Political Science Club 

The first meeting of the PoUtical Science Club for the 
year 1944-45 was held in the Guild Room on November 12. 
The ten members remaining from last year's group attend- 
ed. Dobell i presided as President, and Pearson i occupied 
the Secretary's chair. Greenwood was elected Treasurer 
and the Headmaster was returned as Honorary President. 
Eighteen applications from those wishing to join the Club 
were discussed, with ten new members finally being elected. 

This year the Club intends to base its discussions on 
the book, "Problems of Canadian Unity", a volume of 
speeches given by eminent Canadians to the Canadian In- 
stitute of Political Science. This new arrangement will, we 
feel, give a firmer basis and a greater coherence to the 
meetings throughout the year. 



Advisee Soccer 



Advisee soccer was in full swing for over a week when 
the first snow came on the last day of November. Many 
close struggles had taken place and at the time of writing 
Mr. Maier's team is the only unbeaten, untied and unscored 
upon team. 




28 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES 

(Continued from the last issue) 

McLENNAN, H.— Quebec's ambassador to T.C.S. stormed 
in one fine day in 1942 in the person of H. McLennan, 
from the first loudly protecting the finer qualities of the 
French-Canadians. "Mac" was always ready to stab any- 
body who slandered our friends from Quebec and he 
spent his time throwing knives very expertly at the un- 
fortunate personages who were unaware of his sym- 
pathies. "Mac" was what is commonly known as a 
"brain" and although not naturally inclined towards 
sports, was an enthusiastic skier. However, he really 
found his niche in the Bethune House Common Room, 
where, besides fulfilling many other functions such as 
chief "brawler", he was officially president of the "8.20 
dash". "Mac's" hobby was inventing weird and won- 
drous scientific oddities, the most famous of which was 
his "Silicon Man", over whose invention he spent hours 
of concentrated study. Although he was only with us 
for two years, "Mac" made many friends, and we know 
that the best wishes of all follow hhn to McGill, where he 
is now working amongst many staunch supporters of his 
cause. 



MILLAR, H. D. — "Out, out, damned spot", Chester would 
yell dementedly. But after each flurry, Huntly would 
return with fiendish glee to the torment. When not 
annoying Chester, Huntly was sure to be found in his 
room. Here, amongst countless electrical apparatus, he 
and Charlie Chase manufactured the renowned T.C.S. 
broadcasting station. The only other habitat of Huntly's 
was the playing field, where, in hot weather or in cold, 
he and Charlie could be seen taking their daily exercise 
by tossing about a football. It is rumoured that Huntly 
has developed a new type of pass but it is still on the 
secret list. In class he shone at R.K. where his marks 
were always far above average (?). Also fond of tra- 
velling. Huntly took a short trip to Toronto during the 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 29 

Upper School Examinations two years ago, and so skil- 
fully did he arrange things, that he did not have to re- 
turn to School again that year! For all this, however, 
Huntly was one of the best students in VIA (2), a tire- 
less skier and a pillar of strength in the band. We feel 
confident that he will achieve success in his studies at 
McGill. 



MILLHOLLAND, A. S.— For his first two weeks, Arthur 
was to be seen only in the Common Room, into which he 
disappeared with his precious violin case. Rumours have 
circulated as to the content of this case, but it certainly 
was not a violin! Who will forget his soul-stirring ser- 
mons on "sacrificing now for future success" addressed 
to a spell-bound audience in the murky depths of the re- 
treat for lovers of pipes. "Dutch" was nevertheless one 
of the best linesmen this School has ever seen, earning 
in two successful seasons his First Team Colours, a Dis- 
tinction Cap and a place on the All-Star Team. Art also 
made a name for himself in basketball circles, which he 
deserted quite unwillingly and heroically in his last year 
to devote himself to his studies ( ?) . He is now awaiting 
call for the U.S. forces, in which venture we wish him 
every success. Rock 'em and sock 'em Dutch! 



MORGAN, R. E. S. — Imagine a charging express train bear- 
ing down upon you. Bob on the Soccer field easily fitted 
this description. At least the people whom he hit felt 
that way, and there were lots of them! For his intense 
interest and determination. Bob was, in his last year, 
elected Captain of Soccer; he also won his Middleside 
hockey colours and was made a House Officer. Bob had 
definite political affiliations and was one of the School's 
most confirmed "reactionaries"! He spent most of his 
four years here as official C.C.F. ambassador without 
portfollio. In keeping with his political ideas, he used to 
spend lots of time in his "cell" in the Used Book Room. 
To get an idea of how Bob used to debate, all we have 



30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

to imagine is the same engine, having being stoked 
vigorously, blowing off quantities of steam from time to 
time. When Bob left us last June, he hoped to join the 
Merchant Marine but was unsuccessful; he is now in the 
R.C.A.M.C. where we wish him the best of luck, but re- 
mind him to be tender with the v/ounded! 



ROSE, J. F. — "Rosey" first achieved notoriety in the School 
as a vicious tackier, and his fine work as inside in the 
Ridley game will be long remembered. At the close of 
the football season he retired to the Common Room, only 
leaving it for classes and to sleep. Here he took a lead- 
ing part in keeping things clean and neat, and often 
"Rosey" was to be seen in bare feet scrubbing the floor. 
with his pipe firmly clenched between his teeth. In an 
argument, he was never outdone, and indeed it took long 
and continued effort on his part to proclaim the superio- 
rity of Brazil over the other countries of the world ! After 
Easter, he left us to join the R.C.A.F., but since our loss 
is the Air Force's gain, we can only wish him continued 
success in the future. 



WISENER, R. A.— "Buzz, buzz, buzz went the buzzer". 
"Five'll get you ten" he never had a beard, but the ex- 
cuse was good enough to deprive Mr. Scott of his precious 
ten to one news. Besides establishing this reputation, 
Bob was known as captain of Middleside hockey and 
cricket, and a member of Bigside football and the squash 
team. He was also awarded the Cup for Keenness in 
Athletics. He carried on a constant feud with Bovaird 
and Fisher on the tennis courts, and it is rumoured that 
he followed Fisher to the Naval College to continue the 
struggle. We wish him the best of luck in the navy and 
hope that life under Senior Classman Phillips will not 
cause him to lose his rosy complexion! 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 

Houpe*Note§ 



BETHUNE 

Ode to Bethime 

You talk about your heroes, 
Your glorious bottom flat, 
But we've got more for you in store, 
And now we'll tell you what. 

We've got the best location, 
A view for all to see; 
Look out upon the countryside 
And listen here to me. 

The gentlemen (?) in Brent House, 
For years have tried to dodge 
The fact, that when they look outside. 
There's nothing but the Lodge. 

Or take perhaps the other side, 
The noisier of the two; 
When you're going down to classes 
All the boys vv^ill shout at vou. 

"Yah, Bethune faust", they always say. 
But this is quite absurd. 

For "Brent" and "faust" have always been 
Connected in one word. 

The two just seem to go together 
As natural as can be, 
For Bethune has two syllables 
As far as I can see. 

When sun goes down and moon comes out 
And all are through with work. 
You come up from the classroom block, 
And stop with quite a jerk. 

On your left you see a maze of light, 
The noise is simply frightful; 



32 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

The rowdies in that awful place, 
They think its quite delightful. 

Ahead is stately Bethune House, 
No noise from it doth come, 
And all is such a lovely change 
From Brent's unpleasant hum. 

The corridors are quiet. 
They are not splashed with light; 
For the sons of aristocracy. 
They seem to think its right. 

We're all one happy family, 
Our top and middle flats, 
And also all our masters; 
To them, we lift our hats. 

We also have a Common room, 
To lounge in after bell, 
It used to be in Brent House, 
But we didn't like the smell. 

Our lights are always out on time, 
And everyone's in bed (?), 
Whereas in Brent, the boys on lights 
Are usually late instead. 

No doubt this verse will tell to all 
Who want to know the reason, 
For taking Brent for such a ride, 
"Aw kids, we're only teasin'." 

And now we'll tell you more about 
Our house, and those who dwell 
Within its walls — the bottom flat. 
(If this gets past Dobell). 

The M.O.D. on Friday nights 

He gives the "fiver" flicker, 

He tries to catch our George Robarts, 

But Creorge is always quicker. 

The M.O.D. is at the door 
A-talking there to "Fing". 
And all is quiet and peaceful 
Till in our George doth fling. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 33 

The light is doused, 'mid wild protest, 
And "it" proceeds next door, 
Where Mclntyre is hiding 
And there's powder on the floor. 

The M.O.D. is greeted by 
A billowing cloud of smoke, 
"Whatever are you doing here?" 
And Herbie answers "Joke!" 

And then the door is opened. 
And we "feel like being sick", 
For there, framed in the doorway, 
Stands our lanky "Stick". 

"Its eight for you and you and you," 
And Herb scoots out the door, 
And "Stick" puts on more powder, 
And spills it on the floor. 

"It" moves along the corridor 
With very cat-like tread, 
'Til Weinie nearly knocks him down 
While on his way to bed. 

The room is dark, and cold as well. 
You've often been in there. 
And as "it" switches on the light, 
"My goodness, where is Hare?" 

Our Doug is such a good lad 
Being slow he reallv hates. 
But our hero can not see that. 
And he gives the boy two lates. 

On entering 107, he finds 

The room is one big mess. 

For "Scoop" and Freddie Greenwood 

Have been eating, more or less. 

There's paper all around the floor 
And underneath the mats, 
For "Scoop", a staunch Republican 
Has no use for Democrats. 

He pounds out on his typewriter, 
His theories, wrong and right, 



34 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Till Freddie gets a lateness 
And our master turns the light. 

The next room is peculiar, 
For Bunnie's cider jug 
Is lying underneath the bed, 
Creating quite a fug. 

The room, we'll venture here to say, 
Hermetically is sealed, 
To rain and wind and hail and storm 
Its windows never yield. 

Our Bunny is a business man 
It's rather obvious there. 
For on his desk to certify 
Is one big mining share. 

The next room's full of gaiety, 
For there we find the "Gibbon" 
And dozens of Bermudians, 
It's Cox they're always ribbin'. 

For Harry cannot say a word, 

For why? His voice has fled; 

He croaked and coughed until Miss Fick 

Did order him to bed. 

"What a madhouse!" is the verdict. 
And now I'll try to tell 
What happened while inside the room 
Of Dawson and Dobell. 

This room is full of atmosphere, 
(Distinctive I should say). 
And Jack is reading there in bed 
While "Wong" is still away. 

("Wong" goes each night across to Brent, 
To eat and fill his face; 
He says it helps him really 
When he says the morning grace) . 

In Dawson's room the light is flicked 
The time, it now doth gain. 
It's nearly ten. and now is heard 
Sweet music's heavenlv strain. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 35 



It's Chester playing symphonies, 
With Matthews trying- to work. 
Poor Chester, he's a mental case. 
(Outside the law doth lurk). 

He springs into the shadowed room 
'Mid cries of "Watch the door!" 
Too late, all Chester's records 
Are lying on the floor. 

The light is out and now he goes 

To 102, where Burr 

Is lying innocent in bed; 

He hopes he'll never stir. 

Our Ed's the Head Prefect, 
Entitled to stay late. 
He's never there on Friday night, 
"It" never has to wait. 

Now "its" tour is nearly o'er 
With but two more to go. 
A loud cry comes from room 100, 
"Look out; you're on my toe!" 

It's "Hard" and Ken, a fighting there, 
Their room is upside down. 
They each receive four quarters 
From our master with a frown. 

Aha, the last is nearing now, 
I hear a strange new noise. 
Its "Joker" and Pat Vernon, who 
Are Bethune's promising boys. 

"Watch out, Sir, look above your head," 
And "it" jumps back dismayed. 
There lies a pail of Adam's Ale, 
On him 'twas to have laid. 

These are a few of Bethune's boys 
And if you don't like that, 
Just go up to Bermuda; 
It's on the topmost flat. 



36 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Our great and glorious Bethune House 
Of thee we'll sing thy praise, 
We'll talk about thy merits 
In distant future days. 

And I could go on telling you, 
My story to infinity, 
If Bethune House were just too full 
I then would turn to Trinity. 

— T.McC.W. 



BRENT 

Heavenly Days 



A cough broke the silence of that dimly lit room, and 
the footsteps still echoed heavily from the creaking stair- 
case. A dark, shadowy figure made its way step by step 
to the top of the landing, and disappeared into the dark- 
ness 

Death is swift! How quickly he had faded from life, 
he did not know. Those steps, yes, that was it, those 
steps. He must have fallen forward because as he tried 
now to get up he was lying face downwards. A strange 
feeling swept his prostrate body; he seemed to be floating 
through space. And while he struggled to his feet, he was 
aware of a new force — an attraction upwards; someone 
seemed to be pullmg him skyward. And just when he 
began to walk towards this goal he stopped. He had no 
control over himself. Confused and bewildered he tried to 
think. He seemed to be slipping backwards now, pulled by 
some new power. What could he do? 

At this moment of despair, he saw a face before him. 
It was a handsome face, long, firm, with long hair slightly 
gray from worry, and as he began to speak his left eyebrow 
was lifted high, as though he were doing just another job 
customary to his daily routine. "Well, Bud" he said, "Your 
time has come at last. Can't be helped I suppose; in any 
case you've come to us just at the right time. But first, 
before you enter into our way of life, you must make a 
choice. You have two alternatives. Bud. The first is sky- 
ward, which is that pulling you felt just before I came in 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 37 

to help you. You can take this course Bud; it is a good 
one, a course full of victories and conquest, a land of con- 
tentment and friendliness. You can go this way if you 
like, or you may go below — to a land inhabited by savages, 
intent only on getting ahead no matter what the cost. Take 
your choice Bud, but hurry! I hear the sound of our 
elevator. Up or down. Bud; hurry!" 

There was a sharp crack of a whip, and a red light 
flashed out of nowhere with a thick white arrow pointing 
downward. A doorway opened in the wall and a rather 
tall, dark-haired man stepped forward. "Going down", he 
exclaimed; and as he spoke, he played with a bristly 
mustache on his upper lip. "If you're coming, you'd better 
hurry up" he continued in an unusually sarcastic tone. "If 
you come with me I will show you a world where you can 
at least make a worth-while person of yourself. Either 
get in or stay out, I really don't care which you do, but 
make up your mind, I haven't all day." 

Not knowing quite what to do. Bud stood still, thought- 
ful and perplexed. As he began to wonder just what death 
had bestowed upon him, tnere was a smooth swish in the 
air, and another elevator eased gently into position. A 
medium sized man dressed in brown stepped out of the car. 
He appeared to be stroking a rather determined looking 
chin. "Well", he said, "right on time; not one thousandth 
of a minute out. Oh! there you are. John, isn't it, or just 
what is your name ? Anyway it makes no difference ; hurry 
up, we've no time to lose. We have exactly seventeen 
minutes until we call for our next client. Oh! come on, 
there is no time to figure this out, just face the facts and 
come with me to our home in the heavens." 

Taken in by the speed and precision of this strange 
operator. Bud no longer hesitated, but stepped into the 
waiting car. As he did so, he waved goodbye to the others 
present and as the doors slid smoothly to a close, he 
heard the driver of the downward elevator cry in disgust: 
"Oh well, have it your own way. But don't say I didn't 
warn you". 



38 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

"Buzz, buzz, buzz, went the buzzer; clang, clang, clang 
went the bell" shouted the operator as the car glided to a 
stop. "All out for Brent, the home in the heavens." 

One by one they left the elevator. There were thir- 
teen shaky newcomers. As they approached the main hall, 
they were all full of expectation and nervousness. Never 
before had they seen such a place. The walls were lined 
with pictures of famous Brent teams which had defended 
the "heavens in their own backyard." But the first things 
they noticed were, I believe, the names on the many doors 
which led off the hall. They were the ones which apparent- 
ly had been there the longest. The first one they saw was 
Howard. I guess they wondered how he had found his way 
into this wonderful existence. They discovered later that 
he ran his legs off and passed away. Then there was 
Bovaird: they say he got himself so tied up in one of his 
stories that he strangled himself. Further down the hall 
they ran into Decker, who by some strange feat died of an 
overdose of Absorbine Junior — poor lad! Sinclair, another 
gem of Brent, they were told, beat himself to death on a 
drum. Davidson, it is rumoured, passed peacefully away 
due to some trouble with ingrowing toenails. Irwin appar- 
ently died of shock when his wrist watch stopped — he vow- 
ed it would never happen again — it hasn't. ,And last of all, 
at the end of the spacious corridor, they met Allen — he. 
poor soul, suffered an attack of sleeping sickness, and hasn't 
been the same since. 

As Bud stood there among all this splendour and glory, 
he casually glanced out of a nearby window. There to his 
complete amazement were three Brent House new boys 
proudly whirling around a high bar, doing upstarts. Al- 
ready he was proud of them — they were a part of his new 
"home in the heavens". Yes, he would like it here — every- 
one does. Thinkmg back over his decision, he was happy. 
He would continue the A one standard of former Brent 
House days. 

E.McC.S. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 39 



ContributioEns 




EDITORIAL 

The Record — What is it ? What does it mean to you ? 
Does it mean a number of uninteresting printed pages 
which come out twice each term and is labelled the School 
magazine? Is it just somewhere you may find your own 
name, in print, if you have made a touchdown or won a 
Victory Bond? Or does it mean something more? Is it, 
then, a living periodical which holds a real and constant 
interest, which you look forward to reading, which you 
cherish and will continue to prize when you leave T.C.S.? 

Many of our Old Boys have found that it has meant 
just that in the past. It has entered their homes carrying 
welcome news of the old School and strengthening the un- 
breakable bond between them and their successors. In re- 
cent years it has found its way to the front lines of every 
battlefield where it has helped pass many hours of tense 
waiting. 

The Record, as its name implies, is a record of events 
that take place at T.C.S. That is its purpose. That is why 
it is eternally cherished. That is why its appeal is so great 
to our Old Boys who have left the marbled corridors and 
the panelled dining hall behind. 

Now, a record of experiences cannot be compiled and 
written by one person. Even a group of boys finds it dif- 
ficult, especially in a School like our own where life is quick- 
moving and has many aspects. It is all the more difficult 
if the co-operation and support of the School is not behind 
the Record and its staff. 



40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

To allow the Record to fulfil its purpose we must re- 
present each section, each form, each interest; nay, every 
boy must have a share in its making. Therefore when we 
are enjoying this happy Christmas season with our families 
and friends, let us refresh ourselves with new ideas, ex- 
periences and stories, so that, one and all, we may contri- 
bute them to the Record in some form of prose or verse 
or art. So let us to the task and privilege of making the 
Record live with a personality acquired from the School 
it truly represents. 

— G.P.H.V. 



THE TEAK-WOOD SHELF— A Seqnel 

Whene'er I look into a book, 
Which from the teak-wood shelf I took, 
I dream of wondrous things. 

Of Bonaparte, Pasteur, Moliere; 
Of Frederick's friend, the great Voltaire, 
Who wrote for many kings. 

In England, too, were many men: 
Keats, Byron, Shelley; others then. 
To whom we owe our praise. 

There's Shakespeare, Milton; many more 
Including almost twenty score, 
Who lived in glorious days. 

And yet another book I take. 
And notice names of men like Drake, 
Or Nelson; sailors all. 

Of Cartier, Cook, Cabot, and Scott 
Who cross the stormy oceans fought 
To answer heaven's call. 

Of Wellington, the brave Iron Duke; 
At Waterloo he gave rebuke 
To Bonaparte, sedate. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 41 



From out the pages walk the great: 
Nor do their numbers yet abate. 
Forever live the great. 

— J.R.L. 



FIFTH AVE., N.Y. 



Along Fifth Avenue, New York's fashion centre, can 
be seen what probably are the world's smartest women 
and what, quite decidedly, are the world's worst dressed 
men. Shops with extravagant show windows and plush in- 
teriors line the Avenue and massive office buildings tower 
above them. Brightly coloured taxis dart between the 
more ponderous lorries and buses with squealing brakes 
and clashing gears; pedestrians with apparent nonchalance 
slip in and out of the flowing traffic. Along the sidewalks 
and below the sea of men's panamas and women's, well . . . 
hats, can be seen the harried faces of businessmen rush- 
ing from one place to another, the lively faces of newsboys, 
the bewildered faces of tourists; but predominant are the 
time-worn and lined faces of people who have never known 
real happinness, whose whole lives are devoted to the art 
of making money. They live in a world of artificial and 
superficial pleasures, they are pampered by the "toys" of 
modem invention; it makes one wonder if our civilization 
is all it is made out to be. 

One can take a ride down the Avenue in a twin-decker 
bus, the trip starting at Washington Square. There near- 
ly two hundred years ago, Washington camped with his 
troops. Looking South he might have seen the small but 
growing town of New York, but East and West and North 
he could have seen only a few scattered farm-houses and 
the picturesque New England countryside, where the great 
steel and concrete monuments to man's ingenuity now 
stand. As the bus moves forward and passes under the 
Washington Arch, the whole of Fifth Avenue stretches out 
before one, clouded by the smoke of many factories. Far 
off the Empire State Building rears its awe-inspiring tower. 
At Fourteenth Street, the bus stops to take on a load of 



42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

perspiring shoppers who invariably crowd that street and 
flow over into Fifth Avenue. As the bus approaches the 
fashion centre, the shop windows become less crowded, but 
each display article is made to stand out with coloured 
lights and mirrors and glossy draperies. Then the bus 
halts at Forty-Second Street to disgorge its load. The Pub- 
lic Library is on the left, with its guardian lions and beau- 
tiful Corinthian columns; and to the right, the Grand Cen- 
tral Terminal can be glimpsed. 

It is a fascinating sight to v^^atch the milling crowds 
on either side of the bus. The profusion of colour, with 
bright reds and greens, sparkling whites and shining 
blacks all mingle to form a seething, multi-hued river of 
life and action. The man along Fifth Avenue dresses with 
no regard for taste ; colour is his only thought. He usually 
wears a panama hat with a bright coloured band ; his gaudy 
tie, is wrapped around the collar of an equally gaudy shirt; 
his coat cannot be described, beyond that it is of many 
materials and of peculiar design. 

When the bus passes Rockefeller Centre on one side 
and St. Patrick's Cathedral on the other, one becomes 
aware that this is the fashion centre, for here the crowd 
is not so flashily dressed. Instead, the clothes are more 
select and show better taste, since the dresses one sees 
along the side-walks are copied all over the world. Leaving 
this expensive district, Central Park appears on the left, 
like a rectangle of New England countryside in the middle 
of the city; on the right there lies a thin fringe of stylish 
apartment houses hiding the filthy slums of Harlem, Be- 
yond this, the Avenue wanders aimlessly through the 
squalor and dirt of slums that can only be found in such 
huge cities, until finally it comes to a halt by the Harlem 
River. 

For all its individuality, colour and extravagance, 
Fifth Avenue, or New York for that matter, has no soul 
or spirit. Its people are not welded together by a solid 
bond of tradition. Most New Yorkers have been there only 
one generation and come from all comers of the earth, 
mixing with one another but not blending. Even with a 
great tradition and heritage. New York would have no 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 43 

soul. Living there is too impersonal. Everything from 
business to art and culture is commercialized. Life is too 
artificial and mechanical. Each man lives his own life for 
his own good. That is the price a cosmopolitan centre has 
to pay for being cosmopolitan. 

— F.J.M. 




Off THg 
RECORD 



WRITER'S CRAMP 

When they told me to write something funny, 
I told them I didn't know how; 
Their reply was: "We want it tomorrow, — 
So you'd better start writing it now!" 

I skimmed through the latest New Yorker, 
I dug up back numbers of Punch; 
It was Friday, you know what that means, 
So I ate lots of Brain Food for limch. 

But somehow I couldn't get started — 
My mind was as blank as the page; 
I pondered through supper and study. 
Then, to bed, I retired in a rage. 

They woke me up early next morning, 
Their looks made me feel slightly blue; 
But after a lengthy discussion, 
They told me that this thing would do! 

—J.G.Q, 



44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

UNFORSEEN RAPTURE 

Someone has described laughter as a faculty bestowed 
exclusively upon the human race. This statement rever- 
berated mockingly in Pongo's tormented cranium, forming 
and reforming itself upon his lips as he stood trembling 
with fury in the midst of a seething, jeering mob of howl- 
ing schoolmates, wishing the more fervently with every 
passing second that it had been bestowed exclusively upon 
the animal kingdom instead; in fact, looking about him 
through eyes bleared with rage and frustration, he wasn't 
at all sure that it hadn't. 

The situation which originally gave rise to such 
mirth was, of course, positively fraught with humour — 
to all, of course, but Pongo. It had materialized earlier 
that Pongo's seat of affections had been considerably 
stirred, aroused and otherwise smitten or sat upon by a 
fair lady, Rosemary y-clept, whose excuse for existence 
was discovered upon further examination to be in the 
doubtful status of neice by marriage and nurse by appoint- 
ment to the "Ginder", Mr. Pottlebottom, the maths, master 
at Worthington, of whom it was common knowledge, that 
unless he was conducting a maths, class with Euclid as 
score and a slide rule as baton, he was most utterly at a loss. 
Now it so happened that Mr. Pottlebottom, confirmedly in 
his dotage and supposedly entering senility, compelled him- 
self to indulge in, and imbibe huge quantities of, certain 
patent medicines in order to stave off the encroachments of 
numerous malignant, incurable, and entirely loathsome dis- 
eases, which he, a hypochondriac of the first and foremost 
water, suspected himself of harbouring. However, a situa- 
tion appalling in its propensities and possibilities was being 
concocted, the perpetration of which was assigned to the 
bewildered, and unconsulted, but none the less passionate 
Pongo; for his companions had arrived at the conclusion 
that it was high time that he should manifest his devotion 
to Rosemary in some manner more palpable than longing 
looks and sighs of blast furnace dimensions, and it would 
seem, they had decided that the form which this mani- 
festation should assume would be that of a kiss. To a well- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 45 

bred chap like Pongo, this, of course, went entirely against 
the grain; nevertheless, when he had been forcibly per- 
suaded into a state of involuntary unanimity, it was agreed 
that upon Rosemary's next expedition to the village of 
Worthington, Pongo should hasten to take concealment in 
a thick hedge about half a mile from the school, from 
whence he should precipitate himself upon her on her re- 
turn and realize the ultimate satiation of his ardour. 

In direct temporary parallel to this revelation, the 
"Ginder" began to experience ominous rumblings in his mid- 
section, which to him heralded unmistakably the approach 
and immenent onslaught of one of his unmentionable afflic- 
tions, and hastening, terror-stricken to his medicine closet, 
discovered to his horror that the supply of the particular 
pink balm, which he employed exclusively for the appease- 
ment of such volanically inclined maladies was entirely ex- 
hausted. Seized by panic, frightful to behold, he conducted 
a one man stampede through the house, thundering from 
room to room, and summoning Rosemary with a series of 
blood-curdling yells. When she arrived breathless from 
the garden, she found him raging in the midst of the de- 
struction, clasping his midriff with one hand, and prostrat- 
ing furniture furiously left and right, with a huge meat 
cleaver in the other. When he caught sight of her he 
emitted a hideous elephantine roar, and trumpeting shrilly, 
despatched her at a full gallop to Worthington for quarts 
of pink balm. 

Rosemary's disordered retreat to Worthington was 
noticed, not without interest, by several of the elect, who 
immediately sought Pongo, and having administered a 
verbal lashing, consisting mainly of threats of physical 
violence, they drove him as a lamb to the slaughter to- 
wards the predetermined place of ambush. After a short 
wail, during which time Pongo's drooping spirits were 
bolstered by methods not imknown in the Spanish Inquisi- 
tion, footsteps were heard approaching swiftly from the 
direction of the village. The footsteps, obviously feminine 
by their rapidity, were almost directly in front of him. It 
was now or never! Pongo would have been quite satisfied 
with "never" but fearful of the gruesome consequences 



46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

attendant upon his failure to accomplish the crime, he 
gasped, hesitated for a split second, then with a Titanic 
burst of unreasoned fury, he burst through the hedge in a 
breath-taking flying tackle, which effectively brought his 
quarry down. Then, as if sensing his mastery of the situa- 
tion, he leaned forward, blinded with bliss, and with closed 
eyes, planted a warm and impassioned kiss on the lips of 
the headmaster's wife! 

— H,C.B. 



ONE TWO THREE KICK 

conscience. 

Why dost thou always upon me take thine ensconscience ? 

Why dost thou continue to irk me 

As back from the Tuck thou dost jerk me? 

Why art thou the complete and utter wrecquer 

Of my plans to dissipate my exchequer? 

Alas, thou makest me like a quarter-back who cannot de- 
cide whether to pass or plunge 

And thou squeezest worldly desires out of me 

Like water out of a sponge. 

Thou raisest me to furious wrath 

When thou permittest me but five minutes in the bath. 

Thou drivest me to the frenzy of a Holy Rola 

When thou deniest me a bottle, yea, even one sip of Pepsi 
or Coca-Cola; 

And thou submittest me to the tortures of Hell 

When thou compellest me to rise at the rising bell. 

1 don't see why its really necessary just then to raise my- 

self or 
What do you suppose they would ring the ten, five or two 
minute bells for? 

And I'm not denying that thou art a thing of beauty. 
But why hast not thou the visage of a sweetie or cutie? 
In fact, towards thyself I find myself extraordinarily lack- 
ing in gratitude. 

Not because I don't realize that thou art a good influence, 
but simply because I don't like thine attitude. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 47 

And when I feel thy pricks, I do not feel like wildly ap- 

plauseating ; 
Not because I don't respect thee, but because I find thy 

presence distinctly nauseating. 
Finally, going religious and considering things all in all, 
Why dids't thou not confine thine activities strictly to 

greater men like St. Peter and St. Paul? 

— H.C.B. 



"SILENCE IS GOLDEN" IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE 

Deathly silence, like a gloom. 
Falls upon the noisy room. 
Fearful footsteps, soft yet clear, 
Had reached one noisy culprit's ear; 
He shouted loud, above the din, 
"Look out fellahs, here's the . . . . " 

— J.H.C. 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

The Editor 

T.C.S. "Record", 
Port Hope, Ont. 
Dear Sir, 

I am stirred by righteous indignation, and my wrath 
waxes hot within me. Therefore I take up the cudgels on 
behalf of the reputation of an Old Boy of T.C.S. , grievously 
wronged in the columns of your publication. 

Sir, I submit that in your account of the Old Boys' 
football match (Vol. 48, No. 1, Oct., 1944, p's 54, 55) you 
have been guilty of a flagrant breach of your time honour- 
ed record for honesty and fair play. 

In the last four lines of that account you mention that 
'a costly fumble' was made by the Headmaster, a member 
of the Old Boys' team. This statement definitely accuses 
the said player of dropping the ball when he should have 
held it, and it implies by the word "costly" that a player 
of the opposing team recovered it and that a score was 
made because of that fumble. 



48 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

No player or spectator has been found who recalls any 
such fumble; indeed it is manifestly ridiculous to suggest 
that any T.C.S. Old Boy, schooled in the fundamentals of 
football, would ever commit such an elementary error. In 
the game under discussion, all the members of the Old 
Boys' team were brilliant players, they consistently made 
gains down the field through plays cleverly conceived 
and expertly executed, and though they may have been 
tempted to hand the ball to the opposing team in order to 
give them a chance, they did not permit such a charitable 
sentiment to overcome their hard business sense of making 
profits at the expense of their weaker brethren. 

Sir, this statement is an outrage; it casts aspersions 
upon a member of a notable Old Boys' team, and it has 
no basis in fact. The game cannot be replayed to prove 
the point; the dastardly accusation lies in cold print for 
all the world to read, generation after generation. Who 
knows that these words will not become a "cause celebre" 
between the grandchildren of the victim and those of the 
guilty writer, perhaps resulting in a deadly rocket duel by 
stratosphere. 

The vile accusation may easily find expression on the 
victim's tombstone in words such as these: 

Here lies the body of PACK 
He died maintaining the right of way; 
In Old Boys' game he took a tumble 
The "Record" called it "costly fumble". 

Such slander cut him to the quick, 
He said he thought it was a trick 
To steal away his thunder — 
At least a blatant blunder. 

Again he read the sad account. 
Ran to the barn, his bike did mount. 
And roared into the blue; 
Exhaust and dust behind him flew. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL REX^ORD 49 

On, on, he rushed in fury cold, 

The noise drowned words he used to scold 

The perpetrator of the crime; 

Resolved, he turned upon a dime 

At forty miles an hour; 
With broadside skid he lost the power 
To keep his seat, off did he tumble— 
The "Record" called it "costly fumble". 

* * * * 

All ye who envy football fame 
Take note: not only play the game 
But make quite sure the "Record" scribe 
Does not indulge in diatribe. 

Yours most critically (in this particular), 
An Old Boy 




50 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 





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IMPRESSIONS OF THE CAPTAIN 

The 1944 football season at T.C.S. could be described, 
I believe, as an excellent example of high school foot- 
ball in all its elements. This does not necessarily mean 
that we had an all-time championship team, but the spirit, 
drive, ability, and team play shown in the squad vv^ere ex- 
tremely good. Only once during all the games did the team 
let down. That was in the first half of the U.C.C. game; 
but in their brilliant offensive in the second half, I feel that 
they more than made up for that one lapse. 

Although two games were lost and one tied, it cannot 
reflect on the players who continually gave their utmost in 
fight and ability, and sustained their drive until the last 
whistle of every game. Middleside started a "sixty minute" 
slogan two years ago. which was taken up again by this 
year's Bigside. The School had to come from behind in 
every game, except when they blanked Peterborough, and 
in every case they scored the last point. This, I believe, 
is quite a record for a team which was continually out- 
weighed, especially in the line. The dying moments of the 
Ridley and U.C.C. games were top notch in anv man's 
football. 

At times, as always happens, the practices were 
"slightly strained". However, you cannot help laughing 
when you see the "Stick" - "dangling" down the field, or 
"Weinie" madly grabbing at thin air after missing a down- 
field tackle. 



4 
TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 

Then there was the coach — he undoubtedly sweated 
and smoked more "foot pounds of work" than the whole 
team put together, although, to be honest, he cut himself 
down to two packages a game! Most of our success in the 
season was due directly to the Coach, and our hopes and 
wishes go out to him to produce the Little Big Four champs 
of '45. — E.J.M.Il. 



IMPRESSIONS OF THE COACH 

My reactions to writing these thumb-nail sketches of 
Bigside players are comparable to those of a small boy 
called upon to write an essay on "The Glories of a Sunset" 
or "The Woods in Spring". I think you understand my 
meaning. And like the small boy, I have to get it done 
now, to-night, because the Sports Editor is waving a very 
large stick over my head. So reluctantly to the task of 
writing something nice about each of the twenty players 
who received First or Half First Team Colours. I used to 
make lists of suitable adjectives for every composition v/e 
were called upon to produce. We had a teacher who re- 
velled in adjectives and I dutifully worked mine in. For 
instance, glorious, flamboyant, painted, fit a simset — so we 
would have that the fading sun flung its flamboyant fingers 
across the glorious sky. The teacher loved this stuff (she 
later sought emotional escape by marrying the local plum- 
ber). Personally I thought it was awful. 

I have a list of forty-seven adjectives which seem to 
be useful in describing rugby players. The list is divided 
into two columns, one for linemen and the other for half- 
backs. The first column includes such words as hard, 
tough, charging, quick, spirited, alert; and the second 
column contains crashing, fleet, dependable, etc. All I have 
to do now is match adjectives and players and I shall be 
able to look Editor Sinclair in the face tomorrow morning. 

HUYCKE — Captain — Third year — Passing , kicking, buck- 
ing, running, tackling backfielder (five adjective man). 
Probably the best all-round player in the Little Big Four 
this year. 



52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

McINTYRE— Co-Vice-Captain — Second Year — Rugged, 
tough, hard blocker and deadly tackier (four adjective 
man). 

SINCLAIR — Co-Vice-Captain — Second Year — Tricky run- 
ner, good passer, dependable quarterback, sure catch 
(everyone drops one now or then), (four adjective man). 

WADE — First year — Alert centre secondary; very reliable 
tackier and excellent blocker; good spirit man (four ad- 
jective man). Please note: all three, four and five adjec- 
tive men received First Team Colours. Reader please 
count adjectives for himself hereafter. 

RICHARDSON — First year — Husky, fast, fleet runner and 
one of the best in the group this year. 

LAMBERT — First year — Hard tackier, good blocker and 
pass catcher; he helped greatly to make the end runs go. 

DEXDKER — First year — Crashing plunger, hard open field 
runner, improved greatly over last year. 

McMURRICH — First year — A very shifty runner, sure 
catch, above average passer and excellent secondary de- 
fense. 

WILSON — First year — Good blocker, fair pass receiver (al- 
most full marks for U.C.C. game) and good tackier. A 
little too easily out-shifted by opposing halves. 

Thus we have the backfield of this year's Bigside plus 
the left end and centre secondary covered with twenty ad- 
jectives and only three repetitions. As for the rest of the 
line — outweighed in every game, once by as much as twenty 
pounds per man — they need not take a back seat to any 
line opposing them this year. Going from the left to the 
right end of the line we have: — 

GREENWOOD— First year — Our "big" left middle — 
weighing all of one hundred and sixty pounds. Fair 
blocker and ace defensive lineman, who made sure that 
the left side of our line was seldom open. 



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TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 

WARNER — Second year — Fiery as the hair on his head; 
just the type to love the rugged play in the centre of the 
line. A very good inside, 

GILL AN — First year — His hair, such as the barber left on, 
was not red (although his nose often was) but his play 
at the other inside position was just as fiery as Warner's. 
Both played sixty minutes all season. 

VERNON — First year — Probably the most improved player 
on the team. He played the blocking middle's position 
and held up his end defensively. 

DOBELL — Second year — (This forces me to cross-rough 
my adjectives because he was backfielder and end). Very 
fast, but not shifty as a backfielder; became a good 
blocker and above average downfield tackier. End seems 
to be his position. 

FRENCH — First year — One hundred and forty pounds, so 
well co-ordinated that he was able to bring down or block 
out opponents much heavier than himself. Rated as the 
best natural pass receiver on the team. 

"A chain is only as strong as its v/eakest links" and all 
that sort of thing. We had five other links to our chain — 
Toole, Allen, Stokes, Phippen, Gilbert — but they were not 
weak. Each helped to give the team uniform strength. 
Toole substituted for Mclntyre and that was a job in itself. 
At left end, he blocked fairly well, was good on downfield 
tackling and seemed to be a sure pass-receiver. Allen and 
Gilbert relieved Greenwood and Vernon. Allen was better 
on offensive, not so strong defensively; the reverse seemed 
to be the case for Gilbert. Phippen deserves great praise 
for the way he filled the breach when Wade got his head in 
the way of an Upper Canada plunger. Stokes did not get 
much chance to play, but because we knew he could be re- 
lied upon to take either Warner's or Gillan's place he was 
awarded Half First Team Colours without any reservations. 

Thus we have the Bigside squad of this year. We did 
not win a championship but we certainly were not "skunk- 
ed". (Apologies from the History Department to the Eng- 



54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

lish Department) . I believe the team played up to the best 
of its abilities and no one should ask for more. As they 
say in the Indian country where I come from "How, How!". 

— A.B.H. 



SCHOOL vs. RIDLEY 

At Toronto, October 28 

In a thrill-packed, fast-moving game, the School went 
down fighting in their annual clash with Ridley, 27-15. 
Despite the score, the School held their own against their 
heavier opponents, and threatened until the final whistle. 
For over half the game, T.C.S. seemed to be the better 
team. 

The School got the drop on the opening kick-off, when 
illegal interference gave them the ball on the Ridley forty 
yard line. The Ridley line stiffened, however, and the 
School was forced to kick. Wade's recovery of a Ridley 
fumble on the fifteen yard line gave the School another 
chance, but again the Ridley line held. A field goal failed, 
and Ridley gained possession. McFarlane battered his way 
through the centre for two first downs but was finally held 
and a good kick set the School back on their own twenty- 
five yard line. McFarlane set up the first Ridley point by 
running back a T.C.S. kick to the thirty yard line and from 
there Davis kicked a single. Dobell gave T.C.S. their third 
break when he recovered a fumbled kick in enemy territory. 
Decker brought it to the ten yard line on an end run and 
Huycke bucked it over, to put Trinity in the lead. The con- 
vert failed. Ridley picked up another point before the 
quarter ended when Davis kicked a single. 

Ridley drove deep on two completed forward passes by 
McFarlane, but Richardson stopped their drive by virtue 
of an interception. The power of Ridley could not be 
downed, however, and by continued bucking they carried it 
to the one yard line where, after three tries, McFarlane 
took it over on an end run. Barbour converted. 

Without once losing the ball, the School plunged from 
their own thirty-five yard line up the field to score. Decker 
and Huycke did the ball carrying and Decker finally bucked 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 

over from the five, for an unconverted major. But three 
short kicks by T.C.S. gave Ridley the ball on the twenty- 
five j^ard line. Quick to take advantage of the bieak, B.R.C. 
tried a long pass; it was not caught but the referee ruled 
interference which gave Ridley the ball on the five. Davis 
then ploughed through the line to put Ridley back in the 
lead. Barbour converted and the half-time score was 14-10. 

Ridley kept T.C.S. in her own end from the start of 
the second half, but good running by the Trinity backs kept 
them from scoring until near the end of the period when 
Davis kicked his third single. Ridley again forged ahead 
when they recovered a fumble deep in the T.C.S. end zone. 
A completed pass, and then a buck by Parker gave them 
another major which was converted by Barbour, making 
the score 21-10 at three-quarter time. 

In the last quarter both teams opened up and the game 
became faster. Ridley got their final touchdown early in 
the period when McLaughlin bucked over from the five 
yard line after Ridley recovered a fumbled kick. Ridley 
got one more point on a single, but then T.C.S. came to 
life. Richardson gained fifty yards on two flicker plays 
which carried the School to the Ridley twenty-five. The 
School got a first down on bucks and then Huycke scored 
his second touchdo\vn. T.C.S. received the kick-off and 
again marched up the field. Richardson ran forty yards 
around the end on another flicker play to put the ball 
in Ridley territory. A beautiful buck by Huycke carried 
the team to the five yard line, but the advance was cut 
short when the ball was fumbled; shortly after the final 
whistle blew. 

The School certainly has nothing to be ashamed of by 
their showing. They played heads-up football all the way 
and were beaten by a much heavier squad. Huycke played 
the best game for the School, and Sinclair, Wade and 
Warner were also outstanding. It was not, however, in- 
dividual players who starred, but the team as a whole. 
Ridley's best were McFarlane, Davis and McLaughlin, 
whose play on both the offensive and defensive left nothing 
to be desired. 



56 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Ridley — Snap, Jasperson; insides, Purdom, MacLachlan; middles, 
Hodgins, Crosby; ends, Barbour, Perry; quarter, McFarlane; flying 
wing, Fisher; halves, Bartlett, Davis, Shields. Subs: Mann, Daniel, 
Scruton, Travers, McGiverin, Hutcheson. 

T.C.S. — Snap, Wade; insides, Warner, Gillan; middles. Green- 
wood, Vernon; ends, Mclntyre i, Dobell i; quarter, Sinclair; flying 
wing, Lambert; halves, Huycke, Decker, Richardson. Subs: Phip- 
pen, Stokes, Allen, Gilbert, Toole, French i, Roenisch, Wilson 1, 
McMurrich. 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Toronto, November 4 

A thrilling eighty-five yard touchdown march in the 
closing minutes was the feature of the game which savv"^ the 
School win a 12-7 victory over Upper Canada College in 
their final Little Big Four encounter. Although unable to 
make their plays click in the first half, T.C.S. came to life 
in the last quarter and passed the College off their feet, 
twice marching up the field — once for a single, and a second 
time for a major score. 

U.C.C. 's only touchdown came early in the game when 
Gossage fell on a blocked Trinity kick on the T.C.S. twenty- 
five yard line. A pass gave them a first down on the ten. 
and then Cole scampered around the end for the score. Mc- 
Laughlin kicked the convert and U.C.C. lead 6-0. The 
School slowly gained ground by virtue of Huycke's superior 
kicking and the running of Sinclair and Richardson. Fre- 
quently kicking on second down, T.C.S. worked their way 
up the field. A short kick by the College to their own thirty 
yard line gave T.C.S. the break they worked for. On a 
well-executed end run, McMurrich ran to the two yard line 
and Huycke plunged over for a score. The convert failed 
and T.C.S. was still trailing. U.C.C. again threatened when 
McDougall recovered a fumbled kick in the Trinity end 
zone. A pass from Spence to Leuty gave them a first on 
the twenty yard line. Twice Richardson ran the ball out 
of touch to save a score, but McLaughlin finally kicked a 
rouge to put U.C.C. on top of a 7-5 score at half time. 

The School was again hemmed in their own end in the 
first part of the third quarter, but a beautiful twenty yard 
run by Richardson brought the ball out of danger. Gillan's 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 57 

recovered fumble in U.C.C. territory and an end run put 
the ball in scoring position. The U.C.C. line held, however, 
and they stopped three plays for a loss. After several ex- 
changes of kicks. Trinity began to roll. Starting from 
their own ten yard line, they marched uninterrupted up the 
field on three passes — two from Huycke to Sinclair, and one 
from Huycke to Wilson. At the U.C.C. ten yard line, they 
were stopped and Huycke kicked a single to make the score 
7-6. Trinity then started another drive from their own 
thirty-five yard line, featuring two long passes from Huycke 
to Mclntyre and Sinclair. A fumble on the U.C.C. twenty- 
five yard line momentarily stopped the School, and good 
kicking pushed T.C.S. back to their own fifteen. With time 
failing rapidly, the School began their winning march. Mc- 
lntyre received another twenty yard pass, two flickers 
worked for a first down and a long Huycke-to- Wilson pass 
clicked for thirty yards. Another flicker play carried Tri- 
nity to the three yard line and after one buck failed, a 
pass from Huycke to Sinclair was good for the winning 
touchdown. Sinclair converted, making the score 12-7. 
In a desperate attempt to score, U.C.C. completed one pass 
but an interception by Sinclair ended the threat. 

The comeback of the School in the last quarter was a 
wonderful sight to see. They were not the same team that 
started, and the drive they showed in the final quarter 
proved them to be superior. Huycke's passing and kicking, 
and the running of Sinclair and Richardson, stood out in 
the backfield, while Mclntyre shone on the line. Again, it 
was the whole team who won the game and not individuals. 
Cole, McLaughlin and McDougall starred for the College. 

U.C.C— Snap, Beatty, E.; insides, Beatty, C., Borham; middles, 
Gaviller, Prowse; ends, McDougall, Gossage; quarter, Spence; flying 
wing, Eager; halves, King, McLaughlin, Cole. Subs: Scott, Harvie, A. 
O'Brian, Mulqueen, Leuty, Denton. Harvie, p., McClelland, Goad. 

T.C.S. — Snap, Wade; insides, Warner, Gillan; middles, Green- 
wood. Vernon; ends, Mclntyre i, French i; quarter, Sinclair; flying 
wing, Lambert; halves, Huycke, Decker, Richardson. Subs: Phippen, 
Stokes, Allen, Gilbert, Dobell i, Toole, Roenisch, Wilson i, McMurrich. 



58 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

HOUSE GAME 
November 13 

in the annual Bigside House game, Bethune emerged 
victorious over a plucky but weaker Brent team 9-3. The 
game v\'as evenly contested and Brent kept Bethune on their 
toes all the time. 

Bethune kicked off and during the quarter Brent was 
held in their ovv^n end. Both teams were good defensively 
and neither could start any serious ^offence. The only scor- 
ing opportunity came late in the quarter when Toole re- 
covered a Brent fumble. A penalty set them back and ihe 
Bient line held to end the threat. 

A blocked kick by Warner in the opening minutes of 
the second quarter gave Bethune another chance, since 
they gained possession of the ball on the Brent fifteen. A 
buck and a pass failed and Sinclair ran a short kick out of 
touch to save a point. Brent kicked and, after a first down 
for Bethune on two flickers, Sinclair intercepted a Bethune 
pass and ran to his own forty yard line before being tackled. 
A Brent pass was intercepted by French, but Brent again 
took possession when Fisher intercepted a flicker pass. 
Brent was held and kicked short. A Bethune kick set them 
back to their own twenty yard line. Another short kick 
by Brent gave Bethune possession deep in enemy territory. 
A flicker play gained a first down but Brent stiffened and 
held them for no further gain. Bethune, however, broke 
the scoreless deadlock on a beautiful field-goal by Huycke 
to give them a o-O lead at hail-urnc. 

Brent opened fast in the second half and gained pos- 
session on their own forty yard-line on a Bethune fumble. 
A thirty yard end run by Decker put them in scoring 
territory, but Bethune held and they were forced to kick. 
However, the kick was fumbled and Brent recovered again, 
gaining the ball on the five yard line. They were held 
on a buck and a pass and Decker finally evened the score 
with a field goal. Bethune then began to roll; an end run 
and a twenty yard buck by McMurrich brought the ball into 
Brent territory. A lovely run-back out to the one yard 
line by Sinclair saved a point for Brent, but a short kick 
put Bethune in position again and this time liuvc^'e sue- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 59 

ceeded in kicking the single. Immediately afterwards 
Toole fell on a blocked Brent kick on the fifteen yard line 
and, after one buck had failed, McMurrich scored on an 
end run to give Bethune a 9-3 lead. The convert failed. 

In the last quarter Bethune was kept in its o^ati end, 
and a hard-charging line saved any possible scares. Im- 
mediately after the kick off, Sinclair intercepted a pass on 
the Bethune forty yard line and from there a long pass to 
Mclntyre gave them the ball on the three yard line. The 
Bethune forward wall rose to the occasion and stopped 
two bucks for no gain and knocked down a flicker to end 
the Brent threat. Brent kept pressing for the rest of the 
period but Huycke's lovely kicking kept them out until the 
closing minutes of the game, when a twenty yard Roenisch- 
to-Sinclair pass was completed on the Bethune twenty yard 
line. Brent got a first down on a buck and an end run 
but the game ended with no further score. 

Like all House games, this one was well played and 
hard fought and the outcome was not certain until the final 
whistle. Hubie Sinclair's running and Ed. Huycke's kick- 
ing were the outstanding features of the game. Mclntyre 
and Decker also stood out for Brent, while French i, Warner 
and McMurrich starred for Bethune. 

Brent — Snap, Fisher; insides, Gillan, Stokes; middles, Irwin, 
Allen; ends, Mclntyre i, Howard; quarter, Sinclair; flying wing, Wil- 
son 1; halves, Lawson, Decker, Roenisch. Subs: Stratford, Bird, Mc- 
lntyre ii, O'Grady. 

Bethune — Snap, Wade; insides, Warner, Phippen; middles. Green- 
wood, Vernon; ends, Toole, Gilbert; quarter, French i; flying wing, 
Lambert; halves, Huycke i, McMurrich, Dobell i. Subs: Robson, 
Greig, Cox i. 



MIDDLESIDE 

IMPRESSIONS OF THE COACH 

After learning to work together last year on Littleside, 
the whole team moved up to Middleside this season; here, 
building on the knowledge of basic essentials acquired last 
year and strengthened by the addition of some talented 
newcomers, they have gradually developed into a co-opera- 
tive, well-balanced unit. Fortunate in a long schedule of 



60 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

games which enabled them to put their theory learned 
throughout the season to a practical test, they made their 
enthusiasm for the game and "never-say-die" spirit com- 
pensate for their comparative youthfulness and inex- 
perience in a league permitting the use of any six seven- 
teen-year-olds per game. 

As could be said of almost any team, there might be 
one or two players to whom all felt extra credit for the 
general success should go, but so truly a Middleside have 
they been, that impartial outsiders have been heard to re- 
mark they were all uniformly good, functioning as a unit, 
with few, if any, extremely outstanding, and none very 
poor. 

In spite of work, hard, steady and exacting, the spirit 
evidenced in the grind of practices and the strain of games 
was one to inspire friendship and enthusiasm among all. 
Each and every boy was concerned with the team's wel- 
fare as a whole and willing to let his alternate play or his 
teammate win the prominence, if it seemed to Middleside's 
advantage. 

The Ridley game, in the opinion of those who saw it, 
clearly showed Middleside's marked ability; their showing 
in that game alone could encourage them to hope that they 
might be found capable of attaining the aim of all football 
players at T.C.S. next fall. 

— G.A.H. 



SCHOOL vs. COBOUIIG 
At Cobourg, October 18 

In their first game at Cobourg, Middleside took C.C.I. 
12-6 in a closely fought battle. Soon after the kick off, 
T.C.S. moved down the field to get a point on a kick by 
Curtis. Cobourg had a chance to even the score but could 
not push the School over the line. Curtis then went over 
on a buck for an unconverted touch, giving T.C.S. a 6-0 
lead at the end of the first half. 

Cobourg kicked off and forced the School back, but a 
pass from French to Bowles pulled T.C.S. into kicking posi- 
tion. C.C.I, fumbled and Gibson recovered behind the line 




Back Ron'-.—R. P. Stokes, P. A. Richardson, P. 

Middle Row:— The Headmaster, W. ]. A, Toole, 

Front Row:—]. R. deC. Warner, C. A. W. Gill 

F. A. H. Greenwood. 



THE FIRST TEAM 
L, Gilbert, P. C. Dobcll, K. C. Lambert, H. French. 

J. K. P. Allen, G. P. ^'ernon, W. G. Phippen, D. D. Wilson, J. R. McMurrich, Mr. Hodgetts. 
m, D. A. Decker, E. T^cC. Sinclair, E. J. M. Huycke, P. H. Mclntyre, T. McC. Wade, 




DON HEReiB 



EDDIE 



hoftCH HUBIC 




V^ILLIE PAT 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 61 

to score another touchdown. In the last quarter, Quigley 
of C.C.I, passed to Baker for a converted touch. This was 
followed by a passing offensive by Cobourg which almost 
clicked, and the game ended after Curtis of T.C.S. had 
rouged to leave the score 12-6. 

Hass and Jamieson starred for Cobourg while French, 
Curtis and Lawson stood out for T.C.S. 

cobourg — Hass, Quigley, Cheeles, Janoieson, Anderson, Moha- 
qure, Hoseton, Hume, Harvey, Free, Baker, Moore, Shorey, Lees, 
Richards, Thompson. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady, Curtis, Lawson, Bird, Jarvis, French ii, Fisher, 
Bowles, Grier, Austin ii, McDougall, Kirkpatxick, Fennel, Hawke i, 
Gibson ii. Main, Currie, Mahaffy, Armour i, Dobell ii. 



SCHOOL vs. COBOURG 
At Port Hope, October 25 

Middleside took Cobourg for the second time in a fast 
game. 5-0. T.C.S. kicked off, giving Cobourg the ball for 
the first few minutes. C.C.I, could make no gains and 
taking possession the School marched down the field on 
bucks by Lawson, until Gibson managed to get away a kick 
for one point. In the second quarter, T.C.S. blocked a kick 
and pushed Cobourg back for a safety when Bird tackled 
Cheeles behind his line. Then Bowles of T.C.S. kicked a 
rouge to leave the score 4-0 at the end of the first half. 

The second half, although there was little score, was 
full of close calls for both teams. Cobourg attempted some 
long passes which failed to click, but they still pushed the 
School back for a near score until Lawson stopped the at- 
tack. Soon T.C.S. got the ball in C.C.I.'s territory and 
Bowles kicked a rouge to end the scoring at 5-0. 

T.C.S. stalwarts were Lawson, O'Grady and French, 
while Hass and Cheeles did well for Cobourg. 

Cobourg — Hass, Quigley, Cheeles, Jamieson, Anderson, Moha- 
qure, Hoseton, Hume, Harvey, Free, Baker, Moore, Shorey, Lees, 
Richards, Thompson. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady, Curtis, Lawson, Jarvis, Fisher, French ii. 
Bowles, Bird, Hawke i, Gibson ii, Fennel, Grier, Austin ii, McDougall, 
Kirkpatrick, Dobell ii, Hogarth, Paterson i, Currie, Mahaffy. 



62 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. RIDLEY 
At Toronto, October 28 

This was Middleside's second exhibition game, in which 
the School was defeated 19-11 in one of their best games 
of the season. 

Soon after T.C.S. kicked off, Bird of Trinity blocked 
a kick and recovered to set the School up for a rouge which 
was kicked by Curtis. Ridley then pushed up the field in 
a bucking offensive and Welshir kicked a point to even the 
score. T.C.S. almost got a break when Hawke caught a 
pass from French but lost the ball and were pushed back. 
Weld of B.R.C. then passed to Frost for a touchdown. T.C.S. 
evened up the score before the end of the first half when 
Lawson bucked over an unconverted touchdown making it 
6-6. 

In the second half Ridley blocked a kick and recovered 
the ball. Then Hiesketh went over for a touch, giving 
B.R.C. an 11-6 lead. This was followed by three long 
rouges for Ridley, all kicked by Welshir. T.C.S. was push- 
ed back for the fourth time by Ridley's bucks and Welshir 
kicked behind the Trinity goal. Tooton of B.R.C. ran back 
the returned kick for an unconverted touchdown making 
the score 19-6. Just before the game ended, French passed 
to Bird for a final touchdov/n making the final score 19-11. 

B.K.C. — Brandigee, Weld, Rigby, Wilshir, Faill, Tooton, Christie, 
Frost, Kindy, Heighington, Fox, Cressall, Prowe, Hiesketh, Galam, 
Hodgson, Nichols, Moffat, Keenlyside, Allen. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady, Curtis, French ii, Lawson, Bird, Hawke i, 
McDougall, Kirkpatrick, Mclntyre ii, Grier, Austin ii, Fisher, Jarvis, 
Bowles, Hyde, Gibson ii, Dobell ii, Armour i, Wigle, Bermingham, 
Paterson i, Mahaffy, Currie. 



SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE 
At Port Hoi>e, November 1 

This game against Port Hope was Middleside's last 
chance to win the C.O.S.S.A. but after a hard fight, they 
were overpowered 26-6 by a stronger Port Hope team. 

After T.C.S. kicked off. Port Hope started pounding 
at the School's line with bucks, and gradually pushed for- 
ward. Watson of P.H.H.S. finally bucked over an uncon- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 63 

verted touch for the first score in the game. Middleside 
charged back up the field with a series of quick plays. Law- 
son of the School bucked over for a touchdown to even the 
score. Just before the end of the first half Dotzko picked 
up a T.C.S. fumble and ran for a touch, making the score 
10-5. 

At the beginning of the third quarter T.C.S. completed 
two long successful plays, a thirty yard gain on an end run 
and a pass from French to Gibson, putting them two yards 
from a touchdown. But Port Hope recovered a Trinity 
fumble and the threat ended in Gibson's kick to the dead- 
line. Port Hope followed up with a touchdown made by 
Bissett. and Watson added another on a buck, to give Port 
Hope a 20-6 lead. The score remained so until Watson 
again went over on an unconverted major to leave the final 
score 26-6. 

Watson, Dotzko and Bissett starred for Port Hope, 
while Lawson, French and Grier played well for the School. 

Port Hope — Ingolpud, Watson, Brown. Watt, Mark, Dotzko, 
Lees, Saunders, Pollard, Jones, Currelly, Bissett, HoLman, Snelgrove, 
Cornish, Smith, Gidey. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady, Jarvis, Lawson, French ii, Grier, Mclntyre ii, 
McDougall, Kirkpatrick, Bird, Hawke i, Bowles, Mahaffy, Gibson ii, 
Fisher, Austin ii. Armour i, Wigle, Main, Hogarth, Dobell ii. 



SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH 

At Port Hope, November 11 

Middleside, in its last game of the C.O.S.S.A. league, 
defeated a heavier Peterborough team in a fast, exciting 
game by 8-1. 

Soon after the kick-off, T.C.S. marched down the field 
on a series of end runs and bucks and Pearson of the School 
kicked a single. T.C.S. pounded continually at the P.C.I. 
line and before the first quarter had ended, Lawson went 
over on a buck, converted by French. The score remained 
7-0 until McKieth of Peterborough kicked a point just be- 
fore the end of the first half. 

Play in the second half was even and P.C.I, came close 
to scoring a major, but the School managed to hold them 
for the third quarter. In the last few minutes of the game 



64 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

T.C.S. blocked a kick and got the ball on Peterborough's 
thirty yard line. Bird then took a pass from French and 
on the last play of the game Pearson kicked a single 
making the score 8-1. 

French, Pearson and Lawson starred for the School. 
Moyles played well for the losers. 

Peterborough — ^Borland, Moyles, Doughty, Richardson, Thomp- 
son, McDougall, Menzies, Frise, Addyman, Rush, Braund, Green, 
Bond, Mclntjo'e, Beavis, Martin. 

T.C.S. — O'Grady, Bird, Lawson, French ii, Grier, Fisher, Mc- 
Intyre ii, Pearson i, Jarvis, Bowles, McDougall, Austin ii, Hawke 1, 
Dobell ii, Wigle, MahafEy, Kirkpatrick, Armour i, Fennel, Main. 



SCHOOL vs. LAIiEFIELD 

At Port Hope, November 15 

In their final game of the season, Middleside trounced 
the Grove 33-6 in a fast moving and exciting game. Al- 
though the weather was cold, Middleside's passing led them 
to victory. 

The School opened the scoring on a rouge by Pearson i 
v/hich went well over Lakefield's line. The Grove followed 
up with an offensive which brought them to the School's 
twenty-five yard line but T.C.S. got the ball and pushed 
them back. Then Hawke took a pass from French ii and 
went over for a touchdown. French added the point. Early 
in the second quarter, Shanly of Lakefield kicked a single 
making the score 7-1 for the School. Again French com- 
pleted a pass to Hawke. Bird snagged another pass to 
score an unconverted major. Shortly after, Mclntyre of 
T.C.S. blocked a kick, recovered the ball and ran for an- 
other touchdown. Lakefield then came back up the field 
and Smart bucked over for a touch for the Grove, to make 
the score 17-6 at the end of the first half. 

In the second half, French again led off with a passing 
attach, this time to Jarvis, for a touch. The score remain- 
ed 22-6 for most of this half until Lawson bucked another 
unconverted touchdown. In the last moments of the game, 
Jarvis again caught a pass from French and made a touch- 
down, leaving the final score at 33-6. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 65 

Lakefield — Ker, Smart, Sinclair, Roy, Freethy, Giespecker, Lang- 

muir, MacDonald, Clair, Preston, Shanly, Mills; Alston, Whitfield, 
Nurse, Hutchings. 

T.C.S. — 0"Grady, French ii, Bird, Hawke i, Jarvis, Lawson, 

Pearson i, Fisher, McDougall, Kirkpatrick, Wigle, Main, Mclntyre ii, 

Austin ii, Grier, Dobell ii, Armour i, Pearson ii, Paterson i, Hyde, 
Mahafify. 



HOUSE GAME 

November 18 

On a wide open game, marred by frequent fumbles, 
Brent Middleside defeated a fighting Bethune team, 17-2. 
Despite the score, the game was undecided until the final 
quarter, when a powerful Brent drive netted them two 
touchdowns and the game. 

Bethune kicked off and after only a few minutes of 
play, O'Grady picked up a blocked kick, and raced forty 
yards for the first score, which Bird converted, to give 
Brent an early lead. At the start of the second period, an 
attempted field goal by French ii failed, but Roenisch was 
caught behind his own line for a single, making the score 
6-1. Brent then marched up the field, only to have a touch- 
down pass fail and Bethune replied with a march of their 
own, climaxed by two French-to-Hawke passes. Brent held 
and Lawson took them out of danger with a brilliant fifty 
yard buck, as the half ended. 

Brent kicked to open the second half and a Rogers-to- 
Goodbody pass put Bethune in scoring territory, where a 
fumble destroyed their chances. During the rest of the 
quarter, the play remained even, fumbles counteracting 
any advantages, until, early in the last quarter, Pearson i 
kicked another single to make the score 6-2. The rest of 
the game was dominated by a charging Brent team. Law- 
son bucked for five points, and on the last play of the game 
an end run pass from Roenisch to Bird was good, and Bird 
converted to make the final score 17-2. 

The bucking of Lawson and the all around play of 
O'Grady, Bird and Roenisch stood out for Brent while 
Pearson's kicking, the line play of Hawke and Grier and 
the passing of French ii showed up well for Bethune. 



66 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Bethime — French ii, Pearson i, Bowles, Dobell, Fennel, Good- 
body, Paterson i, Hawke i. Armour i, Grler, Austin ii, Rogers, Pear- 
son ii, Hogartli. 

Brent — O'Grady, Lawson, Bird, Jarvis, Mclntyre ii, Roenisch, 
Kirkpatrick, McDougall, Fisher, Main, Mahaffy, Wigle, Crowe. 



LITTLESIDE 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Toronto, October 28 

Littleside was edged out by Upper Canada 12-10 in a 
game that was in doubt right up to the final whistle. 

U.C.C. kicked off and play remained in the School end. 
Taking advantage of a fumble, Upper Canada scored a con- 
verted touchdown. In the second quarter T.C.S. showed a 
strong offensive and marched the length of the field for a 
major score, Payne earring it over. 

Opening the second half with new strength, Littleside 
scored in short order when Wells took Roger's pass for an 
unconverted touch to lead 10-6. Proving to have superior 
kicking hov/ever, the College advanced towards the School 
line, and scored a single point. Again due to their good 
kicking, U.C.C. moved into scoring position, and carried it 
across for the winning touchdown. In the closing minutes 
of the game T.C.S. threatened, but fell just short of their 
mark. 

U.C.C. — Hewitt, Kent, Davis, Murphy, Johnson, Howard, Gos- 
sage, Black, Bailey, Drewery, Seymour, Wales, Maclntyre. 

T.C.S. — Payne, Goodbody, Rogers, Wells, Wilson ii. Hall, Gaunt, 
Rickaby, Carhartt, Crowe, Thompson, McPherson, Pratt, Tessier, 
Deverall, Whitfield, Riddell. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 
At Port Hoi)e, November 1 

This was Littleside's third game of the season and it 
ended in a victory of 15-1 for the School. 

Lakefield kicked off and gaining possession, bucked 
their way up the field in very quick order, to kick a single. 
The School then pressed for the rest of the quarter, and on 
the Grove's ten yard line a bad snap was quickly snatched 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 67 

up by Hall, who ran over the Grove line for an unconverted 
touchdown. 

After this, the Grove attacked, and Beeve made a forty 
yard gain on an end run. But T.C.S. completed two passes 
from Rogers to Wells to keep the School in safety. The 
Grove got a break when they retrieved a T.C.S. fumble, 
which Langmuir ran for fifty yards, but the powerful T.C.S. 
line held and then began to push them until Rogers scored 
the School's second touch. 

In the second half, play was even, and centered mainly 
around the two hard fighting lines, until Lakefield opened 
up and began to throw many passes. An interception and 
a thirty yard run by Rogers was good for another School 
score. The game ended with the final score of 15-1 for 
T.C.S. 

Both teams played well, but Wells, Crowe, Rogers and 
Gaunt were the most outstanding for T.C.S., while Lang- 
muir, Beeve and Ker starred for the Grove. 

Lakefield — Langmuir, Beeve, Sinclair, Gordon, Ker, Diespeaker, 
MacDonell, Freethy, Shanly, Nurse, Mills, Alston. 

T.C.S. — Thompson, Payne, Rogers, Wilson, Wells, Huxley, Crowe, 
Rickaby, Gaunt, Goodbody, Carhartt, Hall. 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Toronto, November 4 

Littleside, in its last game of the year, lost a very good 
game to a stronger U.C.C. team 13-0. In the first quarter 
U.C.C. kicked off and gained possession of the ball at the 
T.C.S. forty-five yard line, where they were held for a vv^hile 
until Murphy broke through on a buck to score an uncon- 
verted touchdown. After this, and for the rest of the first 
half, U.C.C. prevented Littleside from gaining any yards at 
all, until the School broke through for a good gain on a 
long end run, which was only to be regained by long kicks 
by U.C.C. 

In the second half, U.C.C. still held Littleside and after 
many long end runs and bucks, they scored two rouges on 
kicks by Kent. Retaliating, T.C.S. marched up the field 
but missed several chances to score. Finally in the last 



6g TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

minutes of the game, after holding T.C.S. in their end for 
a whole quarter, Murphy of U.C.C. bucked over again for 
an unconverted touchdown. 

The starring players for U.C.C. were Kent and Murphy 
while for T.C.S., Rogers, Goodbody and Wells were out- 
standing. 

U.C.C. — Hewitt, Kent, Davis, Murphy, Johnson, Howard, Gos- 
sage, Black, Drewery, Seymour, Wales, Maclntyre. 

T.C.S. — Payne, Goodbody, Rogers, Wells, Wilson ii, Hall, Gaunt, 
Rickaby, Carhartt, Crowe, Thompson, McPherson, Pratt, Tessier, 
Deverall, Whitfield, Riddell. 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. PORT HOPE 
At Port Hope, October 25 

Littleside "B" won their second straight game when 
they defeated Port Hope 23-7. Port Hope took possession 
from the start and marched up the length of the field for 
a touchdown. Bailey carried it over. The convert was 
good. Cumming evened the score when he skirted the end 
for the first School touch. Bailey kicked a rouge to put 
Port Hope once more in the lead. A McPherson-to-Pratt 
pass set up the School's second touch. Cumming scored 
on a smash through centre. Port Hope opened up a passing 
attack in a vain hope to tie the score, but Whitfield inter- 
cepted and ran the remaining distance for a major score. 
The convert was completed. In the closing minutes of the 
game, Wilson completed McPherson's pass to score another 
converted touchdown. Pratt, Brodeur, Whitfield and Mc- 
Pherson starred for the School, while Bailey and Jeffories 
played well for the losers. 

Port Hope — Bailey, Jeffories, Jarvis, Tozer, Sandiland, Watts, 
Sneyd, Finnegan, Jex, Perry, Johnston, Dotzko. 

T.C.S. — Deverall, Tessier, McPherson, Whitfield, Cumming, Tay- 
lor ii, Hallward, Pratt, Campbell iii. Merry, Goering, Luke, Riddell, 
Palmer, Wismer. 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. LAKEFIELD 
At Port Hope, Noveinber 1 

The second Littleside squad lost for the first time, 
against a much stronger Lakefield team than they had play- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 69 

ed previously, by a score of 12-6, in a close hard-fought 
struggle. 

Lakefield drew first blood half-way through the first 
period when they bucked over for a major from the five 
yard line. Wailling converted. 

The School evened it up near the end of the first half 
by virtue of a touchdown by Taylor ii. A Cumming-to- 
Paterson iii pass was good for the convert. 

TTie last half was very even with very good play all 
the way through. The kicking on both sides kept the play 
at centre-field until, in the closing minutes of the game, 
Gibson of Lakefield fell on a fumbled ball behind the Trinity 
goal for another major. Again Wailling converted. 

Whitfield, Gumming and Taylor ii, starred for the 
School, while Gibson and Ried played well for the Grove. 

LakefieW — Annoley, Casson, Wailling, Stein, Greaison, McCul- 
loch, Gibson, Ried, Moich, Drew ii, Ketchum, Falkner, Sandborn, 
Hepburn. Burns, Jones ii, Gillhead, MacNagbton. 

T.C.S. — Deverall, Tessier, McPherson, Wbitfield, Gumming, Tay- 
lor ii, Hallward, Pratt, Campbell iii, Merry, Goering, Luke, Riddell, 
Palmer, Wismer. 



UTTLESIDE "B" vs. PORT HOPE 
At Port Hope, November 18 
Littleside "B" defeated Port Hope 6-0 in a game fea- 
turing long passes by both teams. The Port Hope squad 
at first held the School at centre field but McPherson's 
passing to Wells, Wilson and Gumming finally drove them 
back. Before the first half had ended, Wilson caught a 
long spiral from McPherson for a touchdown. McPherson 
converted. Play in the last half remained in Port Hope's 
end, although T.C.S. could not seem to push it over their 
Ime. The final score stood at 6-0 for the School. 

McPherson, Wells and Whitfield starred for T.C.S. 
Sneyd. Tozer and Dotzko played v.-ell for Port Hope. 

Port Hope — Jey, Tozer, Sneyd, Jarvis, Sandiland, Town, Jeffries, 
Dotzko, Guy, Perry, Bailey, Finnegan, Asbby, Lingard, Watt. 

T.C.S. — Wilson ii, McPnerson, Payne, Wells, Hall, Pangman, 
Gumming. McDonough, Deverall, Riddell, Whitfield, Palmer. 



70 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

HOUSE GAME 
November 16 

This year, Brent came out on top in their annual House 
game against Bethune by a score of 6-5. The game was 
very close as can be seen by the score. Brent started the 
scoring after Gumming recovered a blocked kick and Crowe 
went over for an unconverted touchdown. Thompson kick- 
ed a single to give Brent a 6-0 lead at the end of the first 
half. Just before half time Goodbody of Bethune passed 
to Rogers for a major, unconverted. There was no scoring 
in the second half and the final score stood at 6-5. 

Bethune — Goodbody, Carson, Goering, Hall, McDonough, McPher- 
son, Palmer, Pangrnan, Pratt, Rogers, Wells, Wilson ii. 

Brent — Crowe, Thompson, Wliltfield, Riddell, Tessier, Gaunt, 
Hallward, Huxley, Payne, Carhartt, Rickaby, Wismer, Deverall, 
Cununing. 



THE KICKING, CATCHING AND PASSING 
COMPETITION 

November 9 

The Orchard Cup for Kicking, Catching and Passing 
was won at last by a backfielder on Bigside football. Al- 
though heavily pressed by soccer's Harry Cox, Huycke i 
was able to take the competition by virtue of his excellent 
passing. Cox i finished second. Sinclair, another football 
player, came third while Lambert and Howard placed fourth 
and fifth respectively. The results of the first five were as 
follows: — 

1. Huycke i 228 

2. Cox i 227.5 

3. Sinclair 222 

4. Lambert 221 

5. Howard 219 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 71 




1944 SOCCER 



IMPRESSIONS OF THE COACH 

We have always maintained that the chief purpose of 
playing games is to find enjoyment, and that whatever 
success may attend the efforts of a team, if the element 
of joy is missing, then in our opinion, this means failure. 
For games to be enjoyed, the first essential is harmony 
within the team, and the basis of this harmony is the iDaace 
of mind of the individual players. If they are harassed 
with pressure demanding victory, the emotional atmosphere 
in which the game is played may make virtually imposGiblo 
the calmness necessary for playing the best soccer. The 
1944 season has been marked by a most harmonious spirit 
in the team, and we feel that the games have been 
thoroughly enjoyed. On these grounds then we feel that 
the season has been a most successful one. 

The beginning of the season found us with a nucleus 
of experienced players, and round that nucleus we were 
able to build a team which was very powerful in attack, 
although not quite so strong in defence. The forward line 
consisting of Conyers ii (left v\'mg). Brewer (inside left), 
Dawson (centre forward). Barber (inside right) and Cox i 
(right wing) was always dangerous. They showed what 
they could do in both the Upper Canada matches, especially 
the second one, and also in the game against Trinity Col- 
lege. Hare (right half) played an excellent offensive and 
defensive game. Cox ii (centre half) and Nicholson (left 
half) played hard but were inclined at times to play too 



72 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

far back and to hang on to the ball too long. Butterfield 
(right back) came on wonderfully and his performance in 
the final match of the season was brilliant. Edmonds (left 
back) has a powerful kick and in the earlier part of the 
season was very effective. Ingham, considering that this 
is his first season as a goalkeeper, played very well. 

We were very glad to play the matches against the 
R.A.F. and learnt much from their display. On all occa- 
sions, except the last match against Mountain View, the 
R.A.F. teams were markedly superior in skill and ex- 
perience. We should like to thank the officers and men 
of the Air Force at Mountain View for their hospitality. 

The addition of Trinity College to our list of fixtures 
is most welcome and we hope that it will become an annual 
encounter and that next year, the College will be able to 
send a team down to Port Hope to play us. We feel that 
the Trinity College game was the best of the season, finely 
contested and full of interest to the final whistle. The 
Upper Canada team was not so strong as that of last year. 
They played hard but had neither the combination nor in- 
dividual skill of our players. 

This impression would be incomplete without mention 
of the excellent, unobtrusive leadership of Cox i, who be- 
sides playing an outstanding game as an individual and as 
a member of a most dangerous combination with Barber 
and Brewer, showed qualities of sound judgment which 
proved a most valuable asset to the side. 

Altogether a most successful season. V\^e might even 
borrow the words of a colleague and say, "Another golden 
page has been added to the annals of the School". 

— R.H.T. 



SCHOOL vs. MOUNTAIN VIEW 

At Mountain View, October 25 

The School played their return game with Mountain 
View against an almost entirely different eleven, and were 
overwhelmed by a superior Air Force team. Hampered by 
a strong wind, the School could not produce the scoring 
punch they needed, and the Mountain View team ran up a 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 73 

4-0 lead by half time. In the second half the passing of 
the T.C.S. forwards did not click and the Air Force added 
nine more goals. Mountain View were definitely a smooth- 
passmg team, and outplayed the School throughout. The 
final score was 13-0 for the Air Force. 

Mountain View — ^White, Parker, Tatlock, Wiltshire, Foster, Mc- 
intosh, Graymore, McNeill, Lebof, Platford, Gregory. 

T.C.S. — Cox i, Barber, Dawson i. Brewer, Conyers ii, Hare, Cox ii, 
Butterfield i, Edmonds, Conyers i, Ingham. 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Toronto, November 4 

The return game with U.C.C, played on the Upper 
Canada field was undoubtedly one of the best matches of 
the season. The brilliant playing of the forward line, com- 
bined with the strong clearing of the backs and steady 
support of the halves resulted in a decisive win for the 
School. Upper Canada set the pace in the first few minutes 
of the game when they scored on a surprise break-away. 
However, T.C.S. recovered quickly and began a sustained 
drive on their opponents' goal in which Cox scored the 
first two goals for the School. To this, Brewer and Daw- 
son each added two more before half time. In the second 
half the accurate passing of the line again proved effective. 
both wings supplying the inside forwards with scoring 
passes. Conyers ii also notched a goal on a clever shot 
from the wing. Upper Canada rallied several times through- 
out the last half and were successful in scoring two more 
very good goals on break-aways before the final whistle. 

For Upper Canada, Mercer played a formidable game 
at centre half, while Peniston was dangerous in the forward 
line. Butterfield played very well on the School defence 
while all on the forward line gave an exceptionally good 
account of themselves. The final score stood at 12-3. 

U.C.C — Beckwith, Foster, Peniston, Thompson, Mercer, Damirez, 
DaniaLs. Peters, Davidson, Corp, Mathews. 

T.C.S. — Ingham, Edmonds, Butterfield i, Nicholson, Conyers ii, 
Cox ii, Hare, Brewer, Dawson, Barber, Cox i. 



74 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. MOUNTAIN VIKW 
At Port Hope, November 15 
The School played Mountain View R.A.F. for the third 
time, and were defeated 11-3. In the first few minutes of 
play White out-manoeuvred the backs and scored. How- 
ever, T.C.S. then opened up a strong forward attack and 
soon Brewer shot a goal, levelling the score. The School 
XI. kept up their pressure and with the good clearing of 
Butterfield and the support of Hare, the forward line 
proved to be effective and were rewarded by another goal 
headed in by Dawson. 

Mountain View rallied and scored three goals in quick 
succession, this making the game 4-2 at half time. The 
Air Force team maintained this strong attack in the second 
half v/ith good passing. Barber, due to a previous leg in- 
jury, was unable to continue playing and Dobell substituted 
for him. The Air Force's continuous accurate passing 
proved to be disastrous for T.C.S. However, Brewer scored 
again on a breakaway. When the final whistle had sound- 
ed the Air Force had amassed seven more goals, this 
making the final score 11-3. 

For Mountain View, Masteld, Tatlock, White and Yar- 
wood starred, whilst Brewer, Butterfield, Cox i. and Cox ii. 
played well for T.C.S. 

Mountain Viev*^ — Gregory, Taylor, Yarwood, Leeds, Foster, God- 
den, Wiltshire, Tatlock, White, MacNeill, Masteld. 

T.C.S. — Ingham, Edmonds, Butterfield i, Cox ii, Nicholson, Hare, 
Conyers ii. Brewer, Dawson, Barber, Cox i, Dobell i. 



SCHOOL \Ti. MOUNTAIN VIEW 

At Mountain View, November 18 

The Soccer team played their last game of the season 
at Mountain View, once again being beaten by this team. 
In the first half the School faced a light wind and were 
quite successful in defending their goal. Play was indeci- 
sive and it was some time before the Air Force scored 
their first goal. Ingham was beaten by another lonji: shot 
before T.C.S. really began to move. Brewer scored from 
close in on a very neat shot, and momentarily the Moun- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 75 

tain View team seemed to be taken a little off balance by 
the repeated sallies of the School forwards. However, be- 
fore half time, they were able to establish a lead of 6-3 by 
virtue of their accurate shooting. T.C.S. came back strong- 
ly in the second half with Cox i scoring two goals from 
close in. Mountain View, however, held doggedly to their 
lead by fast, accurate playing on the part of their inside 
forwards. Conyers ii closed the scoring on a brilliant shot 
from a very difficult angle on the wing, leaving the final 
score at 10-6 for Mountain View. White again played a 
fine game for the Air Force, as did MacNeill, Wiltshire and 
Tatlock, while Conyers ii, Butterfield i and Cox i stood out 
for the School. 

Mountain View — ^White, Parker, Tatlock, Wiltshire, Foster, Mc- 
intosh, Graymore, McNeill, Lebof, Platford, Gregory. 

T.C.S. — Ingham, Edmonds, Butterfield i, Nicholson, Cox ii, Hare. 
Conyers ii. Brewer, Dawson, Smith, Cox i. 



HOUSE GAME 

October 30 

The Bigside House game was won by Bethune 12-2. 
Although the play was not as the score would suggest, 
Bethune, made up of ten members of the first eleven, held 
the edge throughout. 

Cox i was the first marksman for Bethune, and was 
followed closely by Brewer who headed the ball for a two 
goal lead. Smith counted Brent's only goal of the first half. 
One by Dobell i and Dawson and two by Brewer completed 
the scoring of the first half. 

Bethune were slow to score in the second half, but 
Brewer finally broke through to start a barrage. Conyers ii, 
Dobell i, and Cox i each added counters before Brewer com- 
pleted his fifth successful shot of the game. Barber re- 
taliated when he scored on a beautiful solo effort for Brent's 
second goal. Dawson ended the scoring to give Bethune a 
12-2 decision. 

Cox i and Brewer starred for Bethune while Barber 
played spectacularly for Brent. 



76 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Betlmne — Ingham, Butterfield i, Edmonds, Hare, Nicholson, 
Cox ii, Brewer, Cox i, Dawson i, Dobell i, Conyers ii. 

Brent — Barrow, Allen, Long, Gibson i, Scott i, Stanger, Barber, 
Sinclair, Evans, Smith, McDowell. 



MIDDLESIDE 
IMPRESSIONS OF THE COACH 

Our Middleside soccer this year was not as powerful 
a team as last year's owing to the fact that we had to use 
most of our best players to form a second team for Big- 
side. The boys who played with and against our "stars" 
proved themselves expert and valuable. They tried out 
their mettle in playing two games against Upper Canada. 
The score in both games, although very low, was against 
us, yet the playing showed some talent that promised well 
for next year. 

Tony Barrow and Ian Campbell were elected Captain 
and Vice-Captain of Middleside. Their initiative and enter- 
prising spirit for organization helped much in keeping soc- 
cer up to the standard of former years. 

— F.P.G. 



SCHOOL vs. U.CC. 
At Toronto, November 4 

Middleside played their second game against U.CC. in 
drizzling rain. The going was hard and although Barrow 
scored the first goal, Gibbons of U.CC. scored both the 
equalizing and winning goals. The game was very slow 
throughout and it was touch and go for both teams, with 
each missing excellent chances to score. The hopes that 
the tying goal would be scored before full time, were dash- 
ed when the game ended with the School pressing hard. 

U.CC. — Morganstein, Moyer, Gibbons, Tonseia, Rogers, Cooper, 
Thompson, Wise, Kirby, Dougla-s, Moyse. 

T.C.S.— Ligertwood, Campbell i, Barrow, Conyers i, Long, Leh- 
man, Hardaker, Scott i, Evans, Gibson i, Smith, Bannister. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 77 

SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 
At Lakefield, November 29 

Middleside journeyed to Lakefield to play the Grove 
where the playing field was as hard as rock and covered 
with snow. Despite the cold weather and hard ground, 
quite a good game developed. The School started slowly 
and after negotiating several tight spots, including the re- 
moval of Gordon due to a knee injury, Allen succeeded in 
breaking the Grove defense with a hard shot. Play see- 
sawed back and forth for the rest of the half with the 
School protecting its lead. Lakefield organized several 
ganging attacks but T.C.S. successfully waded olf the Grove 
until, with about three minutes remaining, Sinclair tied the 
score from a muddle in front of the goal. The score stayed 
tied for the remainder of the game with Allen and the other 
forwards desperately attempting to score the winning goal. 

Allen, Scott i, and Conyers i were best for the School. 
Conyers i setting up the play for Allen's goal. Sinclair 
was the best of the Lakefield players. 

Lakefield — Alston, Preston, Sinclair, Reeve, Nurse, Diespecker, 
Treethy, Childs, Smart, Shandy, Ker. 

T.C.S. — Ligertwood, Allen, Conyers i, Scott i, Matthews, Gordon, 
Long, Lehman, Bannister, Barrow, Evans, Stanger. 



HOUSE GAME 

Noveinber 13 

Bethune House defeated Brent in a closely contested 
game of 3-0. During the first half there was no score and 
it was still either team's game. Bethune's constant attacks 
however, led by Campbell i finally resulted in two quick 
goals, one by Campbell and the other by Barnes. Twice 
Brent almost evened the score, until Hardaker of Bethune 
drove home a final point to end the game. 

Campbell, Hughes and Barnes starred for Bethune 
while Barrow and McDowell played well for the losers. 

Bethune — Campbell i, Hardaker, Barnes, Butterfield ii, Dumford, 
Hughes. Dobell li, Bronfman, Baker, Newcomb, Collins. 

Brent — ^Barrow, McDowell i, Stanger, Malloch, Lamb, Curtis, 
Hibbard, McDougall, Jarvis, Ray, Gill. 



78 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

LITTLESIDE 
IMPRESSIONS OF THE COACH 

The Littleside soccer team was substantially the same 
as last year's. By keeping each player to his own position 
throughout the season we succeeded in obtaining some good 
and sound team work, which, developed and perfected, 
should give us a first class Bigside team in the near future. 

All the boys on Littleside showed keenness and en- 
thusiasm in trymg to play the game scientifically. Dicky 
Butterfield, as Captain, Jack Hughes, as Vice-Captain, Mar- 
tin McDowell as centre forward, and others displayed real 
ability as potential first team players. 

For the first time in the history of our School, Little- 
side went to Toronto to play a Toronto Public School, the 
Maurice Cody School. We lost that game but we won quite 
brilliantly the return match, in which our boys showed team 
spirit at its best. 

Coaching soccer this season was a very pleasant job 
thanks to the willing co-operation we had from all the 
players and we are looking forward to an even better and 
more successful season next year. 

— F.P.G. 



SCHOOL vs. MAURICE CODY SCHOOL 
At Toronto, November 11 

In Littleside's first game, Maurice Cody School turned 
them down 1-0. Though they had the edge most of the 
time, T.C.S. was blocked from many chances to score by a 
stalwart Maurice Cody defense. Play in the first half was 
fairly even, but after half-time, the ball remained in the 
Maurice Cody end of the field most of the time. Playing a 
defensive game, they managed to hold back the surging 
attack of the School forwards till well on in the second half, 
when a Maurice Cody rush overpowered the T.C.S. de- 
fense for the lone goal made by Woods. After this T.C.S. 
pressed but the final attempt to tie it up was checked and 
there was no further score. Woods, small, but fast and 
tricky, was outstanding for Maurice Cody. Barnes starred 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 79 

for T.C.S., in goal for the first half; and as a forward in the 
second half certainly deserved a goal on his play. In- 
dividually Littleside played well, but lacked the combina- 
tion necessary for success. 

Maurice Cody — Passmore, Oag, Gates, B. Wheeler, Clewse, Clark, 
A. Wheeler, Woods, Jaques, Panes, Chandler. 

T.C.S. — Barnes, Barton, Harley, Butterfield ii. Armour ii, Lamb, 
Snowdon, McDowell, Stone, Prentice, Sanborn, Hughes, Paterson ii, 
Watts. 



SCHOOL vs. MAURICE CODY SCHOOL 

At Port Hope, November 25 

In their second game against Maurice Cody School, 
Littleside turned them down 3-0. Maurice Cody School 
played well but they were no match for the superior T.C.S. 
team. The first goal was scored by McDowell on a scramble. 
Sanborn kicked in another on a beautiful pass from Hughes. 
Towards the end of the game, Prentice scored the best 
goal for T.C.S. from the wing on a high shot which slipped 
into the upper corner of the goal. Woods played well for 
Maurice Cody while the School team played excellently as 
a whole. The final score was 3-0. 

Maurice Cody — Passmore, Oag, Gates, B. Wheeler, Cleuse, Black, 
A. Wheeler, Woods, Jaques, Panes, Chandler. 

T.C.S. — McDowell, Sanborn, Stone, Barnes, Prentice, Barton. 
Harley, Lamb, Gill, Hughes, Butterfield ii. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 
At Lakefield, November 29 

In Littleside' s final game, they were held to a tie by the 
Grove 1-1. The first half was featured by the even play 
of both teams, but before ends changed, Huddard put Lake- 
field ahead. Fighting hard to overcome the lead, the T.C.S. 
forwards were finally rewarded, when Paterson rang up the 
lone T.C.S. goal. There was no further score. 

Lakefield — Lories, Small, Hutchings, Drew, Duff, Hicks-Lyne. 
Arteacon, Huddard, Widdifield, Gibson, Russel. 

T.C.S. — Buttei-field ii, Hughes, Barnes, McDowell, Barton, Har- 
ley. Prentice, Stone, Armour, Lamb, Sanborn, Paterson ii. 



80 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

HOUSE GAME 
November 14 

The Littleside House game was won by Brent by a 
close 3-1 margin. Wells scored the opening goal of the 
game for Bethune on a corner kick that beat the Brent 
goaler. There was no further scoring during the half and 
play remained at centre for the greater part of the time. 
In the second half, Brent came to life and scored three 
goals, Paterson ii, Whitfield and McDowell i being the 
marksmen. The final score stood at 3-1. 

Brent — McDowell i, Whitfield, Paterson ii, Gaunt, Lamb, Crowe. 
Prentice, Thompson, Watts, Gill, Payne. 

Bethune — Butterfield ii, Hughes, Barnes, Wells, Goodbody, San- 
born, Goering, McDonough, Wilson ii. Merry, Barton, McPherson. 



FOOTBALL COLOURS 

The following have been awarded Rugby Colours: — 

First Team — Decker, Dobell i, French i, Gillan, Greenwood, 
Mclntyre i, McMurrich, Huycke i, Lambert, Richard- 
son, Sinclair, Vernon, Wade, Warner, Wilson i. 

Half First Team — Allen, Gilbert, Phippen, Stokes, Toole. 

Middleside — Greig, Howard, Pearson i, Robson, Roenisch; 
Austin ii, Bird, Bowles, Curtis, Dobell ii, Fennel, 
French ii, Fisher, Gibson ii, Grier, Hawke i, Jarvis. 
Kirkpatrick, Lawson, McDougall, Mclntyre ii, O'Grady. 

Littleside — Armour i, Currie, Hyde, Mahaffy, Main, Pater- 
son i. Wigle; Brodeur, Carson, Crowe, Gumming, Deve- 
rall, Gaunt, Goering, Goodbody, Hall, Huxley, McPher- 
son, Pangman, Payne, Pratt, Rickaby, Riddell, Rogers, 
Tessier, Thompson, Wells, Wilson ii. 



SOCCER COLOURS 

The following have been awarded Soccer Colours: — 

First Team — Butterfield i, Barber, Brewer, Conyei-s ii, Cox i, 
Cox ii, Dawson, Hare. 

Half First Team — Edmonds, Ingham, Nicholson. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 81 

Middleside — Bannister, Barrow, Campbell i, Conyers i, Dob- 
son, Evans, Gibson i, Hardaker, Lehman, Ligertwood. 
Long, Matthews, Scott i. Smith. 

Littleside — Armour ii, Barnes, Barton, Butterfield ii, Gill, 
Harley, Hughes, McDowell, Paterson ii, Prentice, San- 
born. 



THE ANNUAL OXFORD CUP CROSS-COUNTRY RACE 

November 10 

The Oxford Cup this year was run over a muddy 
course, and the fast time of 24 minutes, 54 seconds was 
especially good, considering the conditions. Competition 
was very keen and interest ran high for weeks before the 
race. 

First in over the four mile stretch was Cox i, closely 
followed by Howard who had paced him for the last mile 
and a half to within a few hundred yards of the finish. 
Cox ii, Stratford and Barber placed third, fourth and fifth 
to clinch the honour positions. Special mention ought to 
be made of George Day who ran part of the way with a 
broken bone in his leg; though he thought it was merely a 
sprain. The first nine boys finished in under twenty-seven 
minutes, a splendid effort. 

Brent won the race by a narrow margin having the 
lowest aggregate. The following is a table of the points: 
Runner Brent Bethune 

Cox i 1 

Howard 2 

Cox ii 3 

Stratford 4 

Barber 5 

Barrow 6 

Gibson ii 7 

Austin i 8 

Day 9 

Lambert 10 

26 29 

Oxford Cup Colours were awarded to the following: — 
Cox i, Howard, Cox ii, Stratford, Barber. 



82 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Squash 

E. Howard has been appointed Captain of Squash Rac- 
quets for 1944-1945. 



Hockey 

Bigside Hockey has already made two successful trips 
to Oshawa, and a further one is projected. As usual many 
boys are trying for the first team, and, with seven members 
of last year's Bigside on hand again this season, the pro- 
spects seem bright. 



Basketball 

The Basketball team has held a number of practices 
this year in preparation for their first game which takes 
place a few days after the Lent term begins. Mr Hodgetts, 
the hockey coach, has taken over coaching duties from Mr. 
Jarvis for the time being. Further arrangements are to be 
made after Christmas. Three first team colours are again 
with us, and these, with a number of enthusiastic new boys 
and members of last year's squad, ought to produce a fine 
team. 




THE 
JUNIOR SCHOOL 

RECORD 




VOL. 48, NO. 2. 



DECEiMBER, 1944. 



84 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



THE JUNIOR SCHOOL RECORD 

Editor-in-Chief M. E. Wright 

Assistants D. A. Chester, T. G. R. Brinckman, 

P. T. Macklem, P. B. Mackenzie 

Our best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a very 
Happy New Year to all at the Junior School. 

The Hallowe'en party was a very successful event of 
this term. The costumes were very good indeed and show- 
ed much ingenuity on the part of the people who "created" 
them. The judges had a difficult time trying to decide on 
the winners. A new feature in the games was a Masters 
block race! Prizes were awarded as follows: First prize 
for Best Costume, "The Spotted Cow" (Wyman, Panet, 
Gill) ; Honorable Mention "First Aid Detachment" (Gate, 
Hogarth, Herridge) ; Prize for Funniest Costume "The Rab- 
bit" (van Straubenzee) ; Prize for Most Original Costume 
"The Hoarder" (Saunders). 

About fifty new books have been added to the Library 
this year and good use is being made of them. With the 
return to the market of model aeroplanes, the Hobby Room 
has taken on a new lease of life and some very good flying 
models are in production. 

We are most grateful to Huycke, Sinclair, Hope and 
Roenisch for the help they so willingly gave us in refereeing 
our rugby games. They did a good job and it was much 
appreciated by everybody. 

Our sincere thanks to Bob Briden for a gift of two new 
cricket balls and also to Ian Stewart for a First Team 
sweater and some football equipment. 



School Appointments 

Hobby Room Warden A. G. T. Hughes 

Assistants A. W. H. Brodeur, M. J. Dignam 

Assistant Librarians M. E. Wright, H. E. Thompson 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 85 

A "GORPY" TALE 

The night was dark and dreary, 

And the wind howled through the trees; 

I was sleeping very soundly 

Till awakened by a sneeze. 

And then around me I did look, 
And found me in a "lab"; 
My head was resting on a book. 
My feet were on a slab. 

A "gorpy" looking character, 

Was working at a bench; 

And from the test-tubes in his hands. 

There arose on awful stench. 

He turned around and looked at me, 
And said: "Ah! you're awake; 
And now I shall carve you up, 
For the Zombies' sake". 

"You see, the men that brought you here, 
Are Zombies in my care. 
Their human parts are showing 
Strong signs of wear and tear". 

"Now let me see, I need a nose. 
An eye, and lots of teeth, 
And different parts which you possess, 
The Zombies to bequeath". 

He took a knife and sharpened it, 
With evil in his eye; 
I looked at him and then I knew. 
That I was going to die. 

He came closer, ever closer. 
With that evil in his eyes; 
And, as he pricked my throat, I felt 
My hair begin to rise. 



86 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

He took a fiendish sweep, and then, 
I knew my end was there; 
I said my prayers, and for a change, 
I said then with much care. 

My past life flashed before me, 
I saw the wrong I'd done. 
Suddenly I then woke up, 
To be blinded by the sun. 

— (T. G. R. Brinckman and P. B. Mackenlie) 



ESCAPE FROM MURDER 

It was a desperate battle. It was fighting more fiercely 
than I had ever seen one fight. It felt like fifty pounds at 
least. I could hardly keep it from breaking away. It 
quieted down for a second until I thought I had almost lost 
it, then, suddenly it darted to the full length of the line 
and it took all my strength to hold it from breaking my 
line. This certainly must hold the record of all our records! 
It fought like a wild bull! Then it quietened down for a 
second, like the first time, until I was sure it had got away; 
then, as before, it darted right up to the surface and broke 
the still water. With a faint splash a small fish broke the 
water and I was maddened at the thought of reeling in a 
six inch perch from the bottom of the lake. 

"Poor little thing", said my sister looking up from her 
book at the other end of the boat. 

"Aw, isn't he cute", said I; but in truth I felt like per- 
forming cold blooded murder on the poor innocent little 
fish. 

"Put him back quickly", yelled my sister. 

In disgust I threw him as far as I could throw him. 
Afterwards the thought came to me that I could have used 
him for bait! 

— (D. A. Chester) 



A CHEMIST'S NIGHTMARE 

"I've got it! I've got it!" exclaimed Zachary Scott as 
he lowered the misty test-tube into its wire holder. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 87 

Semplan University's head chemist took a musty hand- 
kerchief from the breast pocket of his smock and applied 
it to his forehead with a contented sigh. 

Zachary Scott was a man of about thirty who fitted the 
description of "tall, dark and handsome" to a tee. He'd 
really been a chemist all his life, starting with a little acci- 
dent in his uncle's barn. Scott had been working on a new 
formula which he called Blue Nitroline from the time he 
had joined the staff of the University, two years ago. 

At last the experiment was complete. Blue Nitrolene. 
the most powerful acid yet. Blue Nitrolene, that can eat its 
way through the toughest steel in seconds was created at 
the hands of Zachary Scott, chemist. Weary from months 
of work, Scott flopped on to the army cot in the corner ot 
the laboratory and fell into a dreamy sleep. 

Zachary Scott arose and looked around the laboratory. 
He must have been sleeping for hours, he must get back to 
his vrork for there Vv^as no time to lose. He turned up the 
Bunsen burner to about half full, took the special container 
with the Blue Nitrolene in it and placed it in the holder over 
the blue flame. Then he took a piece of Litmus paper out 
of an envelope and placed it over the container. If the 
Litmus paper re-acted he would have succeeded. Minutes 
went by, still there was no reaction. Scott was nervous 
now and his gaze was steady on the paper. Suddenly there 
was a crash and a tingling of glass ! He whirled on impulse 
and as he did his hand knocked over the container with its 
deadly contents. The Blue Nitrolene began to spread, it 
ate its way through the bench and began to eat a great 
hole in the floor. If it was not stopped it would eat its 
way under the laboratory resulting in its collapse. Some 
sixth sense warned Scott, but it was too late to avoid the 
falling beam, there was a dull thud and then he was falling 
— falling — falling into a pit of dark nothingness. 

Scott rubbed his eyes and started to get up from the 
cot, but a sharp pain at the back of his head made him 
groan and relax again. He felt the vicinity of the pain and 
found a large lump. At the foot of the cot lay a granite 
stone and under the laboratory bench there was another 



88 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

one which some mischievous boy had thrown through the 
window. Scott suddenly reaUzed that what had happened 
was really a dream and that the shattering glass and the 
falling beam had been the rocks. Glad, that this little 
episode had brought the lethal possibilities of Blue Nitro- 
lene to his mind, he would destroy it for ever as a public 
enemy and an uncontrollable menace. 

— (W. M. Carroll) 



ATHLETICS 

Rugby 

Captain of Rugby A. G. T. Hughes 

Vice-Captain of Rugby N. F. Thompson 

The Rugby team this year will go down as one of the 
best teams the J.S. has had for several years. The strength 
of any team lies in the ability of the individuals on it to 
play together as a unit; the team this year showed all 
through the season that they had this ability. In two of 
our games we started out on the short end of a score, but 
managed to come from behind to tie it up. This is also 
one of the earmarks of a good team, especially in Junior 
football. Excellent tackling and plunging were probably 
the main features of the team's play. Great credit should 
also be given to the often unspectacular, but nevertheless 
essential work of the players in the line. They did their 
job well in all our games. The switch-over from the hud- 
dle system to signals seems to have worked well. It did 
much to speed up our play and to produce quicker thinking 
on the part of the players. All of our games were very 
closely contested and the season's record of two wins, two 
losses, and one tie may be considered a very satisfactory 
one. 



Rugby Colours 



The following have been awarded First Team Rugby 
Colours:— A. G. T. Hughes, G. K. Stratford, H. E. Thomp- 
son, N. F. Thompson, J. F. D. Boulden, J. S. Knox, R. J. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 89 

Moffit, A. W. H. Brodeur, H. C. McConnell, D. A. Chester, 
D. V. Ketchum. D. I. F. Graham. 

Half Colours: — J. A. Lawson, A. D. Howard, J. B. 
Rogers. 



SCHOOL vs. S.A.C. 
At Port Hope, October 21 

The School got off to a rather shaky start due to a 
fumble on S.A.C.'s kick-off to us. This proved very costly 
as it resulted in a touchdown during the first three minutes 
of the game. The convert was blocked by T.C.S. Later 
on in this first quarter S.A.C. again found themselves in a 
position to score and kicked for a rouge. The School came 
back very strongly in the second quarter and scored a 
touchdo\\Ti on an intercepted forward pass by Boulden. The 
first half ended with the score at 6-5 for S.A.C. The play 
was very even for the last half of the game with both sides 
going all-out. A kick by Knox brought T.C.S. a rouge dur- 
ing the third quarter and S.A.C. scored an unconverted 
touchdown towards the end of this quarter on a blocked 
kick. Neither side scored in the fourth quarter. Final 
score: S.A.C. 11, T.C.S. 6. 

T.C5.8. — Hughes (Capt.), Thompson i, Thompson ii, Boulden, Bro- 
deur, Stratford, Knox i, Ketchum i, Chester, McConnell, Moffitt, 
Graham. Subs: Wright, Bate, Rogers, Potter, Howard. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 

At Lakefield, October 26 

This game was a very hard-fought and close one from 
beginning to end. Lakefield opened the scoring in the first 
quarter with an unconverted touchdov/n on a breakaway 
by Ketchum. Both teams had some good opportunities to 
score before half-time, but failed to make the best of them. 
T.C.S. pressed very strongly throughout the third quarter 
scoring an unconverted touchdown on a forward pass from 
Thompson ii to Hughes. A kick for a rouge by Knox dur- 
ing the fourth quarter put T.C.S. ahead until the last two 



90 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

minutes of the game when Ketchum rouged T.C.S. to tie 
the score. Final score: T.C.S. 6, Lakefield 6. 

T.C.S. — Hug-hes (Capt.), Thompson i, Thompson ii, Boulden, Bro- 
deur, Stratford, Knox i, Moffitt, Chester, McConnell, Ketchum i, 
Lawson. Subs: Graham, Rogers , Howard, Wright. 



SCHOOL vs. RIDLEY 

At Upper <. aJiada, October 31 

Played under ideal weather conditions, this game 
stands out as the best of the entire season. Ridley had an 
excellent team and were a constant threat due to the out- 
standing running of their captain who contributed a major 
part of their score. T.C.S. showed greater strength in 
plunging and line work and on several occasions moved the 
yardsticks right down the field, but failed to capitalize on 
their opportunities. The tackling of both teams was very 
good. Ridley got off to a very quick start and scored two 
touchdowns on end runs (one unconverted) during the first 
quarter. The second quarter saw T.C.S. stage a come-back 
which netted them a rouge. The School definitely domina- 
ted the entire third quarter v/ith Stratford scoring an un- 
converted touchdown. Another touchdown was scored on 
a run by Thompson i and Thompson ii from behind our own 
goal line; this, however, was called back on an offside pass 
and one point awarded to Ridley. Ridley showed a great 
return to form in the last quarter scoring two converted 
touchdowns. During the last five minutes of play T.C.S. 
came back strongly, driving from their own ten yard line 
to the Ridley five, but were unable to do more than kick for 
a rouge. Final score: Ridley 24, T.C.S. 7. 

T.C.S. — Hughes (Capt.), Thompson i, Thompson ii, Boulden, Bro- 
deur, Startford, Knox i, Ketchum i, Chester, McConnell, Howard, 
Lawson. Subs: Graham, Rogers, Mackenzie i. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEIFIELD 
At Port Hope, November 10 

The return match with Lakefield proved just as close 
a contest as the first game. T.C.S. used the on-side kick to 
great advantage during the whole game and got their first 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 91 

score when Hughes recovered an on-side kick in the first 
quarter and ran for a touchdown which he also converted. 
Lakefield came back with a converted touchdown during the 
second quarter and the score was tied at half-time. Kiiox 
made a good run for a touch during the third quarter and 
Hughes kicked the convert. Lakefield scored a rouge dur- 
ing the same period. An unconverted touchdown by Lake- 
field in the last quarter tied up the score again until about 
the last play of the game when Knox kicked a rouge for 
the winning point. Stratford's plunging for T.C.S. was an 
outstanding feature of the game. Final score: T.C.S. 13, 
Lakefield 12. 

T.C.S.^ — Hughes (Capt.), Thompson i, Thompson ii, Boulden, Bro- 
deur, Startford, Knox i, Ketchum i, Chester, McConnell, MofEitt, 
Graham. Subs: Rogers, Lawson, Howard, Mackenzie i. 



HOUSE GAMES 

Because our schedule of School games ran on later than 
usual, it was not possible to play the three game series in 
Inter-House Rugby which we have been running for the 
past three or four years. Although a "sudden death" game 
had been decided on, it was still necessary to play two 
games as the first one was a draw 6-6. The first half of 
the second game saw a lot of fumbles by both teams and 
the ball changed sides frequently. Orchard showed greater 
strength, up to half time scoring two unconverted touch- 
downs to Rigby's one. Heavy tackling by both sides kept 
the second half of the game scoreless. Final score: Orchard 
10, Rigby 5. 

Orchard — Thompson i (Vice-Capt. ), Knox i, McConnell, Howard, 
Tessier, Dignam ii, Carroll, Hogarth, Croll, Brinckman i, Ketchum ii, 
Thornton. 

Rigby — Thompson ii (Capt.), Boulden, Brodeur, Chester, Grout, 
Ketchum i, Lawson, Mackenzie i, Potter, Rogers, Wright. Subs: 
Panet, Weicker, McGaghey. 



SOCCER 

Captain of Soccer W. R. Wyman 

Vice-Captain of Soccer P. A. C. Ketchum 



92 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

The soccer team has completed a very successful sea- 
son and has shown up as a very good team — probably as 
good as any we have had for several years. All members 
of the team played their positions well and the combination 
between the forwards and the halves was excellent. Al- 
though frequently outmatched in size, the team showed 
that its skill was enough to make up for this. 

The following have been awarded Soccer Colours: — 
W. R. Wyman, P. A. C. Ketchum, R. M. Hogarth, C. Panet, 
N. R. Sowdon, D. A. Foster, R. M. McDerment, C. N. Pitt, 
J. H. Gill, B. W. Gate. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 

At Lakefield, October 27. — At Port Hope, November 16 

The School had the best of the play in both these games 
due to the fact that they played better together as a team 
and kept their positions. 

Scores: At Lakefield: T.G.S. 2, Lakefield 0. 
At Port Hope: T.G.S. 3, Lakefield 0. 



SCHOOL vs. CRESCENT 

At Toronto, November 1. — At Port Hope, November 14 

The two games with Grescent showed some excellent 
soccer on both sides. In the first game the School opened 
the scoring on a goal by Foster followed shortly by a goal 
for Grescent to make the scored tied at half time. Grescent 
showed greater strength in the second half scoring two 
goals, although T.G.S. had some good chances to score. 
Final score: Grescent 3, T.G.S. 1. 

The School played its best game of the season in the 
return game. They played good, aggressive soccer from 
the beginning and scored their first goal early in the game. 
Although they threatened several times, they did not score 
again in the first half. About the middle of the second half 
the School scored again and the game ended with a strong 
drive by Grescent which did not, however, bring them any 
score. Final score: T.G.S. 2. Grescent 0. 

Soceer Team: — Wyman i, Ketchum ii, McDerment, Panet, Pitt, 
Foster, Gill, Hogarth, Sowdon, Gate, Church, Southam (goal), Van 
den Bergh (sub-goal). Linesman: Peters. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



93 



TolD 





NOTES <. 




OLD BOYS' NOTES— I— On Active Service 

HONOURS 

The citation covering the D.S.O. awarded to Brigadier 
J. G. Spragge, ('18-'24), O.B.E., E.D., on October 13, 1944, 
reads as follows: "On 6 June, 1944, as Commanding Officer 
of one of the Assault Battalions, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Spragge landed immediately behind his leading Companies 
at Bemieres-Sur-Mer and continued to direct his Battalion 
from among the forward troops during the advance inland 
until the capture of the Brigade's final objective in the 
evening of D-Day. He then re-organized his Battalion on 
its objective and co-ordinated the defence of his own and 
the Battalion on his right. After the initial assault pro- 
gress was slow and his Battalion was ordered to push on 
with all haste in order to ensure that the high ground 
which was the final objective was secured before dark. 
That this operation was successfully carried out was large- 
ly due to the personal drive of this Officer On 11 June, 
1944, when his Battalion was supporting an Armoured At- 
tack this Officer personally accompanied his two leading 
Companies. Strong enemy resistance broke up this attack, 
during which, one of the Companies suffered very heavily. 
By a quick decision made under heavy nre Lieutenant- 
Colonel Spragge was able to manoeuvre the remainder of 
his force and successfully carry out his new plan. Through- 
out the first day's fighting and in this subsequent action 
Lieutenant-Colonel Spragge displayed marked courage, 
coolness and determination, and by his leadership ensured 
the successful carrying out of the tasks given to his Bat- 



94 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

talion. His actions throughout were an example to all 

ranks." 

***** 

The citation covering the D.S.O. awarded to Wing 
Commander Dal Russel ('26-'34) D.F.C. & bar, reads as 
follows: "In recent intensive air operations the squadrons 
under the command of Wing Commander Russel have com- 
pleted a large number of sorties. Within a period of three 
days a very large number of transport vehicles were at- 
tacked, of which 127 were set on fire and a bigger number 
damaged. In addition four hostile aircraft were destroyed 
and seventeen tanks and nineteen other armoured vehicles 
were damaged. By his masterly leadership, sound judge- 
ment and fine fighting qualities Wing Commander Russel 
played a good part in the success achieved. His example 
inspired all". 

* * * =": * 

Captain Harry Godshall ('26-'33) with General Raton's 
3rd Army near Metz, has been awarded the Bronze Star 
Medal. The complete citation is not available as yet but 
we quote from a letter written by General D. A. Stroh: 
"This award was made by virtue of meritorious achieve- 
ment on the field of battle". 



Lieut. Gordon K. Jones ('37-'39), United States Army 
Air Corps has been awarded the D.F.C. and Air Medal with 
four oak leaf clusters for his distinguished work as a pilot 
in Africa, Italy, and India. 



WOUNDED 



Lieut. A. V. L. Mills ('29-'35), the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada, was wounded in Holland on October 13 
while serving with his regiment in an attack which proved 
to be quite an expensive one. He had bullet wounds in his 
upper right arm and one nicked the calf of his leg, so he 
was flown back to hospital in England. He writes his family 
that he is just leaving hospital for a convalescent home 
and expects to be back at the front soon. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 95 

Major J. R. Popham ('28-'29) who is serving overseas 
with the Black Watch has been reported wounded in action 
in Holland. 

Major Campbell Osier ('29-'37) of the 4th Canadian 
Anti-Tank Regiment, R.C.A., was wounded by an exploding 
shell in Italy on October 11. The shell exploded near his 
battery, wounding several other men as well as Major Osier. 

Lieut. W. G. Speechly (Master) of a Manitoba Regi- 
ment, was reported injured overseas in November. 

Capt. T. A. Staunton suffered injuries to his ear from 
blast and was sent back to England from France. 

Lieut. John Hayes has been reported wounded in 
France. 

Lieut. J. L. McLennan ('31-'36) was wounded in 
France in the early days of the invasion and is expected 
home very soon. 

Lieut. Roly Ritchie ('21-'26) was severely wounded in 
the first week of the invasion and is in hospital in Eng- 
land. 



The Headmaster has received letters from more than 
fifty Old Boys overseas, thanking the School for their kind- 
ness in sending them cartons of cigarettes. Somewhat to 
our surprise we have discovered that six or eight of the 
Old Boys do not smoke, but they found the cigarettes very 
useful as gifts or as means of acquiring other articles. We 
feel it was exceedingly good of the Old Boys to take the 
time in their busy and hazardous lives to write such let- 
ters. 

• « « • « 

Squadron Leader Cyril Holland-Martin, of Overbury 
Court. Tewkesbury, England, writes to say that he would 
be very glad to see any T.C.S. boys who would like to 
visit him. S/L. Holland-Martin was stationed in Canada 
for some two years and his boy, Geoffrey, was a member 
of the Junior School. He hopes that there may be an ex- 
change of Canadian and English school boys after the war 
in order to continue the relationship between the youth of 
both countries. 



96 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

The latest word of Gault Finley ('33-'40) is that he 
should be back on the next hospital ship which is expected 
towards the end of November; he seems to have made an 

excellent recovery. 

***** 

Brigadier-General Sir Godfrey Rhodes (01-'04), writes 
to thank the School for the cigarettes which he has re- 
ceived, and sends his best wishes to us. He spoke about 
the splendid work the Canadians have been doing on both 

fronts. 

***** 

Squadron-Leader Peter Heybroek ('33-'36) is at pre- 
sent instructing on Beaufighters in England but hopes to 
have leave in Canada very soon. Peter has done several 
tours of operations and everyone speaks highly of his work. 
He thanks th School for the "Records" which reach him 
regularly, and also for the cigarettes which were most wel- 
come. Incidentally, he says that he never hears anything 
but praise for T.C.S., even from Old Boys of other Little 
Big Four Schools. 

***** 

Lieut.-Colonel Fred Wigle ('29-'32) wrote at the end of 
September expressing his appreciation of the cigarettes and 
chocolate. He says that all the Old Boys feel very en- 
couraged to know that the School is keeping track of them. 
They had been having a very strenuous time in France for 
three months and Fred was looking forward to the day 
when the Old Boys could reunite again at Port Hope. 

* « « * « 

Sydney Lambert ('34-'43) has been undergoing train- 
ing for the Indian Army by taking part in manoeuvres for 
several days in pouring rain and under "blitz" conditions. 
He has also been representing the Indian Army in boxing 
bouts and he had won his fight. 

We had hoped that Syd would be at home on leave be- 
fore Christmas, but at the last moment his leave was can- 
celled and he was to embark for India early in December. 
Syd had seen a number of Old Boys, including Colin Patch 
('33-'41) in hospital, making a very good recovery. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 97 

Gault Finley says that he had seen Sandy Pearson 
('36-'40) who had been wounded by machine gun bullets in 
the leg, Jim Warburton ('34-'39), badly shot up in both 
legs but gettmg along very well, John Gray ('41-'44), Keith 
Russel ('34-'39), John Hayes ('35-'38) recovering from 
wounds he received in Holland, F/0 Carl Schaefer, Spec 
Dalton ('38-'41) awaiting posting to a Spitfire Wing ("Spec 
has grown three inches"), George Renison ('33-'38), Jock 
McLennan ('31-'36) who expected to be home pretty soon 
on leave after being wounded in France. Skip sends his 
best wishes to everyone at the School, 

***** 

Ross LeMesurier ('38-'42) is a Lieutenant with the 
Fifth Battalion Cameron Highlanders, British Liberation 
Army. His Regiment is in the 51st Division now serving 
under General Crerar. A number of other Canadians are 
with him and Ross seems to be very happy. 

Andrew LeMesurier ('36-'39) was switched from the 
48th. Highlanders to the Royal Canadian Regiment, but 
ultimately returned to the 48th. He was wounded on Octo- 
ber 18th in Italy, becoming seriously ill on the 19th. On 
the 21st. he was still seriously ill but his condition was im- 
proving. The wounds evidently consisted of shell frag- 
ments in the body. 

***** 

Capt. Eric Cochran ('28-'35) has been attached to 
Headquarters of the 2nd. Canadian Corps for some eight 
months. He mentions having seen Fred Wigle ('29-'32), 
Bill Broughall ('27-'32), and Al Staunton ('27-'31). Basil 
Southam ('28-'36) and BUI Braden ('29-'33) have been 
near him. Eric sends his congratulations to the School on 
winning the Imperial Challenge Shield and his best wishes 
to the rugby team. He recalls the game with Ridley in 
1934 on November 7, when his team managed to win the 
championship in the dying moments. Eric speaks about 
the wonderful reputation which the Canadians have as 
fighters who cannot be stopped. 



98 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Major Peter Osier ('27-'33), H.Q. 1, Canadian L. of C. 
Terminal, speaks of having visited the Vimy Memorial and 
a number of local French people. His T.C.S. French is being 
brushed up considerably. Peter has seen Ian Waldie ('28- 
'34) with the Queen's Own, and says he has heard that Al 
Staunton was slightly wounded and returned to England; 
he also mentions having seen John Stikeman ('27-'33) and 

Eric Cochran. 

***** 

Bob Wisener ('40-'44) writes from the Naval College 
to say that he and the other T.C.S. cadets are getting along 
satisfactorily. He says John Fisher ('42-'44) stood first 
in Piloting and Navigation, which speaks well for his train- 
ing in military studies at T.C.S. Singing practices in Chapel 
bring back memories of the School. Bob has been playing 
on the first English Rugger team; they play eight games 
with the Royal New Zealand Air Force team and the win- 
ner represents the island in the play-offs for the British 

Columbia championship. 

***** 

John Symons ('38-'43) passed first in his elementary 
flying at St. Eugene and he and David Brooks ('41-'43) 
have now been posted to the Fleet Air Arm stationed at 

Kingston. 

***** 

Colonel B. M. Archibald ('21-'23) is at Headquarters 
of the 8th Indian Division Engineers, C.M.F. He wrote at 
the end of October and says he managed to slide off his 
stool at Headquarters in Algiers and go back to school to 
be re-educated in Engineering up-to-date. He found it 
amazing to see the changes which have taken place in re- 
cent years. He says the Canadian Forces have the name 
of being tough and determined fighters and that they have 
won many hard and costly battles. 

***** 

Lt.-Col. Roger Archibald ('24-'28) is commanding the 
Hth. Canadian Field Regiment in Western Europe. He 
tells us his Regiment is from Montreal and he enjoys his 
work immensely though it has been pretty tough going at 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 99 

times ; they had covered a lot of ground and picked up many 
Germans. Roger had seen Jock Spragge ('18-'24), Geof. 
Boone ('19-'26) and he says one seems to be able to find a 
T.C.S. lad wherever one goes. Lin Russel ('24-'28) is a 
Captain attached to his Regiment. 

***** 

Gordon Jones ('37-'39) wrote on November 10 from 
somewhere in India. He is a Lieutenant in the United 
States Army Air Forces and he was delighted to receive 
the cigarettes the School sent him. Gordon visited us in 
Port Hope in 1941 and since then he has had many thrill- 
ing experiences. In May, 1942, he transferred from the 
R.C.A.F. to the U.S.A.A.F. and got his wings in December. 
He was then posted to the North African theatre of opera- 
tions, flying B-25 Mitchell Bombers. He saw much action 
in Africa and had some exciting times. After the Germans 
had been pushed out, he was sent to Italy, and from there 
to India. 

Gordon was awarded the D.F.C. and Air Medal with 
four oak leaf clusters for his distinguished work as a pilot. 
Our congratulations and best wishes go to him. 

***** 

Philip Banister ('42-'44) writes from the Naval College 
to say that he loves the life but misses T.C.S. ; he never 
seems to have any spare moments nowadays and says that 
the early morning runs at T.C.S. last year would seem a 
lot of fun to him now. He sends his best wishes to every- 
one at the School. 

***** 

Gerald Charrington ('40-'42) wrote in November to 
say that he is now a Trooper in the Royal Armoured Corps. 
His number is 14494333 and his home address is Winch- 
field House, near Basingstoke, Hampshire. He joined the 
Army in August and he has been very busy ever since, but 
he hopes to have some leave in November; two other lads 
from Eton are with him. Gerry says he has heard from 
Owen Harvey ('40-'43) and that Owen hoped to go to Eng- 
land to join the Railway Department of the Royal En- 
gineers. 



100 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Bill McConnell ('34-'39) writes in November from No. 
405 Squadron, R.C.A.F. overseas. He speaks of a leave in 
London where he saw Skip Finley, Craig Somerville ('31- 
'41) and George Renison. Bill hopes to be finished his tour 
of operations in a couple of months and then he is looking 
forward to some leave in Canada. He sends his best wishes 

to the School. 

# * # * * 

Capt. Llewellyn Smith ('32-'37) writes from Holland in 
the middle of November. He had fully recovered from his 
wounds and speaks of advancing over dikes, undulated 
ground, mud and more mud, every position favouring de- 
fence. Sometimes it did not seem humanly possible to keep 
going with fatigue being such a handicap, but the Cana- 
dians always reached their objectives. Llewellyn was en- 
joying a six day rest, the first in over four months. He 
had seen Peter Bell ('24-'27), Gordon Lucas ('34-'36), Mur- 
ray Cassils ('31-'34) and had received letters from Jack 
Langmuir ('35-'40) and Basil Southam. 

***** 

Midshipman David Jellett ('37-'42) writes in Novem- 
ber from H.M.S. Devonshire, c/o G.P.O., London. He 
had enjoyed five days leave in London and had met Dewar 
Laing ('41-'42). Dewar was hoping for leave in Canada 
before long. He also saw Bill Mathers ('40-'42), a Rating 
in the Fleet Air Arm. David had been posted to a course 
with the Fleet Air Arm and had been doing some flying in 
Baracudas and Swordfish. He had visited Don Joy ('37- 
'38), and met Bancroft Svenningson ('38-'42) and Peter 
Landry ('31-'39). On his way over he had seen Bob Morris 
('33-'34), and Tim Cawley ('38-'42) was on the same trans- 
port. 

• • * • • 

Lieut. A. J. K. Jukes ('34-'38) is still on convoy duty, 
but has great hopes of getting leave to come home for 
Christmas after over two and a half years of service on 
the corvette, H.M.S. Woodruff. 



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TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 101 

News has reached us that Lieut. Herbie Langdon's 
('37-'39) Company of the Special Service Force invaded the 
Isle of Levant some six or seven hours ahead of the land- 
ing on the south coast of France. They ran into a bit of 
trouble at one end of the Island, and it was a matter of 
forty-three hours and more before they had succeeded in 
taking the Island and some sixty prisoners. 

***** 

Lieut. Peter Spragge ('28-'31) writes from H.M.C.S. 
Petrolia and says life has been going along quite smoothly 
in his new Ship and that the Admiralty have managed to 
keep them good and busy. He had not seen many Old 
Boys since D-Day, but had seen dozens of them before that 
and had managed to stay with Jock Spragge ('18-'24) for 
a few days. He still runs into the odd "Navy Type" Old 
Boy and had dinner recently with Lieut.-Cmdr. St. Clair 
Balfour ('22-'27), who has just been appointed Senior 
Officer of an Escort Group. He also had seen Lieut. John 
Band ('25-'31) and Lieut.-Cmdr. Tom Brainerd ('28-'31) 
when he was last in London. 



Da\id Carmichael ('40-'43) is now a Coder in the R.N. 
V.R. aboard an Escort Vessel, H.M.S. Wellington, and is 
at sea in a very warm climate. 

« « * « « 

F/O David Ambrose ('29-'33) went to France on D- 
Day plus 1 and is now established with an Air Base some- 
where in Belgium. 

***** 

Pte. P. J. Ambrose ('31-'34) has transferred from 
R.C.A. to infantry and is now at No. 4 C.I.R.U., C.A.O. 

* • • « • 

Capt. A. Perley-Robertson ('34-'37) writes from Bel- 
gium where he is Second in Command of the 38 Battery, 3 
Canadian L.A.A. Regt. Alex has been through the battles 
of Caen. Falaise and Antwerp. 



102 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Lieut. Wally Duggan ('37-'41) writes to say that he 
has not seen many Old Boys lately but had had a long talk 
with Pete Armour ('38-'41) about the good old days at the 
School. He sends his kindest regards to all and best wishes 
for the new school year. 



Lieut. J. L, Grover ('35-'39) writes that he has recently 
seen Bill Vaughan ('31-'34), "Brodie" Duggan ('37-'41), 
Jim Cutten ('28-'37), Harry Hyndman ('35-'37), Ross Le- 
Mesurier ('38-'42). He sends his congratulations to the 
School on winning the Imperial Challenge Shield. 

* * * * # 

Frank Hope ('37-'44) is in the Tank Corps and is now 
stationed at Newmarket, Ontario. 

* * * * * 

0/Sm. E. P. Black ('41-'43) writes from Cornwallis to 
say that he had spent the summer instructing Sea Cadets 
at Three Rivers and was then at Quebec during the Con- 
ference in the Naval Guard for Roosevelt and Churchill 
which was very interesting. He is now continuing his 
officer's course and expects to finish early in February. He 
wishes the School the best of luck. 

m * m * * 

Pte. Johnny Johnson ('40-'43) has left the University 
of New Brunswick where he was taking a Forestry Course 
and is in the infantry as a machine gunner, now stationed 
at Camp Borden. 

* • » * * 

P/0 Jaimie Dodd ('40-'43) is in England and has re- 
cently been taking a short course in Gloucestershire. 

* * * * * 

F/L J. M. Henderson ('33-'36) has left his squadron, 
tour expired, to return to England to instruct for a few 
months. The evening before leaving his squadron Major 
D. J. Corrigall ('23-'24) and F/L Henderson went to Paris 
for a rapid visit where they saw Murray Cassils ('31-'34). 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 103 

F/L H. W. Kingston ('29-'34) has been posted to India. 

* * * * * 

Brigadier G. A. McCarter ('13-'14) returned to Canada 
about the middle of September, after having been in Italy 
for some time, and is now stationed at H.Q. 16 Canadian 
Infantry Brigade, Vernon, B.C. He sends his best wishes 
to everyone at the School and hopes to have an opportunity 

to visit us soon. 

***** 

Hon. Major C. H. Boulden, M.B.E., writes from Eng- 
land to say he has recently seen the following Old Boys: 
Lieut. Robin Reid ('28-'30) since he was wounded in France, 
F/L John Bridger ('23-'28) who is still stationed "up 
North", Hon. Capt. Ted Brain, M.C. ('23-'26), Col. Jim 
Strathy ('19-'22), Brig. W. N. Bostock ('19-'20), Capt. 
Hugh Cayley ('16-'20), Capt. Jack Defries ('23-'26) and 
Capt. George Cruickshank ('12-'16). 

***** 

Capt. David Irwin ('34-'38) writes from Italy on Octo- 
ber 21 and says: "I was walking down Piccadilly just fifteen 
hours after I stepped into a station wagon outside the 
Mount Royal Hotel, Montreal .... I came out here shortly 
after, just in time to be with my unit for the breaking of 
the Gothic Line. We were in the mountains north of 
Florence. It was awful country but luckily not too many 
G^ermans. Quite impossible to have got through had there 
been more of them. At that time they were more worried 
about the Rimini end. Since then I have moved to H.Q. 1 
Canadian Corps where I am G.S.O. 3 (Air). It is a very 
interesting job endeavouring to direct and control the air 
effort in close support of the Corps". 

Tpr. J. D. Butler ('40-'43) writes from England and 
says he was fortunate m seeing Roger Holman ('41-'43) 
on board the transport. John has just completed his train- 
ing as a Wireless Operator (C.A.C.) and is waiting for the 
board to convene in order to qualify with United Kingdom 
qualifications. 



104 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Capt. T. A. Staunton ('27-'31) is now with Headquart- 
ers, 2 Canadian Corps. A. & Q. Branch. He had been with 
his regiment the Q.O.R.C. until just before the Falaise show 
and had had some very exciting moments, but due to an 
eardrum broken from blast had to get a job out of the 
front lines. He says: "It is quite a change from being with 
the regiment in the front line, but comparative peaceful- 
ness and comfort are quite easy to take for awhile". He 
had seen Dal Russell ('26-'34) during the Normandy battle. 
Dave Ambrose ('29-'33) who is in Dal Russel's wing, and 
bumped into Bob Grant ('29-'32) on D-Day shortly after 

they landed. 

***** 

Pte. H. A. Speirs ('37-'43) is stationed at Longue Point, 
Quebec, in the Ordnance Corps, and has high hopes of 

getting overseas. 

***** 

Lieut. J. W. Duncanson ('33-'41) writes from H.M.C.S. 
Tillsonburg to say that he had just received two letters 
from his brother Andy ('26-'32), who is having quite a 
time of it, and is attached to the 4 Bn. Queen's Royal West 
Kent Regiment, South East Asia Command. At the time 
of writing Andy was eighteen miles inside the Jap lines in 
Burma doing a spot of infiltration. At one point of their 
trek they climbed 2,000 feet in a mile, and as a result they 
got some Japs, but unfortunately most of them got away 
in the jungle. They are dependent on supplies from the 
air, and to add to their worries it is Monsoon period and 
everything is very wet. John has recently seen Pete Cay- 
ley ('37-'40). 

***** 

Bdr. Howard Patch ('35-'38) writes from Italy to say 

that he has seen John Layne ('37-'40) who is flourishing 

and also that his brother Lieut. C. M. Patch ('33-'41) is 

probably quite recovered by now, as he was walking by 

August 20. 

• • • * * 

Sergt. BUI Fleming ('39-'42), R.C.A.F.. has been taken 
off the overseas posting list and in place of this was put 
down as an instructor in Canada. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 105 

P/0 BUI Mood ('28-'38) in England has been having 
another long session of training at many different schools, 
but finally arrived at a squadron recently. The only Old 
Boy he has seen was Lieut. Al Ferguson ('27-'35) whom 
he met on the way Overseas. They were in the same cabin 
with 150 other officers; F/0 Dave Greene ('38-'39) was 
with him on the same Navigation course in Scotland. Dave 
topped the course. Congratulations Dave. 

***** 
Lieut. Colin Glassco ('20-'26) writes from Overseas. 
"We have been based on this side for several months now, 
which is an interesting change from our previous run, al- 
though at this stage of the game it is not terribly exciting 
.... One of my peace time anticipations is to visit Port 
Hope again and old associations. I think you should stage 
a special Old Boys' Week-end along the lines of the 75th 
Anniversary, which was such an outstanding success." 

***** 

W/C Dal Russel, D.S.O., D.F.C. & bar ('26-'34) writes 
from an air base in Belgium. He had seen quite a bit of 
Ian Waldie ('28-'34), Al Staunton ('27-'31) and Jock 
Spragge ('18-'24) during the hectic days in Normandy. 
Frank Nobbs ('27-'29) is with him as the Air Liaison Officer. 
Dal expects to be taken off "ops" by the end of the month 
and hopes to be at the School at the beginning of next 
year. We are certainly looking forward to his visit. 

***** 

Sergt. Bob Kovacs ('39-'41) is instructing at an R.C. 

A.F. station. 

***** 

We hear that L.A.C. A. R. McLean ('39-'42) may 
transfer to the Fleet Air Arm. He has been stationed at 
St. John's, Quebec, for the last ten months. 

***** 

Lieut. A. S. Fleming ('30-'38) is in Italy and recently 
spent three days leave in Florence. He has seen Alan 
Magee ('35-'38) and Charlie Seagram ('29-'36). 



106 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Ian Macdonald ('38-'43) has just received his call from 

the Fleet Air Arm. 

***** 

Lieut. J. L. McLennan ('31-'36), the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada, is expected home from Overseas. 

***** 

P/Sub-Lieut. Ken Scott ('40-'43) writes from Corn- 
wallis and tells us that Gay Goodall ('40-'43) is in his class 
and Pat Black ('41-'43) and Pete Wills ('37-'42) are com- 
pleting their New Entry Seaman's training there. He had 
also seen "Knobby" Laing ('42-'44) who has since been 
drafted to a new frigate. While at Ste. Hyacinthe he had 
run into Barry Hayes ('40-'43) and Larry Clarke ('40-'43) 
working very hard on course. 

Cmdr. C. H. Bonnycastle ('20-'21) is New Entry Train- 
ing Officer at Cornwallis. 

***** 

Major Gordon Grant ('20-'22) 2 I/C - 3 Canadian Divi- 
sion Signals writes and says: "Every so often I run into one 
of the old School and hear news of others. Roly Ritchie 
('21-'26) copped one rather badly on D plus 8 or 9, I think 
it v/as. Dudley Dawson ('26-'31) used to be the Intel- 
ligence Officer at Division H.Q., but is now in Canada". He 
sends his best wishes to the School. 

• • • • • 

N.A. 2 Ford Jones' ('36-'44) address is H.M.S. Daeda- 
lus, c/o G.P.O., London, England. 

• • • • • 

John Gilmour ('24-'29) is in the U.S. Merchant Marine 
and has travelled thousands of miles in the Pacific and 
East — some of them "hot spots". 

• • * * # 

As we go to press we hear that Lieut. W. B. Reid ('30- 
'34) is now a prisoner in Germany. He had been reported 
missing in October, and we are thankful that he is safe. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 107 

F/0 A. D. Russel ('29-'30) is stationed at Uplands 
going through his service training flying course. Previous 
to this he was at Abbotsford, B.C., where he completed his 
initial flying training and passed second in his class. 



Sub-Lieut. G. R. Sneath ('41-'42) is serving in the 

H.M.S. Hotspur. 

* * * * # 

Sub-Lieut. Larry Higgins ('37-'42) is on the Corvette 
H.M.C.S. Norsyd and seems to be enjoying the life very 
much. Old Boys he has met include: Tommy Seagram 
('34-'39), Dick Wright ('30-'32), Bob Spence ('38-'42), 
Fred Anderson ('37-'40), John McCaughey ('40-'41), Tim 
Blaiklock ('39-'42). Jim Short ('42-'43) and Sergt. T. A. 
Caldwell (R.C.A.F.) ('38-'42). 

Pte. D. B. Knapp ('37-'40) has passed the Army Air 
Force examinations and came fifth in the West Point 
examinations. He is now an Air Cadet at the University 

of Illinois. 

* * « • * 

Sub-Lieut. Peter Cayley ('37-'40) is now serving in the 
destroyer H.M.C.S. Assiniboine. 

* # * * # 

Lieut. R. H. Smith ('33-'37) is now with the British 
Columbia Regt., and in command of the regimental re- 
connaissance troops. He writes: "In July we came to Nor- 
mandy and have more or less been in the thick of things 
ever since. We were in the battle to close the Falaise poc- 
ket and through those hectic weeks during the long advance 
over the Seine and Somme and into Belgium. Throughout 
this period we have had experiences and seen such things 
as we will never forget. Probably the most impressive of 
all was to witness the destruction of the once proud Ger- 
man Wehrmacht". While Robert was in England he had 
seen George Renison ('33-'38), Lieut. Geof. Scott ('35-'37), 
who later went to Delhi, India, where he commanded an 
M.T.B. Flotilla, WUl Black ('31-'37) "being extremely 



108 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

modest about winning the A.F.C.", and his brother, Lieut 
Howard Smith ('33-'37), who arrived overseas last Decem- 
ber and is now at C.M.H.Q. in London. 

* * * •* * 

Gunner Hughe B. Paterson is with X Troop, R.H.Q., 
11th Survey Regt., R.A., in the British Liberation Army; 
His number is 14437957. Hugh wrote on November 18 
thanking the School for the cigarettes and saying how glad 
he was to be able to take an active part in this war. He 
has seen some French cities which are nothing but heaps 
of rubble but he has fairly decent quarters and is able to 
buy fruit. 

Norman Paterson has been selected for an officers' 
training unit in England; Christopher is at Harrow and 
attained a distinction in the School Certificate Mathematics 
last summer. He is now studying Higher Mathematics and 
is writing the rest of his School Certificate at Christmas 
time. Blair Paterson is at Stowe and seems to enjoy the 
life thoroughly. 

***** 

Capt. T. L. Alexander, M.B.E., who also was reported 
missing in September, is now a prisoner of war in Ger- 
many. 

***** 

Capt. R. D. Grant, of the 10th. Canadian Armoured 
Regiment, writes to thank the School for the "Records" and 
the cigarettes. Bob is with the Liberation Army in Wes- 
tern Europe and received the cigarettes as he was return- 
ing to his Regiment from hospital. 

***** 

Lieut. J. R. Vipond, who was reported missing in Octo- 
ber, has now been reported a prisoner of war at Stalag 7A, 
Mooseburg, Austria. This report was heard on a German 
short wave broadcast. We are relieved to know that Jack 
is safe. 

• • • • • 

Lieut. Walter Reid, previously reported missing, is now 
said to be a prisoner of war in Germany. 



TRINITY COIoLiEGE SCHOOL RECORD 109 

We were all very sorry to hear that Major Campbell 
Osier had been wounded in action in Italy, but the latest 
reports are that he is progressing very favourably and is 
expecting to return to his Regiment without delay. 

* * * # m 

Msm. Peter Heaton is on H.M.S. Puncher and writes, 
in the middle of November, to say that he and his fellow 
officers were having much discussion on the results of the 
Little Big Four. Eight of the former Naval College cadets 
were in his ship and Peter is attached to the flight deck 
party, some of their work being very interesting. 

* * * * * 

Capt. Alan Staunton is with the H.Q., 2nd. Canadian 
Corps, A & Q Branch, and when he wrote at the end of 
October he had been in Belgium for a number of weeks and 
in Europe since D-day. He had experienced a number of 
very exciting moments and because of damage to his eai-- 
drum he had been taken out of the front line. Alan had 
seen Dal Russel, David Ambrose, Bob Grant and Ian Waldie, 
and he says how grateful he is for the cigarettes and 

"Records." 

* * * * * 

Lieut. Colin Patch has now left the hospital and is in a 
Convalescent Home. The cast is off his foot and he is able 
to bear some weight on it. He writes cheerfully and says 

he is feeling very well. 

* * * * * 

Jack Goering called at the School on November 26. 
He joined the Army a few weeks ago and is now in training 
at Orillia. hoping to become a Paratrooper. His address is 
B.167124, Private Goering, J. W. L.. "A" Coy., 1 Platoon, 
No. 26 C.I.C, Basic Training Centre. Orillia. 

iff * * * * 

Lieut. Gordon Best has arrived overseas and is now 
stationed at Aldershot. Considering his very serious ill- 
ness of a year ago, Gordon is certainly to be congratulated 
on recovering sufficiently to be sent overseas. 



110 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

F/0. David Partridge is now Officer Commanding 

Flight "E" at Uplands. 

***** 

Major W. H. (Bill) Broughall is at Headquarters, 2nd. 
Canadian Corps. We understand Bill is doing work of a 
very interesting nature and of great importance. 

***** 

Sq. Ldr. Doug. Cleland is still in England but when he 
last wrote he was expecting to be sent to Burma. 

***** 

F/L. Paul McFarlane is stationed at Yarmouth, N.S. 
Paul has been flying from the east coast for over two and 
a half years, and now has a land job. 

***** 

W/0. 1 J. H. Lawson is stationed in England with the 
Air Force and he recently came second in a Gunnery 
Course, qualifying as Leading Air Gunner. Jamie made an 
average of over 82% and every other Canadian on the 
course was washed out. While he was on this course, 
Jamie's plane, with all its crew, was reported missing. 



OLD BOYS' NOTES— n 

Ian Murray ('38-'43) is at McGill. 

* « * * • 

Rusty Keyes ('39-'44) has been admitted to the Uni- 
versity of Vermont and was to report on October 2. 



William N. Hinds, C.P.A. ('14-'18) has been admitted 
to Partnership in the Firm of Barrow, Wade, Guthrie and 
Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

;*«*•* 

C. F. Gwyn ('21-'27) has been transferred to Baseano 
with the Canadian Pacific Railways where his new work 
will be devoted chiefly to traffic in the Drumheller Coal 
Fields. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD HI 

Guy Russel ('21-'28) has been turned down by both 
the army and air force on medical grounds. We hear he 
is doing a very fine job in the position of General Manager 
of Hugh Russel & Sons Limited, Montreal. 



Jim Southey ('41-'44) and Donald Delahaye ('42-'44) 
both made the Senior Football Team at Queens and play- 
ed extremely well. 

***** 

Jim Paterson ('41-'43) has been forced to leave the 
naval college on medical grounds and has accepted a post 
with the British Overseas Airways Corporation. At pre- 
sent he is stationed in Bermuda, having had experience in 
Baltimore and Nev/foundland. 



John Gray ('41-'44) competed with 101 boys from all 
over England at a Chartered Accountants' examination 
and John led them all, winning a bursary. One of the top 
officers in the Chartered Accountants' Association remark- 
ed that John's success spoke highly of Canadian teaching. 

« * * « * 

Charles Campbell ('37-'43) has tried to enlist in the 
Air Force and the Navy but he has been told he must con- 
tinue his Science studies at the University of Manitoba. We 
hear that Charles made quite a name for himself as a soloist 
at Camp Ahmek last summer. 

***** 

Michael Reford ('40-'42) is a school Prefect this year 
at Wellington, and also head of his House. In December 
he is writing for a Mathematics Scholarship to New Col- 
lege, Oxford, and we wish him the best of luck. Last term 
he wrote Group m of the Oxford and Cambridge Higher 
Certificate examinations and passed all the papers with ex- 
cellent standing. Michael is now a member of the Fleet 
Air Arm and he hopes to be called up for Active Service in 
January. He is head of the Wellington College Air Train- 
ing Corps, holding the rank of Flight Sergeant, and he says 
he finds his T.C.S. Cadet Corps training very useful to him. 



112 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

At his camp last summer in Wiltshire he was given a lot 
of flying, and he has also been attending a local gliding 
school where he has obtained his "A" license. He says he 
finds the "Record" very interesting and he sends his best 

wishes to the School. 

« « * « » 

Chris Bovey ('41-'44) is studying Chemical Engineer- 
ing at McGill and has joined the Zeta Psi fraternity. He 
finds he has little spare time as the work is heavy, but he 
hopes to visit the School in the spring. 



BIRTHS 

Leather — At Bramshot Military Hospital, Hampshire, Eng- 
land, November 25, 1944, the wife of Captain Hartley 
Leather, R.C.A., a daughter. 



MARRIAGES 



Cayley— Noble— On July 1, 1944, at St. Mark's Church. 
Mensfield, Nottinghamshire, England, Lieutenant Edward 
Cartwright Cayley ('33-'39), R.C.N.V.R., to Wren Mar- 
garet Noble. 

Peacock — Horsfield — On November 22, 1944, at the Church 
of St. Michael. Oxford, England. Flight-Sergeant Edward 
Francis Peacock ('36-'40), R.C.A.F., to Miss Patricia 
Margaret Horsfield. 



DEATHS 

Black— On June 27, 1944, Flight Lieutenant William A. 
Black, A.F.C. ('31-'37), R.C.A.F., previously reported 
missing, now presumed killed in action. 

Ferguson — On October 8, 1944, in Italy, Lieutenant Alastair 
McDowell Ferguson ('27-'35), Royal Regiment of Canada. 
Killed in Action. 



114 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Johnston— On September 29, 1944, in Belgium, Lieutenant 
Malcolm G. Johnston ('30-'37), the Black Watch (R.H. 
R.) of Canada, Killed in Action. 

Pringle — On Monday, November 27, at Toronto, Robert 
Hatfleld Pringle {'03-'04). He was at the School from 
1903-04 and after leaving, became engaged in the in- 
surance and brokerage business in Ottawa; coming to 
Toronto in 1928 he established his own firm. Mr. Pringle 
was a veteran of the first Great War; he was very active 
in the Bayview Riding and Driving Association and in 
the Toronto Horse Show Association, having won many 
prizes with horses from his own stable. He was a mem- 
ber of the Masonic Order, the Granite Club and the 
Church of England. Surviving are his widow and brother, 
J. F. Pringle. 

Reid— On February 25, 1943, Pilot Officer Robert Maxwell 
Reid ('34-'37), R.C.A.F., previously reported missing, 
now presumed killed in action. 



Corporation of 
Trinity College School 

VISITOR: 
His Grace the Archbishop of Toronto and Primate of All Canada. 

GOVERNING BODY 
Ex-Officio Members 

The Chancellor of Trinity Universitv. 

The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College. 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., B.Paed., Headmaster. 

Elected Members 

The Hon. Mr. Justice R. M. Dennistoun, C.B.E., V.D., B.A., LL.D Winnipeg 

Robert P. Jellett, Esq Montreal 

G. B. Strathy, Esq., K.C., M.A Toronto 

Norman Seagram, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. Senator G. H. Barnard, K.C Viaoria, B.C. 

CoL J. W. Langmuir, M.B.E., V.D Toronto 

Capt. Cohn M. Russell Montreal 

J. H. Lithgow, Esq Toronto 

A. E. Juices, Esq Vancouver, B.C. 

Col. H. C. Osborne, C.M.G., C.B.E., V.D., M.A Ottawa 

Hugh F. Labatt, Esq London, Ont. 

F. G. Mathers, Esq., B.A., LL.B Winnipeg 

Major B. M. Osier Toronto 

J. Bruce Mackinnon, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. R. C. Matthews, P.C, B.A Toronto 

Wing Commander Charles Bums Toronto 

The Right Rev. R. J. Renison, M.A., D.D Iroquois Falls, Ont. 

Admiral Percy W. Nelles, C.B., R.C.N Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. J. Ewart Osborne, D.S.O., V.D., B.Sc Toronto 

Air Marshal W. A. Bishop, V.C, C.B., D.S.O., M.C., D.F.C., LL.D Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. Gerald W. Birks, O.B.E Montreal 

J. D. Johnson, Esq Montreal 

Major W. M. Pearce, M.C Toronto 

G. Meredith Huycke, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

S. S. DuMoulin, Esq Hamilton 

Argue Martin, Esq., K.C Hamilton 

T. W. Seagram, Esq Waterloo, On:. 

Gerald Larkin, Esq Toronto 

R. V. LeSueur, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

Wilder G. Penfield, C.M.G., M.D., D.S.C, D.C.L., F.R.S., F.R.C.S.,. .. .Montreal 
Captain Strachan Ince, D.S.C Toronto 

Appointed by Trinity College 
The Hon. Mr. Justice P. H. Gordon, C.B.E., K.C, M.A., LL.D., B.CL. 

Elected by the Old Boys 

P A. DuMoulin, Esq London, Ont. 

Capt. P. G. Campbell, M.C Toronto 

Major H. L. Symons, E.D Toronto 



Trinity College School. Port Hope, Ont. 

FXJUNDED 1865 

Head Master 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambndge; B.A., Trinity 

College, Toronto; B.Paed., Toronto. St. Mark's School, Southborough, 

Mass., 1929-1933. (1933) 

House Masters 
C. ScoiT, Esq., London University. (Formerly Headmaster of Kmg's College 

School, Windsor). (1934) 
R. G. S. Maibr, Esq., B.A., Harvard; University of Paris; Cornell University. (1936) 

Chaplain 
The Rev. E. R. Bagley, M.A., St. Peter's Hall, Oxford; Ridley Hall, Cambridge. 
(1944). 

Assistant Masters 

Col. H. V. de Bury, C.B.E., Royal Military College, Kingston, 1905-10; Sconey- 

hurst College, England. (1943) 

F. P. Gregoris, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; University of London; University 

of Rome; B.Ph.; Ph.L. (1943) 

G. R. GwYNNE-TiMOTHY, EsQ., B.A., Jesus College, Oxford. (1944). 

G. A. Hill, Esq., B.A., LJniviTsity College. Toronto; Ontario College of Education. 

(1942) 
A. B. HoDGETis, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto; University of Wisconsin. 

(1942) 
A. B. Key, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; Ontario College of Education. (1943) 
P. H. Lewis, Esq., M.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. (1922) 
W. K. MoLSON, Esq., B.A., McGiU University. (Jan. 1942) 
A. C. Morris, Esq., B.A., Kings College, Windsor, N.S. (1921) 
A. H. N. Snelgrove, Esq., Mount Allison University. (1942) 
R. Thompson, Esq., M.A., St. Catherine's College, Cambridge; Santander. (1942) 
A E. White, Esq., M.A., McMaster University. (Jan. 1945). 

Tutor 
LiBUT.-CoL. K. L. Stevenson, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. (1930) 

Visiting Masters 

Edmund Cohu. Esq Mtuic 

S J. DoLiN, Esq., Mus. Bac Mu«c 

Physical Instructor for both Schools 
LiBUT. S. J. BAPr, Royal Fusiliers; formerly Physical Instructor at R.M.C, 
Kingston, Ontario. (1921) 

THE JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Principal 

C. J. Tottenham. Esq., B.A., Queen's University, Kingston. (1937) 

Assistant Masters 
H. G. James, Esq., Leeds University. (1922). 

J. D. Burns, Esq., University of Toronto, Normal School, Toronto. (1943). 
Mrs. Cecil Moore, Normal School, Peterborough. (1942). 

D. W. Morris, Esq., Normal School, London. (1944). 

H. C. Swallow, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto. (1944). 



Bursar G. C. Teniple, Esq. 

Physician F. W. Diamond, Esq., M.D. 

Nurse Miss Rhea Pick, R.N. 

Dietitian Mrs. J. F. Wilkin 

Matron (Senior School ) Mrs. G. R. Gwynne-Timotfay 

Nurse-Matron (Junior School) Mrs. G. Sturgeon, R-N. 

Dietitian (Junior School) Mrs. D. M. Crowe 

Secretary Miss E. M. Gregory 



SCHOOL DIRECTORY 

PREFECTS 
E. J. M. Huycke (Head Prefect), P. C. Dobell, H. C. D. Cox, J. M. Irwin, 

E. Howard. 

SENIORS 

H. Ft«nch, E. McC. Sinclair, J. R. deC. Warner, T. McC. Wade, J. R. McMurrich, 

H. C. Butterfield, G. P. Vernon, P. H. Mclntyre, G. A. H. Pearson, 

D. A. Davidson, G. C. Bovaird, J. N. Matthews. 

HOUSE OFFICERS 

J. K. P. Allen, W. G. Phippen, J. G. Greig, D. A. Decker, J. B. Auadn, 

D. H. Wilson, P. L. Gilbert, V. Dawson, R. V. S. Smith, W. G. McDougall, 

D. H. Roenisch, R. A. Hope, R. C. Paterson, R. M. Kirkpatrick, 

P. C. Stratford, F. A. H. Greenwood, J. G. Gibson, S. C. EdmotKls, 

D. S. Hare, P. A. Richardson, G. N. M. Currie, E. E. Gibson, 

W. C. Long, G. L. Robarts. 

SCHOOL COUNCIL 
The Headmaster, 3 Prefects 
VI Scholarship — Pearson i (French i) VC — Gillan (Hardaker) 

VIA— Vernon (Sinclair) IVA (1)— French ii (McDowell) 

VIB— Howard (Hope) IVA (2)— McPherson (Jarvis) 

VA — Greenwood (McDougall) IVB — Fennell (Wismer) 

VB— O'Grady (Crowe) IIIA— Hall (Rogers) 

IIIB— Spencer (Pilcher) 
CHAPEL 
Head Sacristan — D. S. Hare. 
Sacristans 
I. B. Campbell, W. A. Curtis, V. Dawson, J. G. Gordon, H. A. Hyde, 
W, G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, R. W. S. Robertson, D. H. Roenisch, 
C. J. Scott, T. McC. Wade, R. L. Watts. 

HOCKEY BASKETBALL 

Captain — E. J. M. Huycke. Captain — H. French. 

Vice-Captain— P. C. Dobell. Vice-Captain— W. A, Toole. 

GYM. SQUASH 

Captain — D. M. O'Grady. Captain — E. Howard. 

Vice-Captain — J. G. Gibson. 

THE LIBRARY 

Librarian — G. D. White; Assistant — H. A. Lamb 

Carnegie Room — J. L. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle 

Used Book Room — I. B. Campbell, C. J. Scott 

Lights Boys — H. P. Goodbody, P. L. Goering, R. M. Merry 



Trinity College School Record 



VOL. 48, NO. 3. FEBRUARY, 1945. 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Active Servic' List 

Editorials 1 

In Memonam- — 

F. G. McLaren , 8 

T. Rov Jones 9 

Chapel Notes — 

The Carol Service 12 

School Notes — 

The Provost 23 

Admiral Nelles 24 

Miss Smith 25 

Staff Changes 27 

The Conservatory Junior Trio 28 

The Football Dinner 28 

Christmas Dinner and Entertainment 29 

The New Chapel 33 

News in Hall 34 

Aw ards for Valour and Distinguished Service 35 

School Debates 39 

Letter to the Editor 41 

Brief Biography 42 

Contributions — 

Music m Nature 43 

Refleaion 45 

The Influence of Wars 45 

Attack in the Night 47 

Mens Sana 48 

A Snow Storm 50 

Television 51 

"D" Day 55 

Off the Record- 
Could You Imagine? 58 

'i'ou Cant Afford to Miss This 59 

Doting Relations 60 

Hockey 62 

Basketball 69 

New Boys' Boxing Competition 72 

New Boys' Gym. Competition 73 

The Magee Cup '4 

The Junior School Record 76 

Old Boys' Notes— 

On Active Service 83 

Old Boys' Notes II 97 

Births. Marriages, Deaths '0' 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Lent Term, 1945 

Jan. 10 Term begins. 

14 Chaplain and Hon. Wing Cmdr. Bruce Jennings 
speaks in Chapel. 

20 Basketball vs. Peterborough, at Peterborough. 

23 T.C.S. vs. Port Hope, at Port Hope. 

24 Basketball vs. Port Hope, at Port Hope. 

26 T.C.S. vs. Cobourg, at Cobourg. 

30 T.C.S. vs. Bowmanville, at Port Hope. 

31 Basketball vs. Cobourg, at Port Hope. 

Feb 2 T.C.S. vs. Port Hope, at Port Hope. 

6 Mr. Dickson-Kenwin gives Dramatic Recital in 

HaU. 
T.C.S. vs. Cobourg, at Port Hope. 

7 Basketball vs. Bowmanville, at Port Hope. 
9 T.C.S. vs. Lakefield, at Port Hope. 

Basketball vs. Peterborough, at Port Hope. 

13 Shrove Tuesday. Annual Pancake Toss. 
T.C.S. vs. Port Hope, at Port Hope. 

14 Ash Wednesday. 

Basketball vs. Cobourg, at Cobourg. 

15 Basketball vs. Trenton, at Port Hope. 
17 Fourth Month's Marks. 

T.C.S. vs. U.C.C, at Oshawa. 

21 Basketball vs. Port Hope, at Port Hope. 
T.C.S. vs. Pickering, at Toronto. 

27 Mr. W. J. Davidson speaks in Hall. 

28 T.C.S. vs. Ridley, at Varsity Arena, Toronto. 

Mar. 3 Little Big-Four Squash Meet, at Toronto. 
12-17 Imperial Challenge Shield. 
14-16 Gym. Competitions. 

17 Little Big-Four Swimming Meet, at Hart House, 
Toronto. 
19-24 Boxing Competition. 
24 Confirmation Service. 
28 Fifth Month's Marks. 
Easter Holidays begin. 

Apr. 9 School Dance. 

11 Trinity Term begins. 



Prayer in Use in +he Chapel for Old Boys 
on Active Service 

O Almighty God, who art wiser than the 
children of men and overrulest all things to their 
good, hold, we beseech Thee, in Thy keeping all 
who have gone forth to battle for our cause, 
especially those from this School: watch over 
those that are missing: comfort and protect those 
in the hands of the enemy. Be with them in the 
hour of danger, strengthen them in the hour of 
weakness, sustain and comfort them in the hour 
of sickness or of death. Grant that they may be 
true to their calling and true always to Thee, 
and make both them and its to be strong to do our 
duty in Thy service, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. 

ACTIVE SERVICE LIST 

Additions, Promotions and Corrections, February, 1945 

1937-40 ANDERSON, F. S., A.B.. R.C.N.V.R. 

1925-34 ANNESLEY, J. C. L., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 

1921-23 ARCHIBALD. B. M., O.B.E., Brigadier. R.E. 

1930-33 BAILLIE. J. F., Capt.. the Black Watch (R.H. 
R.) of Canada. 

1925-31 BAND. J. T., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1941-44 BANNISTER. K., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1938-42 BARNETT. J. W., L.A.C.. R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 BEARDSHAW. R. F.. S.P.O., R.C.N. 

1937-44 BEAMENT, J. A.. Pte.. C.A.T.C. 

1939-42 BLAIKLOCK, D. M.. A.B.. R.C.N. 

1919-26 BOONE. G. L.. M.B.E.. E.D.. Major, 48th. 
Highlanders of Canada. 

1929-33 BRADEN. W. G., Major. R.C.E.M.E. 

1927-32 BROUGHALL. W. H., M.B.E., Major, R.H.L.I. 

1929-33 BRUNTON. Sir E. F. L., Capt, R.C.A.M.C. 

1912-14 BULL. R. O., M.C.. Colonel. V.G. of C. (Re- 
tired). 

1935-38 CARTWRIGHT, J. R. C. A/Sergt.. R.C.A. 



1916-21 CASSELS, R. F., Sergt.-Instructor, R.C.A.F. 
(Demobilized). 

1939-41 CHEYNEY, B. J. K., Sub-Lieut, R.N.F.A.A. 

1940-42 CHIPMAN, W. N. A, Pte, No. 3 C.I.T.R. 

1926-30 COULSON, J. F., Cpl., 48th. Highlanders of 
Canada. 

1921-27 CROLL, I. B., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing). 

1926-28 CURRELLY, J. C. N., Capt., 48th. Highlanders 
of Canada. 

1928-37 CUTTEN, J. E., Capt., R.C.A. 

1941-44 DAY, R. E., Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. 

1938-42 DIGNAM, D. S., Cadet Officer, Can. Merchant 
Navy. 

1923-24 DILLANE, R. G., F/L. R.C.A.F. 

1918-25 EVANS, J. L., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1920-23 GAISFORD, G., D.S.O., Lieut.-Coi., R.A.C. 

1923-28 GARDINER, O. E. S., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1911-13 GILL, N. G., Capt., Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1942-43 GORDON, E. C, A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1938-39 HANNA, J. E., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1940-42 HARE, M., 

1926-30 HARRINGTON, C. F., Major, R.C.A. 

1936-41 HART, J. O., 2nd Lieut., U.S.M.A.C.R. 

1936-38 HART, M. C, L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1929-30 HATCH, C, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1931-35 HOWLAND, V. W., A/Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., 
R.C.N. 

1942-44 HUNGERFORD, T. E., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1926-31 IRWIN, H. E.,Major, Armoured Corps. 

1926-30 JEMMETT, D. E. fp., O.B.E., A/Cmdr., R.C.N. 
V.R. 

1929-31 JOHNSON, L. G., Major, R.C.A.M.C. 

1929-35 KEEFER, E. C, Surg.-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. (De- 
mobilized) . 

1929-36 KEEFER, R. G., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1939-40 KEEGAN, D. M., L.N.A., R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1928-31 KING, T. B., Capt., Kent Regt. (M.G.) (Pri- 
soner of War). 



1941-42 LAING, G. D., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1931-39 LANDY. P. C, Cpl.. R.C.A.F. 

1935-40 LANGMUIR, J. VV. C., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1925-30 LASH, Z. R. B., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-31 LAW, D. A., Capt., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) 
of Canada. 

1926-30 LAW, J. F., Lieut.-Col., Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1936-39 LAWSON, J. H., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1920-22 LAZIER, J. E., Lieut. 

1939-43 MACDONALD, I. R., N.A.2. R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.) 

1937-41 MacKINNON, P. B. L., L/Cpl., R.C.O.C. 

1940-42 MATHERS. W. G., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.) 

1902-07 MATHEWSON, F. S., D.S.O., Lieut.-Col.. the 
Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada (Re- 
tired ) . 

1935-38 McCULLOUGH, J. C, P/O, R.C.A.F. 

1931-36 McFARLANE, P. A., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
tl928-37 McLAREN. F. G., Major, 48th. Highlanders of 
Canada. (Killed in Action). 

1917-19 MERRY. R. E., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-32 MICKLE. W. J., , British Army. 

1942-44 MILLHOLLAND, A. S., A/S, U.S.N.R. 

1909-10 MONTGOMERY, D. G.. Capt., V.G. of C. 

1920-27 MUSSEN. P. V.. F/L. R.C.A.F. 

1939-41 MOYSEY. R. D., P/0. R.C.A.F. 

1907-08 NELLES, P. W., C.B., Admiral, R.C.N. (Re- 
tired). 

1929-33 NEWMAN, H. J. R.. Capt., Royal Regt. of 
Canada. 

1930-33 O'BRIEN. H. J. S.. F/0. R.C.A.F. (Missing). 

1916-23 OSLER. G. S., Capt.. 48th Highlanders of Can- 
ada. ( Demobilized ) . 

1938-44 PARKER, E. M., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1939-43 PATERSON. N. R., Officer Cadet, R.C.S. 

1933-35 PENFIELD, W. G., Capt., W/Intell., Can. 
Army. 

1921-25 PHIPPS. N. E., Major. R.C.A. 

1933-36 RAWLINSON. G. L., M.C.. Lieut., Armoured 
Corps. 



1940-42 REFORD, M. S., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1927-33 REED, L. M., Capt., H.Q.. 3rd. Div. 

Master SCHAEFER, C, F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1907-10 SHEPHERD, O. G., Lieut.-Col., Canadian Den- 
tal Corps. 

1933-37 SMITH, R. H.. Capt., British Columbia Regt. 

1938-44 STEWART, I. C, N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1934-36 STORMS, P. H., Lieut., R.C.E. 

1940-42 SULLY, B. A. B., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1917-23 SUMMERHAYES, D. T., F/L, R.A.F.V.R. 

1923-29 USBORNE, T. H., Flt.-Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1930-34 VAUGHAN, R. P., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1931-33 WHITE, W. L. C, Lieut., Regina Rifles of Can. 

1928-32 WORTHINGTON, J. M. W., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1919-26 WOTHERSPOON, G. D., D.S.O., E.D., Lieut.- 
Col., Armoured Corps. 

1925-31 WOTHERSPOON, R. B., Major, R.E. 



(3(ti ^etmirtam 



KiUed in Action 

Frederick George McLaren (T.C.S. 1928-37) 
Major, 48th. Highlanders of Canada. 



"Yet can I not persuade me thou art dead, 
Oh no! for something in thy face did shine 
Above mortality that showed thou wast divine. 



?R- ^- V- 



Trinity College School Record 

Vol. 48 Trinity College School, Port Hope, February, 1945 No. 3 

Editor-in-Chief P. C. Dobell 

News Editor S. C. Edmonds 

Literary Editor G. P. Vemon 

Sports Editor E. McC. Sinclair 

Feature Editor T. McC. Wade 

Business Manager R. C. Paterson 

Assistants H. French, J. B. French, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, 

A. M. Stewart, H. C. Butterfield, J. H. Caldbick, H. C. D. Cox, 
V. Dawson, W. M. Dobell, J. W. Dobson, F. A. H. Greenwood, 
J. G. Gordon, J. M. Hailward, D. S. Hare, T. Huxley, R. M. Kirk- 
patrick, T. W. Lawson, J. R. Ligertwood, J. D. McDonough, M. F. 
McDowell, P. H. Mclntyre, W. H. Palmer, G, A. H. Pearson, 
R. W. S. Robertson, R. V. S. Smith, J. R. deC. Warner, R. L. Watts. 

Photography G. C. Bovaird, R. P. Stokes 

Junior School Record Mr. C. J. Tottenham 

Managing Editor Mr. W. K. Molson 

Treasurer Mr. A. H. N. Snelgrove 



The Record is published six times a year, in the months of October, December, 
February, April, June and August. 



EDITORIALS 

Do we learn to work at school? Surely this vital 
question has disturbed the minds, at one time or other, of 
most of the boys at T.C.S. If this were the ideal place 
to work, such a doubt would never arise in anyone's 
mind. But the very fact that it often does, proves that 
this is not always the case. The subject then resolves it- 
self into a discussion as to whether it is more difficult to 
study in a boarding school such as our own, or in the high 
school of a town or city. 

Let us first decide on the academic purpose of a 
school. Should we simply memorize a string of facts, 
which may or may not be coherent, or ought we to learn 
how to concentrate and to study? Certainly the latter 



2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

course is the wiser and more intelligent one, since the 
actual facts we learn at school are usually of little value 
in our professional lives. It is the knowledge of how to 
study that enables us to absorb the necessary information 
that is brought to our attention in university and in later 
life. And yet how many of us actually realize that this 
is the fundamental objective of all schools? 

There is at T.C.S. no one all-embracing system of 
studying upon which to base our comparisons, for there 
are various arrangements under which a boy may be work- 
ing. He may, for example, either work in a supervised 
study or in his own room; he may have only a very few 
"spares" as compared with a larger number available to 
older boys; he may find he has little spare time while 
others, not so athletically inclined, may have considerably 
more time. All these different circumstances must enter 
into our discussion in order to make it at all comprehensive. 

Proceeding to actual comparisons, let us deal first 
with the problem of spare time as it exists in high schools 
and here at T.C.S. Even the most casual glance convinces 
us that the presence of motion picture theatres, bowling 
aDeys and other similar distractions are a very disturbing 
influence on most students. In the country, however, we 
are certainly well protected from these diversions of the 
city. But wait! Are there not a number of distractions 
at "School in the form of ever-present games and "bull 
sessions"? These hindrances to additional study are, we 
must agree, for the most part due to the large numbers 
of boys living in such close quarters, as it is always pos- 
sible to find someone to do something with. Admittedly 
playing games is more healthy than spending the afternoon 
in the movies, yet boys may, if they are not careful, lay too 
much emphasis on sport rather than on their studies. We 
are fortunate that this danger is recognized and that 
encouragement is continually given us to work by those 
charged with our guidance. High school boys are not 
menaced by this particular pitfall to such an extent, since 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 3 

it requires considerable effort on the part of any person 
to reassemble a group of boys after they have returned 
home in the evening. Once out of school, high school 
students are at liberty to do as they please, without the 
necessary supervision of masters to direct and aid them 
in their studies. 

There is no doubt that supervised study, if properly 
controlled, is one method of being certain that boys do 
their work, although the large number of students gather- 
ed together in one room, some of whom have no desire to 
work, may make it difficult for a few of the boys concern- 
ed to concentrate fully. A different situation exists with 
those who, either due to their age, seniority, or academic 
standing, are permitted to study in their rooms imder a 
minimum of supervision. This system is a very wise one 
since, if boys learn to organize and train themselves to 
work, they are actually preparing themselves for imiver- 
sity and the future. If more of us realized this fact, we 
could certainly benefit from it. For, although some readily 
adapt themselves to this situation, others do not. And it 
is these others, who, not working themselves, selfishly 
disturb those who are, and all suffer. 

The same problem exists in high schools, with two 
exceptions. First, if a boy does not v/ant to work in the 
house, he cannot disturb his friends and he alone suffers. 
And second, unless parents are very strict and supervise 
their children's work carefully, (which does not seem to 
be the usual practice) , many boys will find the temptations 
of doing something other than the work on hand too dif- 
ficult to resist, and nothing will be accomplished. Of these 
two, the disadvantages of the second seem to far outweigh 
the advantages of the first, for although the high school 
may be suited to the occasional untempted and studious in- 
dividual, in general boys will do more work under the 
supervision of the masters in a boarding school. 

We might now consider that the foregoing leads us 
to a reasonably general, but sketchy conclusion regarding 



4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

the comparative merits of studying at home or in school. 
One or two observations remain to be brought out. In our 
conclusion we remarked that the untempted but studious 
individual may find the quiet of the home more to his 
liking. A similar student in a boarding school, however, 
would have the advantage of masters on hand, eager to 
help, and readily accessible references. In fact, the pre- 
sence of masters is an advantage to all students for they 
are trained to teach boys how to organize themselves and 
their stufiies and to aid them in preparing for the future. 
As a result of all this discussion, there is but one con- 
clusion that we can safely arrive at. It is that any boy 
who makes an honest and sincere attempt to improve him- 
self can learn how to study in either type of institution 
with almost equal facility, although individuals may be 
suited either to one or the other due to particular condi- 
tions and preferences peculiar to each person. In other 
words, it depends upon the boy and his determination to 
work, rather than upon the surroundings he may happen 
to work in. 

— P.C.D. 



"There is no end to education . . . We might as well 
try to get in our 'teens the minimum of righteousness that 
will admit us to heaven and consider that we are then 
'finished' with religion. Education is initiation, not appren- 
ticeship. It has nothing to do with trade, business or liveli- 
hood; it has no connection with rate of wages or increase 
of pay. Its scale is not the material scale of the market. 
Education is a preparation for life, not merely for a liveli- 
hood, for living not for a living. Its aim is to make men 
and women, not 'hands'." 

— G€orge Sampson. 



TRiNrry college school record 5 

The Heart of Christianitj- 

Extracts from the last broadcast talk given by the late 
William Temple, Archbishop of Canterbury. 

(From the Canadian Churchiaaji) 

There is only one person among the multitudes of 
men and women of this and all past ages whose birthday 
is celebrated by some people at least in every nation on 
earth; that person is Jesus Christ, whom most of those 
who keep His birthday call "Our Lord." 

We dare not claim without more ado that we are fight- 
ing in the cause of Christ, for we do not know that our 
discipleship is so complete that we can use victory in His 
service. But we can and we must affirm that we are 
fighting against His enemies. The thing we are fighting is 
a revival in a peculiarly hideous and most mighty form 
of the thing He came to supersede. Mankind needs a 
Leader to guide it through the tangle of life; mankind 
needs a Saviour to deliver it from the evils of life. Where 
are we to find our Leader and Saviour? Germany, with 
the exception of its better and wiser folk, believed that 
Hitler could lead and deliver first Germany and then man- 
kind. To us this seems so ridiculous that many cannot 
take it seriously; they see that there is a tyranny to be 
destroyed, but they cannot see that there is an idolatry to 
be torn out of men's minds; and it is vital that we all 
should see this. 

It is not a new thing, this idolatry; it is very old. 

We are all determined to overthrow Hitler's tyranny; 
that can be done by force of arms, and we mean to do it. 
Beyond that is the greater need, to root out from men's 
minds the Nazi idolatry, and that cannot be done by force 
of arms. The causes that produce it are in the souls and 
circumstances of men. Those causes produced that idola- 
try in other ancient empires, and then in that of Rome. 
They produced it in modem Gennany. No doubt there 



6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

was a long tradition in German history and much of its 
hterature which prepared the way. But that history had 
its sympathizers and that literature its admirers in other 
countries, including our own. No Christian who under- 
stood his own faith could share that sympathy or feel 
that admiration; but they were there. And the causes 
will all be at work again when the war is over. 

It is not enough to destroy the tyranny of darkness; 
we must become carriers of that light which is ready to 
guide our feet into the way of peace. 

We must not be content to throw back the aggression 
of darkness; we must so fully enrol ourselves as soldiers 
of the light that through us its empire may spread over 
the world and darkness may not again prevail against it. 
Our enlistment in that service must be for life; there is 
no demobilization ; but the service is freedom because it is 
the fulfilment of our true bemg, and our Leader is the 
Love that came down at Christmas, the Love that is the 
Light of the World. 

So we come to the heart of the Christian message 
and the well-spring of Christian hope; as St. John puts it: 
"Herein is love, not that we loved God but that He loved 
us." If the Gospel merely set before us the life of Christ 
as the perfection of human living, and then told us to live 
like that, it would be our despair. You might just as well 
present me with a copy of "Hamlet" or "King Lear" and 
tell me to sit down and write plays like that. Shakespeare 
could do it; I can't; that is the difference between him and 
me. So. too, with that life of perfect love, it is only a 
human life. Christ could live like that; I can't; that is 
the difference between Him and me. But the GJospel is 
not first a call to live by love with an example of how to 
do it. It is first and foremost the proclamation that God 
Himself so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten 
Son — One in whom we see the character of the divine 
Father reproduced, so that He could say, "He that hath 
seen Me hath seen the Father." 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 7 

So Christianity is not first and foremost concerned 
with what men should be and do; it is first and foremost 
a proclamation of what God is and has done. That is 
why its message is a well-spring of hope; for it tells of the 
coming into the v/orld of a new power. If my trust is 
not in what I can do, but in what He has done and still 
can do, then I have hope. 

From this follows the nature of a Christian's disci- 
pline. Of course, he must watch his special bad tendencies, 
and see that they do not lead him into bad conduct. Any 
one can do that; and every one ought to do it, Christians 
with the rest. But that is not yet the beginning of a 
distinctively Christian life. For strength to live that life 
the Christian has the resolute determination to begin 
every day in the company of Christ and so far as may be 
live in that company, by remembrance of Him and by 
prayer to Him. 

The Christian hopes to improve, and to become the 
means of making the world a better place, by putting him- 
self under the play of the influence of Christ, of the pure 
and holy love of God displayed in Christ, and let Christ 
by His Spirit do the rest. 



VALETE 

Bannister, K. — Form VIB; House Officer; Middleside 

Soccer. 
Beattie, J. D.— Form VIB. 
Bowles, R. P.— Form VB ; Middleside Xn. 
Ingham, P. T. — Form DIA; Half Soccer; Littleside XI. 
Lucas i, R. F.— Form IVB; Littleside Vm. 
Lucas ii, S. T.— Form IVB. 
MacDowell ii, T. H.— Form IVA (2). 
White ii, P. A.— Form ITLA. 
Wilson ii, F. W.— Form VB; Littleside XH. 



8 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

IN MEMORIAM 

(From His Grace, the Primate's Christmas letter) 

"We know that where there is courage and sacrifice 
there is also the pledge of a better day and a fuller life. 
What courage and sacrifice have been shown through the 
days of 1944, and through all the years of the war! If 
those who have made the supreme sacrifice could speak I 
think they would say something like this: 

"Ye that have faith to look with fearless eyes 

Beyond the anguish of a world at strife, 
And know that out of death and night shall rise 

The dawn of ampler life; 
Rejoice, whatever anguish rend the heart. 

That God has given you the priceless dower 
To live in these great times and have your part 

In Freedom's crowning hour, 
That ye may tell your sons who see the light 

High in the heavens — their heritage to take — 
'I saw the powers of darkness take their flight: 

I saw the morning break'." 

— (Found on the body of an Australian soldier). 



F. G. McLaren 

Major, 48th. Highlanders 

Fred McLaren entered the Junior School in 1928 and 
spent nine years with us. leaving in June, 1937. He work- 
ed his way steadily up the School, won third team colours 
in football and cricket and was a member of the second 
gym. eight. In his final year, Fred passed his Honour 
Matriculation in good standing in the Sixth Form, and in 
recognition of his position in the School he was appointed 
a Prefect in the summer term. Fred, or "Sheckle" as he 
was popularly known, was always a happy and reliable 
boy, and made a host of friends while here. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 

At R.M.C. Fred was a Quartermaster Sergeant and 
then interrupted his course in 1939 to go overseas with the 
48th. Highlanders. In 1940 he went to France. Later, en 
route to Sicily, he lost his kit for the second time when his 
ship, which carried ammunition, was torpedoed and blew 
up. In September, 1943, Fred commanded Headquarters 
Company in the 48th., and was wounded in Italy. Last 
December, a shell burst near him, badly injuring his leg 
and he died on December 5. 

There was never any fanfare or self-seeking about 
Fred. His life was an outstanding example of steady per- 
severance and constant good humour. He has given his 
best — the greatest satisfaction he would have asked for. 

Three sisters have been serving overseas, one of whom 
died on active service a few months ago. Fred was married 
in England in 1942 and leaves a year old son. We send 
our deep sympathy to his widow, to his parents, Lieut.-Col. 
and Mrs. George H. McLaren, Todmorden, Ontario, and to 
his sisters. 



T. ROY JONES 



The sudden death of Mr. Thomas Roy Jones on Satur- 
day, January 6, means the loss to the School of a great 
friend. 

Mr. Jones was elected to the Governing Body in April, 
1941, and always mamtained the keenest interest in our 
activities. At School matches. Chapel services, Inspection 
and Speech Days, and at countless other times, he was 
present with Mrs. Jones, talking to the boys, following 
every detail of the occasion and taking part in proceedings 
with obvious pleasure. He attended meetings of the Govern- 
ing Body regularly and served on the Scholarship Com- 
mittee. We shall miss him, not only as a friend, but also 
as a generous donor of his time. 

Mr. Jones was a son of Charles S. Jones of St. Mary's, 
Ontario, and a grandson of the Hon. William McDougall. 



10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Entering the Bank of Nova Scotia at an early age, he had 
a long and successful banking career, serving in Regina, 
Calgary, Gait, Ottawa and Toronto before his retirement. 

A veteran of the first Great War, he went overseas as 
a lieutenant with the 4th. Mounted Rifles, later serving in 
France with the Royal Canadian Artillery. He was re- 
turned to Canada as artillery instructor in 1917, and went 
overseas again the next year in command of a regiment. 
He retired at the end of the war with the rank of major. 

His eldest son, Lieutenant Archie Jones ('35-'41), 
R.C.N.V.R., is at sea, and a daughter, Gwynneth, is a Lieu- 
tenant (N/S) in the R.C.A.M.C. Owen Jones ('39-'44) and 
another daughter, Jessie Anne, are at home. 

The School extends its deepest sympathy to Mrs. Jones 
and her family. 





T. ROY JONES 
Governor of the School 







F. G. McLaren ('28-'37) 

Major, 48th. Highlnndcrs 

KiiUd in Action, December 5, 1944 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



11 




CHAPELIMNOTES 



Visit of Bishop Broughall 

On Sunday, November 26, the Rt. Rev. L. W. B. 
Broughall ('88-'94), Lord Bishop of Niagara, preached at 
Evensong taking his text from the twenty-first chapter of 
the Book of the Prophet Ezekiel: "I will overturn, over- 
turn, overturn". 

He explained that man was continually in search of 
new principles, but that these had never lasted more than 
a few years. This is best illustrated by the fact that eight 
hundred treaties of peace were signed between the years 
498 B.C. and 1860 A.D. Since the very finest of our human 
leaders have been proved inadequate, the preacher suggest- 
ed that we should turn to Jesus Christ for leadership and 
crown Him with a new heart and purpose. 



Advent Sunday 



On Advent Sunday, December 1, the Chaplain chose 
his text from the Epistle of the day: "He that loveth an- 
other hath fulfilled the Law". He pointed out that the 
basis of the Law is to love, or care for, one another, and 
that it was the love that Jesus had for everyone and His 
charm of manner that impressed His disciples most. This, 
he emphasized, was even more remarkable when we re- 
member that the other holy men and prophets had taken 
pride in their ruggedness and crudity. But in spite of His 



12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

charm, flattery and dissimulation were strangers to Jesus. 

The Chaplain went on to say that this graciousness 
might have been easy had Christ led an inactive life, but 
though He was dogged by suspicion and hatred until His 
final act of love on the Cross. He was still able to say 
"Father, forgive them". 

In closing he stressed that we have Advent to pray 
that the love of God may enter into us and give us some 
of that rich charity for all men that Christ so markedly 
displayed. 



Christmas Carols 



On Sunday, December 10, the Chaplain preached on 
the origin of Christmas carols, a fitting subject for the 
second Sunday in Advent. He took his text from the 
149th and 150th Psalms, remarking that praises had been 
sung to God from time immemorial and that since the 
early years of Christianity, carols had been sung to honour 
the divinity of our Lord. 

He told us how some of the festivities and carols of 
Christmas had been taken from old heathen feasts, and 
how cynics sometimes maintain that Christmas is but an 
heathen feast which has been Christianized. In defence, 
he pointed out that, since it has been Christianized, it has 
taken on a new meaning. 



THE CAROL SERVICE 

Again this year the Carol service was an outstanding 
success and fortunately there was no repetition of last 
year's organ trouble. The solo parts of the Monarch and 
the Page in "Good King Wenceslas" were sung by Hope 
and Nigel Thompson. The solos in "Masters in this 
Hall", which we had not heard for two years, were taken 
by Huycke i and David Ketchum. The two highlights of the 
service were "The Glory of the Lord" and the "Hallelujah 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 

Chorus", from Handel's Messiah, both of which were ex- 
cellently rendered by the Choir. 

The order of the service was as follows: — 
Processional Hymn — "Adeste Fideles". 
Chorale— * 'Break Forth O Beauteous Heavenly Light"— 

Bach. 
1st Reading— M. E. Wright. 
Choir — "Joseph and the Angel". 
2nd Reading— G. R. Campbell. 
Hymn No. 738— "Unto Us a Boy Is Bom". 
3rd Reading — D. S. Hare. 
Choir — "Good King Wenceslas", 
4th Reading— G. P. H. Vernon. 
Choir — "Carol of the Ox and the Ass". 
Hymn No. 733— "Once in Royal David's City". 
Choir — " 'Twas in the Moon of Winter Time". 
5th Reading — E. J. M. Huycke. 
Choir — "Away in a Manger". 
6th Reading — A. C. Morris, Esq. 
Choir— "When the Sun Had Sunk to Rest". 
Hymn 780— "The First Nowell". 
7th Reading — C. J. Tottenham, Esq. 
Choir — "Love Came Down at Christmas." 



Chapel Donations 



In order to insure a stable donation, the School has 
once again adopted the envelope method of Chapel collec- 
tion. Introduced three years ago, this system was discon- 
tinued for a year and now reappears in its present form. 
At the beginning of the term each boy in the Senior School 
was asked to pledge a certain percentage of his allowance 
each week. Consequently, at Evensong service on Sunday, 
he puts in the collection plate a numbered envelope con- 
taining his contribution. 



14 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Christmas Cheer 

In accordance with custom, the offertory at the Carol 
Service was devoted to assisting needy families. Cheques 
for $15.00 were sent to friends in Ottawa, Kingston, Mon- 
treal. Toronto and Port Hope, so that one more family in 
those places might enjoy a happy Christmas. It is our 
privilege and pleasure to be able to do this small service 
for the cities and towns in which so many of us live. Our 
thanks are due to the friends who were kind enough to 
carry out this service for us. They are Miss Wilhelmina 
Wright, the Very Rev. K. C. Evans, the Very Rev. R. S. K. 
Seeley. the Rev. C. J. Frank, and the Rev. T. H. Crosthwait. 



A Chaplain's Life in the R.C.A.F. 

In a very interesting and informative sermon on Sun- 
day, January 14. Wing Commander the Rev. Bruce Jenn- 
ings, former rector of St. Mark's Church, Port Hope, gave 
an account of the life he had led as a chaplain attached 
to an R.C.A.F. bomber squadron overseas. 

Wing Commander Jennings has just returned from 
England and is now Deputy Director of Chaplain Services 
for the R.C.A.F. In his sermon he described the anxious 
hours before a raid, the briefing and the weather reports, 
and went on to tell of his own feelings as the bombers 
left and returned. He concluded with an appeal that we, 
as Canadians, should pray for these bomber crews, and if 
we have friends or relatives among them, most certainly 
write as there is nothing the boys so much appreciate as 
a letter from home. 



Missions 

On Sunday, January 21, the Chaplain spoke on "mis- 
sions". He made it clear that we are faced to-day with a pre- 
dominantly pagan world. The progress of science and ma- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 

terialistic thinking has outstripped our moral standards, 
and consequently God has been largely forgotten even in 
Christian communities. Man, in his individualism, has be- 
come his own god, the Chaplain continued, and because 
man is rooted in God, he destroys himself when he de- 
stroys God. In some parts of the world faith in our Lord 
is being superseded by faith in political creeds. 

The Chaplain concluded by emphasizing the part that 
the Church can play and is playing in this new crisis. She 
has shown her realization of it by the extent and scope of 
her missionary activities. These activities should be sup- 
ported by each and every individual, for by doing so he will 
be preserving not only the Church, but the very world he 
lives in. 



In Quest of Life 



On Sunday, January 28, the Rev. Dr. Harding Priest 
spoke in Chapel. Dr. Priest is the former Western Field 
Secretary of the Missionary Society of the Church of Eng- 
land in Canada, and is now attached to the Toronto branch 
of that organization. 

Using Alexander Mackenzie as an example, the 
preacher pointed out that we should each have a quest in 
life and adhere to that quest throughout all our difficulties. 
He then mentioned a few of the quests before us, and 
stressed friendship, faith and fair play as three char- 
acteristics that must accompany us on our particular path 
through life if this path is to lead to a successful con- 
clusion. 



Address by the Headmaster 

On February 11, Quinquagesima, the Headmaster 
spoke in Chapel as follows: 

The late Archbishop of Canterbury said: 

"We are fighting against the enemies of Christ but we 



16 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

dare not claim we are lighting in the cause of Christ until 
we have put our own house in order and we are certain 
that victory will be used in His service." 

To-day I propose to look at some of the ills which are 
seriously weakening the civilian life of this country, and 
especially the lives of the boys and girls in our towns and 
cities, the young people on whom the future depends. 

It is not difficult for us to realize the terrible destruc- 
tion of this war, the frightful cost in human lives, in 
broken families, the enormous areas laid waste, productive 
lands and cities now broken and barren — all this we have 
read of and seen in pictures for just five and a half years, 
and we know now that this world has never before wit- 
nessed a struggle so deadly, so annihilating, so overwhelm- 
ing in its magnitude and destructive power. 

But too often we do not realize the ravages which war 
has made at home, in our own countries, still far removed 
from the dreadful material destruction experienced in other 
lands. 

War first fires a resolve to face the foe and win 
through; it unites a people in a willing, disciplined, brave 
effort, and every sacrifice is accepted stoically. Then, as 
the years wear on and the man behind the lines has ex- 
perienced every kind of emotion engendered by war, his 
fine qualities become hardened, his sympathies are directed 
toward himself instead of toward others far worse off, he 
adopts a fatalistic attitude; the future is unknown, uncer- 
tain, life is short, man has to look after himself, so why 
not have all the fun he can. enjoy himself while he is able, 
he is only young once, why worry about self-control, self- 
discipline, even self-direction, they are old-fashioned re- 
straints, he will taste all that is offered, poisoned or not, 
he'll live to the full while he can, he will spend all, money, 
strength, talents, character, he will spend his future on the 
entertainment of the moment. 

Always the last years of war produce such a reckless 
attitude to life and often it is even more noticeable in the 



TPUNITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 

first years of peace. War weariness is at the bottom of 
it but there are other causes. 

Oh yes, we reahze that there will be many problems 
facing us after the war, but what can we do about it. the 
future will have to take care of itself, someone else will 
settle those difficulties; let us live and play for to-morrow 
may never come. Eat, drink and be merry, anything for 
a laugh — it is not exaggeration to say that is the watch- 
word, the uppermost thought in the minds of an alarm- 
ingly large and ever growing number of men and women. 

By the accounts of intelligent observers, this evil is 
permeating life to-day in every country. We've had enough 
of controls, let us be free, and do as we wish. 

Such an attitude to life can undoubtedly be more 
disastrous to the future than the appalling physical de- 
struction of war. Why? Simply because it will destroy 
future generations of our best people; like a creeping 
paralysis it can kill the cohesion of our families and com- 
munities, it will smother the light of learning and throttle 
all ennobling influences. 

What is the plain fact of the civilian life of so many 
of our people to-day? 

The child is born with possibilities of development 
unbounded, in a land of unrivalled opportunities; he is a 
child of God, an inheritor of the Kingdom of heaven; there 
are no limits to the achievements of which he may be 
capable. 

The normal parents nourish his first years with un- 
selfish sacrificial care. 

But in this commercial age, this age of no restraints 
and few standards, this youngster suddenly finds himself 
exposed to a veritable army of insidious influences, each 
one appealing to his weaker self, each one beckoning with 
the finger of indulgence — come and enjoy yourself. As 
soon as he is able to understand his language they attack 
him from all sides. And how few can resist. There has 
never been anything like it in any former age because 



18 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

there was never such an all-pervading means of communi- 
cation — the printing press, the moving pictures, the radio, 
keep pounding at him hour after hour, day after day until 
they have him in their grip. He wanders in a maze of 
what is partly good and in large part bad, with woefully 
few strong arms to put him on the highroad. He is con- 
stantly assailed by an array of trash, appealing to the im- 
mature eye and all the lower emotions, requiring nothing 
but an animal response — all because someone wants to 
make money at the expense of our manhood. 

So terribly much of the ordinary young person's crowd- 
ed environment is to-day a world of ugliness, of debased 
language, of falsehood, of trickery masquerading as clever- 
ness, of greed and selfishness held up as smartness and 
stepping-stones to success, of sex, of crime. 

We pride ourselves on being broad-minded, and there- 
fore we hesitate to condemn any of these influences, calmlj' 
allowing them to infect the finely sensitive and immature 
minds of thousands of our youth, the boys and girls who 
will be in charge of the country in a few years. These 
youngsters are cleverly enticed to waste many of their 
most precious talents and a large part of their most im- 
pressionable years through such influences, and they can 
never regain those years or the first fine rapture of those 
talents. The finish has become soiled, just as if we used 
a Rolls Royce limousine to collect garbage. 

And there are worse results: Some of these infections 
will leave scars for life, some will weaken, some will 
paralyse, some will clearly shorten life. 

It is true that there are better influences at work but 
for the general run of young people they do not have the 
exciting appeal, the commercial backing, the mass popu- 
larity enjoyed by the emotional slush and trash which cor- 
rodes even as it glitters. 

Reports from all quarters lead one to believe that a 
large proportion of our young people are growing up 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 

without ideals, with few standards, with no inspiration 
except self -amusement. 

How have we allowed such a condition to become so 
deep-rooted? It had its beginning at the end of the last 
war; it flourished in the days of unemployment when the 
family without any means of subsistence felt they were not 
wanted and lost faith in the future. War has accelerated 
the condition for opposite reasons. Parents are too busy, 
too tired, to give their youngsters proper supervision, the 
father has been overseas for years, homes are broken up, 
high wages are spent on amusement; youngsters of twelve 
years and up work part time and have money to spend 
as they wish; there is a general slackening of principles 
and control in the homes; young people have grown up in 
an atmosphere of killing and destruction; schools are over- 
crowded and understaffed, often with substitute teachers; 
there is no settled, ordered life, little security which youth 
craves. There is, finally, not nearly sufficient serious, sus- 
tained emphasis on the needs of youth by our leaders. 

Surely we know that what our young people are to- 
day our country will be to-morrow. It is, of course, a 
disgrace that Canada should permit one third of its youth 
to be underdeveloped physically; but that is a matter that 
can be corrected fairly simply and it is beginning to re- 
ceive attention. 

What is much more serious and more difficult to cor- 
rect is the prevalence of the dead-end type of mind, the 
devil-may-care spirit, the get-away-with-it-if-you-can atti- 
tude. 

What can we do about it? The first step is to set our 
own house in order, recapture those strong principles of 
conduct, those ideals of life as a motivating force — onward 
and upward day by day — the religious basis of our life. 
All you boys in this chapel have been specially privileged 
in your upbringing so far, but have you taken full ad- 
vantage of your opportunities to cultivate strong minds, 
strong bodies, strong principles? There is a school routine 



20 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

for you to follow, a curriculum to study, but that is the 
bare minimum required by an educational system which is 
largely inadequate to the needs of youth. The most im- 
portant elements of your school experience can, I believe, 
be summed up under these headings: 

1. The knowledge of personality and character you 
will obtain by the meeting of many different types of peo- 
ple, both those in real life and those in books, and the 
knowledge of yourself which will thus be revealed. 

2. The gradual acquisition of a philosophy of life 
which involves an answer to the question "What is the 
Good Life?" This requires thought and reading about 
religion, about God, about the great leaders of all times, 
and it should result, especially in a community like this, 
in the growth of a self-forgetful sense of corporate re- 
sponsibility — your duty to your neighbour, friendliness. 

3. The gradual discovery of delight and facility in 
certain mental occupations, in reading the best writings of 
all ages, in cultural pursuits — literature, art, architecture, 
sculpture, music, speaking, acting, debating, handicrafts — 
in languages, in numbers, in science, in the story of man. 
A really deep interest in any of these pursuits will make 
you a stronger man in every way, will give you a lasting 
pleasure, will provide a sheet anchor in times of stress, 
and will reveal talents in yourself which you never suspect- 
ed. 

4. The development of a sound and strong body 
through leading a regular, controlled life, balancing work 
with leisure, physical exercise with mental exercise and 
both with relaxation, learning always to be master of 
yourself, steering clear of self-indulgence and dissipation 
in any of their forms. "I am the master of my fate, I am 
the captain of my soul." 

You know well the truth of the old saying — thoughts 
give birth to acts, acts give birth to habits, and habits de- 
velop character. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 21 

If character, your very self, stems from thoughts, 
then thoughts are extremely important things. The every 
day mental world, as I have tried to show you, is full of 
infection. Yet how often we open wide the doorways of 
our eyes and ears and allow all manner of infection to 
enter. 

If we knew such mental food were poisoned, perhaps 
we should hesitate to let it in, but it is well disguised and 
offered to us in quantities before we have learnt to judge, 
to discriminate. 

The only safe rule to follow is to seek out the best all 
through our younger years until by our own efforts and 
the help of trusted leaders we have set up for ourselves 
a sense of values, a set of principles and standards which 
will enable us to detect the cheap, the tawdry, the ugly, 
the merely sensuous appeal and shut out such debasing 
influence by the sheer weight and fineness of the best. 

That is the great purpose of our younger years — to 
build up sure foundations of wisdom, of J earning and 
knowledge, the heritage of the ages, on which we can 
safely fashion a distinctive superstructure in after years. 

It is of vital importance, then, that we learn to dis- 
criminate, to distinguish between good and evil, and that 
we cleave to the good and abhor that which is evil. 

Behind this whole conception there must be an in- 
spiration, a motivating force. And surely it is the knowl- 
edge that one man can move mountains, that history is 
full of such momentous deeds when whole nations and 
groups of nations have been led by the ideas and ideals 
and vivid appeal of men who were inspired by great 
thoughts. 

God made man in his own likeness, but how often man 
has debased himself. The Spirit of man is the Candle of 
the Lord, but how often the light barely flickers or is 
snuffed out by man himself. 

Some seed fell by the wayside, some fell on the rock, 
some fell among thorns and the thorns sprang up with it 



22 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



and choked it — the world is full of weeds. But some fell 
on good soil and sprang up and bore fruit an hundredfold. 

In this coming season of Lent let us examine our- 
selves and the world we live in, face our shortcomings, 
realize our temptations, and resolve to strengthen our- 
selves now for the coming battle of life. 

Sink your roots deep in the soO of all good learning 
now, while you have time, and so store up nourishment 
and character that you may withstand every onslaught 
and bear much fruit in due season. 





THE GEORGE PERCIVAL SCHOLFIELD MEMORIAL 




im- Rl-V. I-. H. COSGRAVH 
Retiring Provost of Trinity Osllege 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



23 




oo 

NOTES 




The Provost 

Many present and former members of T.C.S. will have 
learned with regret that the Reverend F. H. Cosgrave, Pro- 
vost of Trinity College and member of the Board of Gover- 
nors of Trinity College School, has announced his impend- 
ing retirement. 

During the eighteen years of his provostship the Col- 
lege has made strong and steady growth in its scholarship, 
in its academic equipment of men and material, in the 
beauty and utility of its buildings, in its contribution to the 
intellectual, social, and athletic life of the University. 

Strachan Hall, the new St. Hilda's, the new East Wing. 
will stand as memorials, not only to the founding fathers 
and benefactors whose names are inscribed upon their tab- 
lets, but equally to the faith and high courage of the man 
who caused them to be erected in troubled and precarious 
days. Provost Cosgrave will go down to history as the 
building Provost. 

Not only that. With his retirement the College and 
the University will lose a man of wise counsel, both pri- 
vate and public, a man of few words, but weighty and well- 
timed, a man of sympathy and understanding, a humourist 
and hater of cant and sham, a man of resolution and 
authority, of whom it may well be quoted: "A great man 
who neither sought nor shunned greatness; who found 
glory only because glory lay in the plain path of duty." 

We are glad to know that the Provost expects to stay 
in Toronto and we look forward to seeing him often in 
Port Hope. 



24 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Admiral Nelles 

Percy W. Nelles ('07-'08), a Governor of the School, 
retired from the Royal Canadian Navy on January 10 with 
the rank of admiral, completing thirty-six years in the 
service; he is fifty-three years of age. 

Joining the Royal Canadian Navy in 1908 at the age 
of sixteen, he was the second of the first seven Canadian 
naval cadets to enrol. He served as lieutenant with the 
Royal Navy from 1914 to 1917 in various ships and in 1917 
came to Ottawa as flag lieutenant to Admiral Kingsmill. 
later returning to England to take a staff course. 

Admiral Nelles has held the appointments of senior 
naval officer at Halifax and at Esquimalt and was the first 
Canadian trained officer to command a cruiser in the Royal 
Navy. He was appointed chief of naval staff at Ottawa in 
1934. Promotion to the rank of rear-admiral came on 
August 4, 1938, and to vice-admiral in November, 1941. In 
January, 1944, he was appointed to go to London from 
where he directed Canadian naval operations. 

In January, 1943, he was created a Companion of The 
Most Honourable Order of the Bath by His Majesty the 
King, for the distinguished service he has given to his 
Country and Commonwealth. 

The following editorial appeared in the Montreal Star 
entitled "The Man Who Built the Navy" .... 

"On the day that war v/as declared, the British Ad- 
miralty signalled the Canadian Chief of Naval Staff: 'How 
soon can you begin convoy operations.' The answer came 
back: 'Immediately'. And six days later the tiny Cana- 
dian Navy escorted eighteen merchantmen into the open 
Atlantic, delivering them safely to their destination. 

"In those days the Navy had little to work with. It 
had been that way for years. But it worked well with 
what it had. How well its planning was done through the 
lean years has since been fully demonstrated by the 
amazing programme of expansion carried out. From six- 
teen ships and less than two thousand men, the Navy has 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 25 

grown to more than seven hundred ships and eighty thou- 
sand men. 

"Today the man who was behind all this planning, the 
man who stuck to his desk in those years when no one was 
much interested in paying taxes for ships or sailors, has 
retired to private life after thirty-six years in Canada's 
naval uniform. He is Percy Walker Nelles, who started 
as a middy and yesterday became the Dominion's first full 
Admiral. His contribution to the nation has been immense, 
perhaps far greater than other than still secret war re- 
cords can show. To him the thanks of Canada are due, 
and his new rank is the country's expression of its grati- 
tude." 



Miss Smith 



It was a deep sorrow to her many friends to learn that 
Miss E. M. Smith had decided to retire at the end of Mic- 
haelmas Term. Miss Smith well deserves a rest after 
nearly twenty-one years of faithful service, but she had 
seemed such a permanent part of T.C.S. that it is going 
to be extremely difficult to become used to life without her. 
She promises to visit us in the spring on her return from 
Florida, and we shall look forward to seeing her then, be- 
fore she leaves for England. 

Miss Smith originally planned to teach in England, 
where she was born, but circumstances made it impossible 
and she took a post at Shrewsbury as Matron; she re- 
mained there for ten years. In 1921 she went to St. 
Alban's School, Brockville, as Matron and in September, 
1924, she accepted the post of Matron at the new T.C.S. 
Junior School. She remained in that capacity for ten 
years, doing excellent work, and in 1934 she was appointed 
Matron in the Senior School. 

During her twenty years at the School, Miss Smith 
never spared herself and showed a remarkable ability to 
take control of any situation and make the best of it. In 



26 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

the Junior School she had charge of all the boys' clothing, 
a tremendous task in itself, but in addition she acted as 
dietitian for several years. In the Senior School she look- 
ed after the clothing arrangements for a maximum of 
nearly two himdred boys, as well as supervising the clean- 
ing of the houses. 

In addition to these tasks. Miss Smith gave unsparing- 
ly of her time to the Chapel, as President of the Chapel 
Guild. She ran a stamp club in the Junior School, and 
she was interested in many worthwhile movements in the 
town, especially those connected with St. Mark's Church. 

At the Christmas Supper on December 19, the Head- 
master gave Miss Smith a silver salver, suitably engraved, 
as a small token of the gratitude of the School for her 
long and unselfish service. Miss Smith made a gracious 
little speech in which she spoke of her very pleasant years 
at T.C.S. 

The School wishes Miss Smith many years of health 
and happiness, with time to use her varied talents to the 
full. 



Letter from General Murison 

The Headmaster has received the following letter from 
Major General C. A. P. Murison. C.B., C.B.E., M.C.. ('11- 
'13), Deputy Quartermaster-General to the Forces, the 
War Office. London: 

"From time to time I meet Old Boys and it gives one 
a pleasant feeling of pride to find so high a proportion 
holding positions of leadership, while to you and the School 
it must be a constant source of encouragement and grati- 
fication. 

"Difficult as the past five years have been. I feel that 
even more difficult times lie ahead, when so many war-torn 
countries will be looking to the English-speaking nations 
for sustenance and support and when those who have been 
standing up to the stress of war in the field and in the fac- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 27 

tories will be anxiously seeking opportunities to take up 
the threads which the war has broken. Consequently 
opportunities for leadership will be greater than ever in 
the days that lie ahead and, in preparing for 'the shape 
of things to come', the School will be carrying on into peace 
the record of service it has established in war". 



Gifts to the School 



Mrs. M. K. Dillane, Schomberg, Ontario, was a recent 
contributor to the War Memorial Fund for the building of 

the new Chapel. 

***** 

Argue Martin, K.C. ('14-'17), has sent two squash 
racquets to the School. 



The Silver Medal for English 

His Honour, the Lieutenant-Gk)vemor of Ontario, has 
kmdly sent another Silver Medal for Christopher Bovey 
('41-'44) who was judged to be equal to Millward for his 
proficiency in the English language and Literature last 
year. 



Staff Changes 



Mr. Meyer left us at Christmas and we wish him good 
luck in his future work. He is hoping to be able to take 
up his Fellowship at Harvard University. 

Mr. A. E. White has joined the staff and we extend a 
hearty welcome to him. Gaining his M.A. at McMaster 
University, Mr. White taught French for twenty-three 
years at Westmount High School, Montreal. 

We also welcome, for the second time, Mr. J. W. Kerr 
('33-'37) who has been with us off and on since last Sep- 
tember. Last term he assisted in the coaching of football ; 



28 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

this term he is coaching basketball with Mr. Hodgetts and 
giving invaluable assistance in the Old Boys' office. 



The Conservatory Junior Trio 

On the evening of Wednesday, November 29, the 
School had the privilege of hearing a concert in Hall pre- 
sented by the Conservatory Junior Trio. The artists, Mary 
Ann Paul, Dorothy Applebaum and Carl Kaye, played 
throughout the performance with amazing accuracy, skill 
and precision. The selections, made up of trios and solos 
for violin, 'cello and piano, were both varied and interesting. 

The programme was as follows: — Allegro from Trio 
in B flat . , . Schubert; Marchen . . . Komzak; Claire de 
Lune (piano) . . . Debussy; Rondo alia Turca . . . Mozart; 
Medley . . . Victor Herbert; Ave Maria . . . Schubert; Tam- 
bourin . . . Gossec; Andante . . . Beethoven; Marche Vien- 
noise . . . Kreisler; Romance ('cello) . . . Rubinstein; Still 
as Night . . . Boehm; Medley of waltzes . . . Chopin; Fan- 
tasy . . . Strauss; God Save the King. 



The Football Dinner 



On Friday, December 8, the annual Football Dinner 
was held in Hall. The members of Bigside Football, Big- 
side Soccer, the Captains and Vice-Captains of the various 
teams, the Coaches, the Headmaster, and a number of 
guests were present. 

After a very sumptuous dinner consisting in part of 
fried chicken and ice cream with chocolate sauce, the Head- 
master reviewed briefly the highlights of the season, em- 
phasizing particularly the wonderful fighting spirit which 
pervaded the team at all times. Mr. Hodgetts told the ex- 
tremely interesting history of football from its first appear- 
ance to the present day and concluded with a few remarks 
concerning this year's first team. The Coach was followed 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 29 

by Huycke i, who extended his thanks to the members of 
the squad individually and especially to Mr. Hodgetts for- 
his untiring efforts throughout the season. Sinclair men- 
tioned the substitutes and the teams of Middleside and 
Littleside. Concluding speeches were made by Mr. Thomp- 
and Cox i, the Coach and Captain of Soccer respectively. 

Jim Kerr then showed the moving pictures he had 
taken of the Little Big Four games. These were very 
much appreciated, for at hand were lasting glimpses of 
some of the team's most exciting games. 

The final talk of the evening was given by Mr. Syd. 
Saunders ('16-'20), Vice-President of the Toronto Branch 
of the Old Boys' Association, who endorsed the Head- 
master's remarks establishing this year's team as one that 
future Old Boys may well look back to with pride. 

Sterling silver discs engraved with the School crest 
were again presented to all winners of First and Half -First 
Team Football Colours by the Old Boys. 



Christmas Dinner and Entertainment 

Fourteen long weeks had faded into distant memories 
as the School sat down to Christmas dinner on December 
19. Two hundred pairs of eyes contemplated nineteen 
turkeys and other familiar Christmas eatables with relish 
and enthusiasm; not so long afterwards, two hundred pairs 
of rather more blissful eyes gazed dreamily at nineteen 
bony carcasses and two hundred empty plates, as their 
owners uttered short and silent but sincere praise to Mrs. 
Wilkin and her staff. 

Languid eyes focused a little more alertly as the 
Headmaster announced after dinner that Distinction Caps 
had been awarded to Huycke i and Mclntyre i for their per- 
formances during the football season, and to Cox i for his 
achievements in soccer. Soon, genuine consternation could 
be plainly observed in the eyes of everyone when the Head- 
master broke the news of Miss Smith's impending depar- 



30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

ture. The latter, in her capacity as School matron, nad 
looked after the clothing of innumerable T.C.S. boys for 
twenty years, had darned more socks than people will ever 
hazard a guess at, had found the shoes, ties, coats and 
shirts of the sloppiest new boy and the grimmest Head 
Prefect, and in doing so had ascended to the top of the 
bell tower and descended into the depths of the swimming 
pool. In short, she had performed heroic service, efficiently 
and without fanfare, for twenty years. Miss Smith was 
presented with a silver salver which brought tumultuous 
applause, a very small token of the School's appreciation. 

After certain individuals had been helped out of the 
dining hall, and propped on chairs in the gym. from which 
they might watch proceedings, the Christmas entertain- 
ment got under way, quickly gathering speed. The Choir 
lulled everyone into a sense of false security (including Mr. 
Scott and Col. Stevenson) while the actors (?) made ready 
behind the scenes. Cox and Gibson (to confuse the police 
we will dispense with incriminating initials) proceeded to 
put on their version of a billiard game. Continuing, the 
entertainment took the form of two or three good stunts, 
one of which,"The Fatal Bracelet" or "Was She Pushed?", 
being written, produced, directed and acted in by Gay 
Gordon. This and "Hugo in a Hurry", produced and 
directed by Currie, were both really excellent, the first one 
in particular being extremely — well, shall we say, humour- 
ous? 

The hit of the evening, however, was Bigside's musi- 
cal. "The Bowery", the story of a hick in New York. Peo- 
ple who can't sing always put a musical across better any- 
way ! ! In conclusion, it might be well to call to your 
attention the name of H. C. Butterfield, interspersed at 
regular intervals throughout the programme. Chester is 
our intellectual humourist, and after watching his antics 
on the stage, we often tolerantly wonder about the thin 
line between genius and insanity. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 

At this point it would be only fair to mention the faith- 
ful co-operation of all those who were not conspicuous 
during the actual performances. In addition to the re- 
sourcefulness of Mr. Maier, without whose aid the evening 
would have been impossible, the success of the entertain- 
ment was due to the large staff of electricians, stage hands, 
directors and property men among whom Mr. Hodgetts, 
Mr. Cohu, Mr. Hill. Mr. George Campbell, John Irwin, Pat 
Vernon and George Currie stood out for their untiring 
labour and interest. Nor should the herculean accomplish- 
ments of Mrs. Maier, Mrs. Lewis and Mrs. Gwynne-Timothy 
remain unmentioned as their make-up productions were 
really something to see. 

The programme follows: — 

1. The Junior School Choir — Direction of Mr. Cohu. 

2. The Senior School Choi'r — Direction of Mr. Cohu. 

3. "Lost in a Fog".— 

Thompson, Gill, Whitfield, Riddell. Produced by 
Gill. 

4. Alto Choir — Direction of Mr. Cohu. 

5. "A BiUiard Game". 

Produced and directed by Cox i and Gibson ii. 

6. "The Great Gonzalli". 

By H. C. Butterfield. 

7. "The Last Straw". 

Evans, Anderson, Mahaffy, Prower. Produced by 
the cast. 

8. A Rope Trick. 

Direction of Butterfield i. 

9. "The Fatal Bracelet" or "Was She Pushed?". 

Mortimer Trueblood, Gordon; Annabelle, Hare; 
Black Boris, Hope; Ickalo, Richardson. Produced 
and directed by the cast. 
11. "Hugo in a Hurrj". 

Mr. Sparks, McDougall; Hugo, Drew; Letty, 
French ii; Mrs. Hale, Lawson; Mr. Butler, Allen; 



32 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Mrs. Butler, McDonough. Produced and directed 
by Currie by special arrangement with the Drama- 
tic Publishing Company of Chicago, HI. 

12. "The Bowery". 

Mclntyre i. Wade, Huycke i, Sinclair, French i, 
Wilson i, Pearson i, Stokes, McMurrich, Richard- 
son, Vernon, Lambert, Toole, Greig, Robson, 
Howard, Gillan, Dobell i. Greenwood, Warner, 
Allen, Gilbert. Produced and directed by Mr. and 
Mrs. Hodgetts. Acknowledgments: Bovaird, 
Decker, Roenisch. 

Acknowledgments: Costumes — Miss Smith, Mrs. 
Gwynne-Timothy. Make-up — Mrs. Maier, Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. 
Gwynne-Timothy. Properties — Ligertwood; Assistant, 
Bird. Curtain man — Ligertwood. Stage — Under the 
direction of Mr. Maier; Stage hands: Stokes, Hawke i, 
Nicholson, Vernon, Stanger, Gillan, Pearson ii. Technician 
— Irwin. Special acknowledgment — Mr. Geo. Campbell, 



Christmas Greetings 



Many Old Boys on active service were kind enough to 
send best wishes to the School at Christmas. Their cards 
and comments were more appreciated than they can realize, 
and all at the School are most grateful for their thought- 
ful remembrances. 



Inter-House Shooting 



The Inter-House Musketry Competition was won again 
by Brent House for the year 1944-45. This year's averages 
were Brent 19.73, Bethune 19.53, as compared with last 
year's 20.29 for Brent and 19.97 for Bethune. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 33 

Visit of Mr. Robson 

T.C.S. greatly enjoyed the four day visit of Mr. Rob- 
son who stayed with us January 21-25, after conducting 
several Junior School members up from Mexico. His 
sparkling humour did much to enliven meals at the Head 
table and his departure has been keenly felt by those boys 
who were fortunate enough to sit near him. 



The New Chapel 



In the centre of this issue we publish the plan of the 
present School buildings, together with additions proposed 
in the future. Of these additions, it is hoped that the new 
Chapel will be commenced very soon after peace is de- 
clared. 

Several possible locations have been suggested for the 
Chapel, amongst which are the following: — 

(1) Between the Junior and Senior Schools, as in- 
dicated on the plan. 

(2) To the West beyond the Memorial Cross, also in- 
dicated on the plan. 

(3) To the West of Trinity House, in place of the 
future West house (see plan). 

(4) Directly West and across the road from the 
gymnasium. 

(5) Directly North and across the road from the 
gymnasium. 

In order to assist in deciding upon the location of the 
Chapel, we ask all Old Boys to indicate their suggestions 
on the plan, tearing out the centre insert and mailing it to 
the Headmaster. 



Thanks 

The Record Staff wishes to thank Mr. Key for his 
great help in connection with our last issue. 



34 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

News ill Hall 

"Extry, extry"! This was the cry of Mr. "Ross" Cox, 
dehvering newspapers in the corridors of T.C.S. At long 
last he was on the job! For two weeks no paper had 
passed through the portals of the School, and the inmates 
were starving for news. So, in the days preceding the 
papers, the news of the day was broadcast in the Dining- 
hall every Friday and Monday evening at half-past six. 
The commentator, Geoffrey ("Mike") Pearson, kept the 
School up with the latest news with "flashes" from Europe 
and the Far East. We are deeply appreciative of Mr. 
Pearson's penetrating summaries, and, now that "Ross" is 
back on the job, recall them with the greatest of admira- 
tion. 

"FLASH"! We have just received word that Mr. 
Pearson and his colleagues, sponsored by the T.C.S. Poli- 
tical Science Club, will continue their bi-weekly com- 
mentaries. 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 35 

AWARDS FOR VALOUR AND DISTINGUISHED 
SERVICE 

Old Boys of the School have received the following 
awards during the present war: — 

Knight Commander of The Most Honourable Order of the 

Bath (K.C.B.) — 

Brigadier General Sir G. D. Rhodes, R.E. 
Knight Bachelor (K.B.) — 

Brigadier General Sir E. O. Wheeler, R.E. 
Companion of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath 

(C.B.)— 

Air Marshal W. A. Bishop, R.C.A.F. (retired). 

Major-General C. A. P. Murison, R.A. 

Admiral P. W. Nelles, R.C.N, (retired). 
Commander of The Most Excellent Order of the British 

Empire (C.B.E.) — 

Group Captain A. P. Campbell, R.A.F. 

The Hon. Mr. Justice P. H. Gordon. 

Major-General C. A. P. Murison, R.A, 
Officer of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire 

(O.B.E.) — 

Brigadier B. M. Archibald, R.E. 

Brigadier I. H. Cumberland, Armoured Corps. 

Acting Commander D. E. ff. Jemmett, R.C.N.V.R. 
(non-operational) . 

Commander F. A. Price, R.C.N.V.R. (non-operational). 

Brigadier J. G. Spragge, Q.O.R.C. 
Member of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire 

(M.B.E.) — 

Captain T. L. Alexander, Algonquin Regt. (P.O.W.). 

Captain W. K. W. Baldwin, Toronto Scottish Regt. 

Major G. L. Boone, 48th. Highlanders. 

Chaplain & Hon. Major C. H. Boulden, C.M.H.Q. 

Major W. H. Broughall, R.H.L.I. 

H. H. Leather. 



36 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

George Cross (G.C.) — 

Captain J. M. S. Patton, R.C.E. 
Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) — 

Lieutenant-Colonel G. Gaisford, Royal Armoured 
Corps. 

Brigadier J. G. Spragge, Q.O.R.C. 

Wing Commander B. D. Russel, R.C.A.F. 

Lieutenant-Colonel G. D. Wotherspoon, Armoured 
Corps. 
Distinguished Service Cross (D.S.C.) — 

Lieutenant L. R. McLernon, R.C.N.V.R. 

Lieutenant W. R. Wright, R.C.N.V.R. (demobilized). 

Military Cross (M.C.) — 

Lieutenant M. C. D. Bowman, R.C.R. 

Hon. Captain R. T. F. Brain, S.D. & G. Highlanders. 

Captain H. A. R. Martin, R.C.A. 

Major D. W. McLean, P.P.C.L.I. 

Lieutenant G. L. Rawlinson, Royal Canadian Dragoons. 
Distinguished Flying Cross (D.F.C.) — 

Flight Lieutenant J. B. Cleveland, R.C.A.F. 

Flight Lieutenant J. W. P. Draper. R.C.A.F. 

Flying Officer H. F. G. Ede, R.A.F. (Killed in Action). 

Flight Lieutenant R. G. Keefer. R.C.A.F. 

Flight Lieutenant P. A. McFarlane. R.C.A.F. 

Flight Lieutenant R. D. McLaren, R.A.F. 

Group Captain A. R. McLernon, R.C.A.F. 

Wing Commander P. G. St. G. O'Brian. R.A.F. 

Wing Commander B. D. Russel, R.C.A.F. 

Flying Officer J. S. Thomson, R.C.A.F. 
Bar to D.F.C— 

Wing Commander P. G. St. G. O'Brian, R.A.F. 

Wing Commander B. D. Russel, R.C.A.F. 
Air Force Cross (A.F.C.) — 

Flight Lieutenant D. H. Armstrong, R.C.A.F. 

Flight Lieutenant W. A. Black, R.C.A.F. (Killed in 
Action). 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 37 

Efficiency Decoration (E.D.) — 

Major G. L. Boone, 48th. Highlanders. 

Major J. M. Catto, R.C.C.S. 

Brigadier I. H. Cumberland, Armoured Corps. 

Major F. L. Grout, Q.O.R.C. 

Captain C. F. Haultain, Midland Regt. 

Lieutenant-Colonel M. Jaquays, the Black Watch. 

Major E. A. M. Jarvis, N.D.H.Q. 

Major R. L, Merry, 48th. Highlanders. 

Major R. E. H, Ogilvie, Armoured Corps. 

Brigadier J. G. Spragge, Q.O.R.C. 

Colonel J. G. K. Strathy, Q.O.R.C. 

Captain F. M. Sutcliffe, R.C.A. 

Lieutenant-Colonel G. D. Wotherspoon, Armoured 
Corps. 
Mentioned in Despatches — 

Lieutenant J. C. L. Annesley, R.C.N. 

Group Captain A. P. Campbell, R.A.F. 

Captain D. B. Dawson. 

Squadron Leader P. H. Douglas, R.C.A.F. 

Wing Commander J. C. Dumbrille, R.C.A.F. 

Squadron Leader J. B. A. Fleming, R.A.F. 

Wing Commander D. E. Galloway, R.C.A.F. 

Lieutenant H. G. Hampson, R.C.N.V.R. 

Captain D. M. Irwin, Armoured Corps. 

Corporal P. C. Landry, R.C.A.F. 

Lieutenant D. J. Lewis, R.C.N.V.R. 

Captain A. L. MacLaurin, the Black Watch. 

Group Captain A. R. McLernon, R.C.A.F. 

Flight Lieutenant J. W. F. Peacock, R.C.A.F. (Killed 
in Action). 

Wing Commander P. B. Pitcher, R.C.A.F. 

Squadron Leader R. P. Vaughan, R.C.A.F. 

Lieutenant D. M. Waters, R.C.N. 
Croix de Guerre with Bronze Star (Foreign Decoration) — 

Captain A. L. MacLaurin, the Black Watch. 



38 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



D.F.C. & Air Medal with Four Oak Leaf Clusters- 
Lieutenant Gordon K, Jones, U.S. Army Air Corps. 

D.F.C. & Air Medal with Three Oak Leaf Clusters- 
Lieutenant K. W. A. Bevan, U.S. Army Air Corps. 

Bronze Star Medal — 

Captain Harry Godshall, U.S. Army. 





TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL REXJORD 39 

SCHOOL 

O E B AT E 5 

Compulsory Militarj^ Training 

Debating this year has been started on an interest 
basis. All Fifth and Sixth Form boys must, however, be 
present at a minimum of three debates and participate in 
at least one either by speaking from the floor or by acting 
as a main speaker. 

The first debate was held on Friday, January 19, in 
the Hall. As the motion before the House it was resolved 
that a year of compulsory military training should be pro- 
vided for all physically fit Canadian males on reaching the 
age of eighteen. Upholding the motion were Dobell i, 
Paterson i and Pearson i while Cox i, Vernon and Butter- 
field i spoke for the negative. Mr. Thompson was in the 
Speaker's chair, but the usual judges were dispensed with 
as the members of the Debating Committee were taking 
part in the discussion. 

The leader of the affirmative, Dobell i, spoke of the 
benefits which the individual would derive from such a 
system of army service. Paterson i then pointed out the 
benefit to the country as a whole, and Pearson i concluded 
wuth the argument that such a system was essential to the 
maintenance of international peace in the post-war era. For 
the negative, the speakers limited themselves almost en- 
tirely to enlarging upon the probable opposition of the in- 
dividual to such a scheme, presenting the disadvantages he 
would face through this sudden interruption of his higher 
education. They also maintained that the adoption of 
peace time military training would further the possibilities 



40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

of revolution in the country. The motion was rejected by 
the House by a vote of forty-four to twenty. 



Dombiion vs. Provincial Control of Education 

On Saturday, January 27, the second debate of the 
year took place in the Hall. The motion was: "Resolved 
that education, as supervised by the Provincial Govern- 
ments, should be transferred to the jurisdiction of the 
Dominion Government". 

Hallward, speaking first for the affirmative, pointed 
out that national as well as provincial unity could be 
obtained by such a system as he and his colleagues ad- 
vocated. He also declared that it would effect among 
Canadian youth a greater realization of the issues at stake. 

Lehman, the second speaker upholding the motion, 
said that a more equal educational standard could be main- 
tained throughout the Dominion because the Federal 
Government would be able to finance the scheme. He 
asserted that at present there is too much difference be- 
tween the educational standards of the provinces. 

Main, speaking last for the affirmative, expressed the 
opinion that the Dominion Government's jurisdiction of 
the educational system would aid in bringing about a 
national culture which is now lacking in Canada. 

For the negative, White i pointed out the danger that 
the political party in power would influence the civil ser- 
vice and thus control the education of the Dominion. 

Gibson i, the second main speaker to oppose the 
motion, proposed that in place of the system advocated a 
different one be put into effect whereby the provinces 
mi°"ht come to some agreement concerning educational 

policy. 

Drew, the final speaker for the negative, pointed out 
that different types of training were necessary in the 
various provinces. He also claimed that under the pro- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 41 

posed system a crisis would arise among the teachers be- 
cause most of the best ones were at present to be found 
in the east. 

There were several short speeches from the floor. 
Dobell i then spoke for the judges and declared that, close 
though the debate had been, it was felt that the affirma- 
tive had won by a slight margin. A vote of the House 
upheld this decision by a count of 12-11. 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

The Editor. January 31, 1945. 

T.C.S. "Record". 
Port Hope, Ont. 

Dear Sir: 

I am taking the liberty of writing you on behalf of 
another group of boys in the School, and I hope you will 
receive it in the spirit in which it is intended. 

I have attended as many basketball games as possible 
since coming to the School, and at every game I have been 
impressed by the lack of enthusiasm shown by the mem- 
bers of the School, as indicated by the exceedingly small 
number of boys who turn out to watch them. 

I am prompted to write this letter by the showing 
put forth by the School in the game with Cobourg to-day. 
Last night there was a hockey game which the School was 
expected to win and ninety per cent of the boys attended. 
But to-day, Bigside Basketball played a team which was 
as strong as themselves, and which might easily have 
beaten them, and their School failed to support them. In 
fact, in the last half of the game, there were more Cobourg 
supporters than School supporters; more Cobourg sup- 
porters in our own gym. which is nine miles from Cobourg ! 
This is a disgrace to the School. 

We have a good basketball team this year and thev 



42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

deserve our full support. Let us show a little more School 
spirit in the future and give our teams the backing which 
they certainly need and rightfully deserve. 

Respectfully yours, 

A Member of Bigside Hockey. 



BRIEF BIOGRAPHY 

BANNISTER, K. H.— "Ken" shivered into T.C.S. in 1941, 
with memories of his warm Mexico still lingering in his 

' thoughts. Although he soon acclimatized himself, he 
never tired of spreading Mexican propaganda during 
his four years at the School. In his final year, Ken, 
never what is known as a "brain," was a sterling mem- 
ber of the Sixth Form, a House Officer, and played on 
Middleside soccer. He made a place for himself in the 
"smoker", where, it seems, he was a devoted addict of 
swing records. He was universally liked and his Mexi- 
can broadcasting system was obviously very effective as 
he had many of the "smoker" itching to go there. He 
was, in his own quiet way, one of the most pleasant 
characters in the School. He left us at Christmas to 
join the Army; we wish him all the success in the world, 
and hope the Army will like this "mad Mexican" as much 
as we did. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



43 



Contributions 




MUSIC IN NATURE 

Have you ever listened to the wind sighing in the firs, 
or heard it whistling angrily around a corner? Have you 
heard the crash of the surf on a rock bound shore, or the 
soft ripple of a wave? Have you noticed the rumble of 
distant thunder and the hurried patter of raindrops on a 
roof? K you have heard these things, you have heard 
the music of nature. Indeed, nature seems a living thing 
when we hear these sounds. We can picture a pla>'ful 
breeze or a raging tempest. We can personify the wind; 
can imagine it as having emotions, changing feelings or 
different moods. Little wonder that the early Greeks 
worshipped a god of wind and a god of nature. It is the 
wind that brings nature's music to our ears. We can stand 
on a high hill with a strong, malicious wind whipping 
around us and watch the black clouds scud across the sky. 
It is as if the scene before us were the setting for a play, 
and the things we see, the trees swaying, the clouds and 
the waving grass, the actors. These are nature's players 
and we can watch this ever changing parade of nature 
pass before us. In perfect accompaniment the music of 
nature is playing. The wind hissing through the tall grass, 
the branches rubbing together, and the rustling of the 
leaves all portray nature's mood in sound as the clouds 
and the trees act out the drama. And this drama can be 



44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

just as gentle as it can be strong and cruel . . . Picture a 
moonlight night; a breeze rippling the water ever so gently 
and whispering in the tree tops .... Here again nature's 
music corresponds with her mood, gentle and soft. 

At night the sounds of nature are multiplied a thou- 
sandfold. As Daudet says, "The day is the life of beings, 
but the night, it is the life of things." At night the least 
sound is magnified and nature's symphony of sound plays 
clearly and beautifully. Sometimes we feel that we can 
hear something that we can actually only see. The beauty 
of the scene fills our hearts with music. Can you imagine 
a softer, more delicate sound than snow falling or grass 
growing? Sometimes at night when the sounds of the 
brooks and the wind singing through the branches of the 
trees are clear and distant, and everything else is still, you 
feel that you can even hear the grass growing. 

Nature is also heard in thousands of little animals: in 
the singing birds; the chattering of a squirrel; the crazy 
call of a loon; the humming of a myriad of insects on a 
still night or the chirrup of a single cricket; the trilling 
call of the first robin seeming as though he will burst with 
joy. All these are parts of nature's music. Seldom do we 
hear discord in her orchestra. The players know their 
parts to perfection and can adjust their tones to suit the 
mood of their conductor. What can be more fitting than 
the swelling trill of the song sparrow on the break of a 
summer's mom, or what can suit the whole setting of 
nature better than the hoarse call of a crow on a bleak 
grey day in November? 

Man has captured some of nature's music in his own. 
Beethoven, sitting in a dark room lit only by a candle, try- 
ing to compose, threw open the shutters and a flood of 
moonlight swept into the room. The beauty of it inspired 
him. It was nature's music without sound and he was 
able to interpret it in his lovely Moonlight Sonata. 

Yes, nature's music is wonderful. Its scope is un- 
limited. It can go from an impassioned, crashing crescendo 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 45 

at the height of a storm to the soothing dripping of rain- 
drops through the trees after the thunder has passed. 
Nature's every mood has appropriate and beautiful accom- 
paniment in her music. 

— p.c.s. 



REFLECTION 



If, after storms have drenched a dripping land, 
Some chance commercial traveller should drive 
His green sedan down tracks of mud and sand. 
Until, near crumbling chaff long since alive. 

And trees and bushes tombed in living rain, 
He meets and crosses some concession road, 
Laid for the passage of ancestral grain, 
But broken now beneath the heavy load, 

He might, each snaking fence in safety pass, 
From a distance hear a mighty cataract. 
And pause, amid the mud, adhering fast. 
Where newly sprouts of green confirm the fact 

That life still lives, and evening's clouded light 
Outlines the traveller's slowly coming fight. 

— G.D.W. 



THE INFLUENCE OF WARS ON THE DEVELOPMENT 
OF CIVILIZATION 

War has a very beneficial effect on the world's civiliza- 
tion. I do not hold with those who condemn war as a 
senseless debacle for it has proved itself in history to be 
the only way by which man is able to purge himself of 
decay and degradation. It is quite possible that man's 
beginnings can be traced to some war between quadrupeds 
in which one side, in order to win, found it more expedient 



46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

while fighting to stand on two legs. Down through his- 
tory the same basic principle of wars causing progress can 
be found. 

In ancient history we have numerous clear examples 
of this. In the Tigris-Euphrates valley, cradle of civiliza- 
tion, many civilizations rose, added their contributions to 
man's knowledge, fell into decay and corruption and were 
destroyed by some newer, more virile race which repeated 
the process. Wars then were the advancement of man to 
keep him on the upward path to greater heights. Egypt 
is a repetition of this story. Her culture reached a new 
level in man's civilization but at a point she stopped and 
sank back into near oblivion. Once more, after the cam- 
paigns of Alexander the Great had swept over the world, 
did she rise to a brief new peak, but here the decay had 
advanced too far and even the stimulus of the first world 
war could not lift that race out of its rut of degradation. 

China is the other great civilization in early times. 
Here we have a magnificent example of what could hap- 
pen if peace, at least comparative peace, were to allow 
civilization, after reaching a new peak, to be left to 
languish. China, in the days of Marco Polo, was centuries 
ahead of the other parts of the world with regard to the 
state of her civilization. But she had reached her peak 
and now, eyes cast backward, feasting on the glory of for- 
mer days, she slipped down into an unmolested slumber. 
No great new upsurge was destined to disturb her, forcing 
her on to greater efforts. Instead China slid quietly into 
a state of somnolence from which she did not recover. 
Only lately has she bestirred herself under the pressure of 
a threat from her erstwhile mate, Japan, and war is now 
purging the last signs of mediaeval feudalism from her 
soul. 

The Roman civilization is again different. It also rose 
to great new heights, being the glory of the western world. 
Falling into decay, its course of history did not follow 
China's. Instead barbarian hordes poured down from the 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 47 

north, burst the last walls and buttresses of the Roman 
Empire, smashed down the once proud legions and threw 
Europe into the Dark Ages. But soon the new virility of 
the barbarians, having no more wars to fight, was thrown 
into the advancement of man and his knowledge, taking 
from the monks and Mohammedans and adding new ideas. 
The Rebirth and Reformation were fruits of this new in- 
centive. The new nations and races, which took part in 
the partitioning of the Roman Empire, have lifted civiliza- 
tion up to a new high. War again has brought new and 
tremendous vitality into the struggle to advance civiliza- 
tion, sweeping aside the dregs of dust and decay. 

To-day. in this new series of World wars, one cannot 
help but feel that we are on the verge of a great new step 
forward. The industrial revolution has speeded up the ad- 
vance tremendously but it is still questionable whether we 
are to undergo another dark age before we achieve greater 
heights. Perhaps man can go ahead with the mere stimu- 
lus of a war; we can only wait and see. Until man has 
reached that point where he can avoid the rut of decay 
and corruptness, wars will occur to purge those evils from 
his system and to enable him to go onward with renewed 
vigour. Wars are the means by which civilization ad- 
vances. 

— D.H.R. 



ATTACK IN THE NIGHT 

Night had fallen, and through the curtain of darkness 
vague silhouettes of many ships could be discerned 
struggling forward through the inky seas. The omnipo- 
tent darkness was pierced only by a pin-point of light from 
some careless vessel. The resounding roar of the sea, the 
howi of the wind and the pounding of the waves was broken 
by the occasional hoot of a destroyer racing up and down 
the silent convoy like a watch-dog guarding its sheep. 

Suddenly the sea seemed to burst, followed by a 



48 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

frenzied upheaval of orange and yellow flame, and an ear- 
shattering explosion swept over the scene. The sea flew 
into a mass of dancing flame which, in its fury and like a 
last pyre, illuminated the surrounding scene of destruction 
and devastation. The convoy passed like a funeral pro- 
cession, seemingly unconscious while the wounded ship 
floundered and then resignedly settled to her fate, with 
greedy fingers of the sea stretched out to seize her. Over 
the angled sides of the doomed vessel tiny forms, like so 
many ants, struggled to escape the ever-tightening circle 
of flame. Lifeboats, filled with brave and wounded men, 
pulled slowly away from the blazing inferno, their gun- 
wales lapped by the black water. Others, tired of the 
stiTiggle, were claimed as victims of the sea. 

The struggle passed from view as the stricken tanker 
dipped below the waves, and once again the convoy headed 

into the night and uncertainty. 

— F.A.H.G. 



MENS SANA 



(Reprinted from The Trinity University Review) 

If you should ever feel the need to dance the highland fling 
Down Yonge Street, or further, feel called upon to sing 
During Othello's death-bed speech, if you ever wish to cling 
Affectionately to the nearest passerby — then go right 
ahead for goodness sake, or you'll get an inhibition. 

I'm healthy psychologically — should I hold my mother 

dear? 
Then Oedipus' sinister complex its ugly head would rear; 
Religion's simply hormones, or perhaps perverted fear; 
And I realize that a maid in love is in a highly undesirable 

glandular condition. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 49 

We know, my friends and I, the diseases that obsessed 
The minds of those called brilliant, and we have more than 

guessed 
At Burns' dipsomania, Keats' libido repressed, 
And we discern and healthily despise the inferiority com- 
plex that was Byron. 

It's fun to criticize the mental stature of those great — 
And I'm sure I'd be a genius if I were not free from hate — 
Who was wiser, Kant or Rousseau? Or do their I.Q.'s 

rate? 
Not only do we hold infinity in the palm of our hand, but 

we call it diseased and give it a number. 

And the daily fools around us show the sickness of their 

soul — 
Your neighbour watching smoke curl slowly upward from 

the bowl 
Of a well-lit pipe, or simply sitting staring at a coal 
Of a gently dying fire — why he's a pyromaniac as any 

psychologist can plainly see. 

We find betraying symbols in the language of such people. 
A peaceful sea's your mother, and it's clear a chimney 

sweep'll 
Symbolize a problem — we know the Meaning of a steeple; 
And we are furthermore willing to lay five to one that a 

spade's not a spade, it's your calculus professor. 

Our tools are hypnosis, suggestion, we eviscerate until 
When we've quite undressed your psyche, we can fashion 

her at will — 
Know the cause of blush or laughter, you can hope to cure 

the ill. 
Soon we'll perhaps be able to induce love by means of 

conditioned stimuli — and won't that be glorious? 

— R. E. Mackie ('40-'43) 



50 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

A SNOW STORM 

It had been a pleasant day — the warm rays of the sun 
had begun to pierce the snow on the ground and here and 
there small patches of grey, black and even a faint green 
could be seen. At mid-day, however, the sky lost its deep 
blue which was replaced by thick white billows of drifting 
fleece. Towards evening, heavy flakes of snow slanted 
down from a dull grey sky. The air remained warm but 
the sun no longer glittered on the window panes nor 
sparkled on the myriads of tiny snow crystals which lay 
peacefully at rest on winter's frosty fields and frozen 
roads. 

Slowly the breeze quickened until it became a biting 
wind, rising in gusts and chilling the air. It grew stronger 
and became more steady and piercing. The snow was 
whipped against the buildings and gaunt trees. Now it 
came not in large soft flakes but in tiny stinging pin points 
which numbed all who tried to stand against them. The 
wind moaned and whistled shrilly around the comers of 
the buildings and through the bare trees. A dead branch 
fell crashing to the ground and the sharp cracking was 
quickly swallowed in the shrieking of the gale. The wind 
rose in a final frenzy, slashing at young trees and cutting 
into the cold impassive bricks of the buildings. Then it 
died. 

Here and there were growing piles of deceiving, soft 
white snow. The bitter air lay calm upon the drifts and 
the frigid pin points ceased their headlong flight to earth. 
The only evidence of the onslaught just passed was the 
deep rolling drifts, the broken boughs and the now almost 
tangible silence which hung like a curtain over the bruised 
but beautiful landscape. 

— J.M.H. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 

TELEVISION 

Television could undoubtedly take the place of radio 
as a source of entertainment throughout the civilized 
world. Before this can take place, however, two great 
problems, which in turn cause countless other perplexities, 
have to be solved. The range of effective reception of a 
television set is no more than a sixty mile radius of the 
transmitting station, and though this may be overcome by 
sending the programme in relays, it is nevertheless quite 
a problem. A method was tried of sending the programme 
by wire but the cost of the line was prohibitive and the 
project dropped. The second problem is that of price. A 
television set now costs about four thousand dollars and 
owing to the skill required in the manufacture of the tubes 
and other parts, the price seems unlikely to drop unless 
methods of mass production are found. 

If a solution to these two problems is found, the tele- 
vision set will probably be hindered by the powerful motion 
picture industry which has everything to lose. With the 
aid of three or four television cameras and a special ap- 
paratus which televises movies, it is already possible to 
produce as good plays as any Hollywood director could 
hope to produce. The three cameras can televise the action 
in a studio and the movie televiser provides background 
and change of scene. It has even been possible, though 
very inefficiently as yet, to superimpose the actors in the 
studio upon any given background such as a mountain 
scene, a forest clearing or a city street. This is impossible 
to attain in a small set. 

Television is the result of man's efforts to imitate the 
human eye, and he has already improved on it in seme 
respects. Man has, from earliest times, tried to imitate 
nature, and though his final result is somewhat different 
from the object found in nature, the principle is virtually 
the same. 



52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

When light strikes the retina of the eye, it is con- 
verted into nervous impulses which are carried along 
mj^riads of nerve fibres and registered on the brain. Man 
has developed nothing approaching the scope and sensi- 
tivity of the human nerve, and in order to produce any 
sort of image he has had to turn to the photo-electric cell. 
A photo-electric cell may be compared to a flash-light bat- 
tery that will give a current only when exposed to some 
light, and that will give a current proportional to the bright- 
ness of that light. Very many substances have been found 
to give off a current resembling the imaginary flash-light 
battery and though this current is small, it is easily ampli- 
fied by means of vacuum tubes. The best photo-electric 
substance is selenium, which conducts an electric current 
about five million times as well in light as in total darkness. 

The first attempts at television were efforts to dupli- 
cate the human eye. A great many selenium cells formed 
the retina, and the current given off was recorded by an 
equal number of minute electric lamps, which correspond- 
ed to the brain. This idea was never successful owing to 
the number of cells, lamps and wires necessary to secure 
any image at all. 

Then several men began to search for a method by 
which the image could be cut up into small pieces and the 
light from only one piece at a time could be concentrated 
on a single photo-electric cell. Many systems were de- 
vised and, as they are almost all the same, the explanation 
of one will suffice. The process of cutting up the image 
is called scanning. In this system, which was devised by 
J. L. Baird in 1926, the scanning was accomplished by a 
disc rotated before a photo-electric cell. 

To understand the scanning disc one has to imagine, 
for example, a disc of cardboard. Close to the edge of 
this disc is a small round hole. Beside it is another about 
a quarter of an inch to the left and a quarter of an inch 
nearer the centre. These holes spiral toward the centre 
of the disc for one revolution. By means of this disc the 



T. C. S. BUILDINGS, PRESENT AND 
FUTURE 

On the following two pages will be found a 
plan of the present School buildings, together 
with additions proposed in the future. 

There are several schemes for new build- 
ings. The most ambitious Is to make the play- 
ing fields into a quadrangle enclosed by a row 
of houses for masters and boys along the west 
side, by the Junior School on the north, by the 
new Chapel and the present buildings on the 
east and south. 

It is hoped that the new Chapel will be com- 
menced very soon after peace is declared. 
The present Chapel would then be the Library. 
A covered rink may be built In the near future; 
it possibly would have been constructed In 



TRINITY COLLEGE SC 




T» TMt TOWN 



- rc*yiNC| »-««up>. - 



•5 PACE- 




■77"/ 
'future CHAPtU 
y/, OK. 

;^ASse/v\ai.Y WA*-^ 







1939-1940 had It not been for the outbreak of 
war. 

Another scheme is to make a smaller quad- 
rangle by the construction of a new house west 
of the present Trinity hlouse and north by an 
archway over the road. The new Chapel or 
an assembly hall would stand at the north end 
of this house, balancing the present dining 
hall. The north side of the quadrangle would 
be completed by enclosed cloisters, enabling 
boys to reach the Chapel under cover and 
without going through the houses. 

Additional playing fields can always be 
made from the fields south of the School. 

It is hoped that the printing of these plans 
will provoke interest; any suggestions will be 
gratefully received by the hleadmaster and 
published in future numbers of "The Record." 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 

image may be scamied. Each section of the scansion sets 
up an electric impulse in the photo-electric cell. So quick- 
ly is the scansion completed and the impulses sent out that 
when they are rearranged at the receiving station, the 
image appears on the screen as a coherent picture. In 
general, the receiving set is the sending set turned around. 
The disc at both ends must be revolving at precisely the 
same speed or the image blurrs. This is a further dif- 
ficulty. 

Despite these defects, such a system was television 
and could be broadcast. Baird had shown that it was pos- 
sible, and many men turned to the task of improvement. 
They were so successful that they produced a mechanical 
apparatus almost as efficient as the present system which 
relies entirely on radio tubes of various sorts, sizes and 
shapes. The most efficient mechanical system, in spite of 
all improvements, is bulky and has noisy, unreliable 
motors, an undesirable feature. 

The advantage of the new system over the old one is 
that it contains no moving parts which can go wrong and 
no motors to oil. It needs, being far more sensitive, half 
the light necessary for illuminating the image and it is 
therefore possible to take pictures outside. Events can be 
televised and seen while they happen. It is now possible 
by means of a special car to televise from anywhere within 
a radius of ten miles from the mother station. In the near 
future, in all probability, newsreels will be a thing of the 
past: one will be able to see battles while they are being 
fought and games while they are being played. The in- 
struments in a meteorological balloon will be televised, 
and one will be able to observe conditions at different 
levels with greater ease than is now possible. Life on the 
ocean floor will be seen at depths far greater than any 
diver can now go, and this device could help greatly in 
salvage work. 

The new system contains a camera tube which is 
focused much like a movie camera. In fact, the only dif- 



54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

ference between the two is that in the motion picture 
camera the film is moved and records a permanent image 
of the light which meets it, while the television camera 
contains a screen which registers light only while light is 
shining on it. This screen consists of very many photo- 
electric cells. The current from these cells is taken, one 
at a time, so that each cell on the first line gives up its 
charge, then each on the line below, and so on until the 
screen is completely uncharged. When this is accomplished, 
the process begins over again. The current from each cell 
can be seen to be proportional to the intensity of the light 
which strikes it; consequently, the current led off will be 
proportional to the light. The current can be transmitted 
much as the varying current from a microphone is broad- 
cast. 

When the signals are received they are converted in- 
to many lines of light of varying intensity, much as a news- 
paper photograph consists of many dots of different 
shades of grey. These lines are formed with such speed 
that the eye sees them as one single image. As it is de- 
scribed here it may seem to be very simple. In actual 
practice it is one of the most complicated devices man has 
discovered. Further, it is the result of the patient re- 
search of many who persevered for years on end, refusing 
to be discouraged by repeated failures. Now, finally, they 
have attained some success. 

We know it is possible to record sound on gramaphone 
records. It is now possible to record light in the same 
way. Even more, the same record can give sound and 
light. Probably in the next few years it will be possible 
to buy records with a double track, so that you can hear 
as well as see, on your television-phonograph set. the play- 
ing of a symphony or the singing of a popular song. 

-H.A.L. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 

"D" DAY 

The following description was contained in a letter 
from Lieut. Jim Warburton ('34-'39), R.C.A.:— 

"After a few more idyllic weeks of glorious weather, 
visits to the Thatched Cottage and hectic preparation for 
the big do, which we realized was not far off, we were 
sealed into our camp. Barbed wire was thrown around 
us. guards put on and no one allowed in or out. Then the 
Officers were briefed — a whole day's work. I'll never for- 
get the thrill I felt as the CO. told us what we were to do, 
how we were going to do it and of the magnitude of the 
operation. Then we studied maps and aerial photos and 
intelligence summaries till we knew the job cold. When 
the day was over I knew almost every house in the village 
we landed in and exactly where I was to go, how to get 
there and what to do. It was a marvellous feeling to be 
so familiar with the place. 

"A few more days of waiting followed, when we were 
issued francs, got rid of all excess baggage and administer- 
ed our craft load. I was O.C. troops on my craft, and had 
a Major and a couple of Captains under me, so things might 
have been a bit tricky except that they were all very de- 
cent and we got on famously. Then down to the yards 
to load, and a wait of several days on the craft, the hold 
jam-packed with vehicles and no room for all the men. 
However, they did everything possible to make us com- 
fortable and we survived the boredom. 

"Not knowing when "D" Day was, there was great 
speculation as to the date. We got one rumour, but that 
day slipped by and the weather seemed to be getting worse; 
I began to be anxious, knowing that a delay would mean 
a postponement of anything up to 28 days, and I couldn't 
face being sealed in that much longer. However, one 
bright day we steamed out past the most amazing collec- 
tion of shipping I'll probably ever see, through the boom 
and out into the Channel. The way the boat turned and 



56 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

tossed I thought even then we'd have to turn back, but on 
we went and I felt worse and worse. Fortunately I had 
something to do, and between trips to the rail I sorted 
maps, briefed the troops and got things ready for the 
morrow. Having got everything ready, I managed to get 
some sleep, which I now thank my lucky stars I took. 

"A rather eerie crossing, as we couldn't show light; 
the seas were so high for such craft; and we knew there 
might be "E" boats and subs around. However, our faith 
in the Navy was not misplaced and there were no incidents 
on the way over. 

"Up early in the morning to find low clouds and a grey 
light and few ships. However, they soon began to gather, 
and soon there were as many around us as we'd passed 
the night before. The miracle was the Hun didn't seem to 
expect us, and there was no enemy activity at all that 
stage. 

"The forming up, the run in, the wait, the beaching — 
off the beaches to find everything as we'd expected, and 
so into our first position. 

"We sailed inshore, hitting a mine on the way, but that 
didn't stop us. We were also being shelled and bombed 
but, beyond noticing the spouts of water around us, I 
didn't have time to think about it. So we landed, and 
pushed inland, firing from one position for awhile before 
moving on to another. It was kind of nerve racking, be- 
cause all the places had not been cleaned out, and we 
weren't quite sure when a sniper would get after us. Then 
our first night ashore — pretty tough. The first Jerry 
planes started coming over at dusk, and our ack-ack was 
terrific, really the worst part of the thing. However, most 
of us got a little sleep that night. I was so dog-tired I 
couldn't stay awake and just dropped off in a most peculiar 
position up against the bogies of the tank. 

"By the next day things were beginning to settle down, 
and though we did a lot of firing and the Hun counter- 
attacked quite a lot, we stayed in the position we'd occupied 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



57 



that day for several days. We had a Jerry strong point 
at our back. On a hill about 1000 yards across a valley 
and completely overlooking my troop was a very strongly 
fortified position; why he never bothered us I don't know. 
A couple of tanks went up to have a look-see, and he en- 
gaged them. We even did a bit of shooting of what amount- 
ed to direct laying — about the best fun we've had so far. 
It's a great thing to be able to see what you're shooting 
at, and the gunners very rarely get that opportunity. 

"You ought to see our air support. It's magnificent, 
and we get a great thrill watching the Typhoons rocket- 
bombing. They just queue up in the sky and go diving 
in, then you see a couple of flashes and a tail of smoke as 
two rockets head for the ground. Heavy bombers came 
over one day, too, and the mess they made of their targets 
was unbelievable. 

"Everything is going pretty nicely, and we're not 
having a bad time, though occasionally we get shaken up 
by a bit of shelling " 




^^Blr 



58 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




orr the: 

flECOKD 



COULD YOU IMAGINE? 

Howard — smolmig. 

French i — shaving. 

Huycke i — cleaning his shoes. 

Irwin — losing an argument. 

Hope — silent. 

Cox i — not in love. 

Allen — awake. 

Austin i — in the clergy. 

Robarts — organized. 

Gilbert — slim. 

Huycke ii — on time. 

Roenisch — failing. 

Pearson i — excited. 

Butterfield i — in a bow tie. 

Gibson ii — with a new set of uppers. 

Hallward — base drummer in the band. 

Bovaird — not with the latest. 

Decker — not complaining. 

Dobell i — with a crew cut. 

Mclntyre i — not with Wade. 

Wade — not with Mclntyre. 

McMurrich — not annoyed by Wade and Mclntyre. 

Greig — without a pipe. 

Dawson — with his hair not gfreased. 

Lawson — calm. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 59 

You Can't AfFORD to Miss This! 

or 

Up Your ALLEY 

A large sized WHITE BIRD, probably a HAWKE. 
spotted a CROWE with a RAY of HOPE. The CROWE 
saw the HAWKE CUMMING and dove down into some 
WOODS where HARRY used to HYDE and TOMMY liked 
to WADE on the BANKS of the BROOKS near a glade 
called GREENWOOD. A SMITHy at that moment, in a 
double-DECKER BLACK AUSTIN, was FORDing the 
stream on the STONEs. Apparently he had been RID- 
DELLed in his leg for he DALLEYed quite LONG, and 
seemed in PAYNE. Some FISHER, a FRENCHman, had 
KETCHUM stealmg fish hung by the GILLs on some 
BARNES near a small WHITFIELD which was a HAR- 
DAKER of land where same LAMBs were playing. The 
GAUNT and haggard SMITHy, his TAYLORed suit rip- 
ped to shreds, had a WHITEHEAD and a LONG cigar, and 
as he heard DOBELL in a village he knew that he DREW 
close to a populated area. A MERRY BAKER, WARNERed 
by instinct that the SMITHy was in danger, came SCOTT- 
free to the rescue of the wounded man, unaware that his 
invention of a NEWCOMB was being stolen. The robber 
was as small as a HARE and in ARMOUR. The BAKER 
HUYCKEd several miles to the rescue, down a MAIN 
ALLEY of trees, taking CURRIE to eat and Tom COL- 
LINS to drink. When he arrived, the BAKER said to the 
SMITHy "Good EVANS! let me help you home". WELLS, 
the rest some TOOLE can figure out any DAY. 

— P.L.E.G. 



One lateness! — hard lines. 



In Physics class, Mr. Lewis spends most of his time 
talking about de-tension. 



60 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

OCTOBER 31 

The surface of the water gleams brightly with the 
steadily thickening coat of greenish red. An air of ten- 
sion hangs over the scene. Suddenly a curt order is 
given, and amidst heart-rending screams, human bodies 
hurtle into the foam. Fighting their way to the surface, 
the victims become a twisting, writhing, seething, splut- 
tering mass of arms, legs and heads. The shiny substance 
fills their grasping mouths and, as they scramble des- 
perately for safety, the onlookers jeer mockingly from 
above, amused by the ghastly spectacle. Gradually the 
ferocity of the scene diminishes; and finally, when the un- 
fortunate victims seem at their last gasp, another sharp 
command is given and they are dragged to safety. 

After an ominous silence, a man steps forward and 
announces, "Brent wins, 270 apples to 269". 

— T.W.L. 



Mr. Scott keeps us up with the sines of the times. 



DOTING RELATIONS 

Darling child, so sweet and fair, 
Eyes of blue, and golden hair. 
Cherubic mouth and wistful smile, ^ 
Countenance devoid of guile. 

Raptured friends and cooing kin, 
Gather round the baby pen, 
"Dear, dear boy — he's so like me — 
Really, don't you all agree?" 

"Well, frankly no, Castoria dear. 
He's Auntie's nose, and Grandpa's ears, 
His smile is quite like mine, I'd say. 
His mouth, of course, belongs to May." 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 61 

Hands like Bertie, feet like Grace, 
A trace of Horace in his face, 
Neck like Wilbur, hair like Jeb, 
Toes like Granny's (see the web) ; 

Filbert's manners. Aunt Jo's grace. 
Of Lucifer there's just a trace. 
And so, the darling child of three. 
Gets the well-known third degree. 

But, strange, the cherub tires of all, 
Stands, and heaves a lusty squall. 
Throws a boot at great-aunt Min 
And kicks at cousin Henry's shin; 

Wallops Grandpa with a toy 
Amid wild screams of fiendish joy; 
Clutches buttons, watches, chains 
And stamps upon his ill-got gains. 

Admiring friends, relations too, 
Turn a lovely shade of blue, 
Stop their praises, turn their view, 
And, "After all. he's most like you!" 

— J.H.C 



Ejiowledge is locked in the subjects we take here. 
T.C.S. meets this exigency by supplying a master Key. 

***** 

Bethune house isn't exactly a municipality but we 
have a Maier of de Burg. 

***** 

"If you E.R. (r), Bagley, you are gwynne to die". 

— 1st. Book of Timothy. 



62 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




HOCKEY 

With the change in season comes a complete change 
of sport. Hockey moves into the picture as the leading 
game while basketball, gym, swimming and squash also 
take their places. 

The First Hockey Team has started off its schedule 
with a very successful record. They have won their first 
seven games and finished on top of their group of the 
O.M.H.A. Juvenile "B" series with Bowmanville, Cobourg, 
and Port Hope. They have advanced into further play- 
offs with other juvenile teams in the league, the winners 
to be the Ontario champions. Aside from their league con- 
tests, exhibition games are being played with Lakefield, 
U.C.C., Pickering and Ridley. There are six old colours 
on this year's team, and their previous practice together is 
producing a smart combination. Huycke i has been elected 
Captain, and Dobell i Vice-Captain. 

Middleside is not entered in any league, but exhibition 
games have been played with Upper Canada and Lakefield, 
and it is hoped that others will be arranged in the near 
future. Bird has been elected Captain and Hawke i Vice- 
Captain. 

Littleside has been divided into two leagues and each 
team plays several times a week. They thus receive con- 
siderable practice and undoubtedly some of the experience 
needed to play on Bigside or Middleside will be gained by 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 63 

this plan. Games have been played with Port Hope, 
Lakefield, and U.C.C. Wells has been elected Captain and 
Newcomb Vice-Captain. 

— E.McC.S. 



SCHOOL v^. PORT HOPE 
At Port Hope, January 23: Won 13-4 

In their opening game, the T.C.S. First Hockey Team, 
showing good combination on the forward lines and excel- 
lent defensive play, overwhelmed the Port Hope Ontarios 
13-4. Paced by Dobell and McMurrich with three goals 
each, the School dominated the play except for a second 
period lapse during which three Port Hope goals were 
scored. 

Both teams started slowly but the pace soon quickened. 
T.C.S. had a slight edge in the play, but Naylor, in the 
Port Hope nets, kept them from scoring until McMurrich 
finally rapped home a rebounded shot from Sinclair. In- 
spired by a one goal lead. T.C.S. forced the play for the 
remainder of the period, with Gilbert scoring twice and 
McMurrich a second time to give them a 4-0 lead at the 
end of the period. 

The School started fast in the second period with 
Howard scoring on a hard shot from the blue line in the 
opening moments. Dobell made it 6-0 when he scored 
from McMurrich's rebound. At this point, the Port Hope 
goaler, Naylor, was injured and had to be replaced by 
Burley. The game began to get faster with Port Hope 
threatening, but good defensive work by the School re- 
pelled their attacks. Port Hope continued to press, how- 
ever, and Lewis finally scored on a semi-breakaway dur- 
ing a T.C.S. attack. The Trinity aggressiveness slackened 
after this, and Hunt scored twice more for Port Hope, 
showing very tricky stick-handling. 

The School came to life in the final period, outscoring 
their opponents 7-1. McMurrich bagged his third goal of 
the evening on a long, low shot and Dobell scored during 



64 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

a mix-up around the Port Hope goal. Huycke got two in 
a row on lovely shots from just inside the blue line. Two 
more goals were scored while the School was short-handed. 
Sinclair getting the first from Dobell, and the latter get- 
ting the second on a breakaway. Robarts scored the nnal 
goal of the game on a perfect passing play from Roenisch 
and Gilbert. Port Hope's lone tally came mid-way through 
the period with Lewis scoring on a ganging attack. 

Although the T.C.S. forwards played fast and aggres- 
sive hockey, with good passmg, it was the defence .vho 
starred during the game. Both Howard and Huycke play- 
ed an excellent brand of hockey throughout, breaking up 
many a dangerous rush by the plucky, but out-played Port 
Hope team. Hunt was the star for the losers with two 
goals, threatening time and again to break through the 
T.C.S. defence. 

Port Hope— Goal, Naylor; defence, Currelly, Lewis; centre, 
Hunt; wings, Sidey, S. Dotzko. Alternates: Burley, B. Dotzko, 
Ashby, Churchley, Pollard, Mark, Abrama. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Fennell; defence, Huycke 1, Howard; centre, Do- 
bell i; wings, McMurrich, Sinclair. Alternates: Dawson, Davidson, 
Pearson i, Robarts, Gilbert, Roenisch. 



SCHOOL vs. COBOURG 
At Cobourg, Januajry 26: Won 8-4. 

T.C.S. won their second game in two starts by defeat- 
ing a hard-skating Cobourg team 8-4. Although scrambly 
in places, both teams showed excellent passing and it was 
only the superior close-in play of the Trinity forwards 
which decided the game. 

The first period opened with a School drive to the 
Cobourg end where, after two minutes of scrambly play, 
McMurrich flicked Dobell's pass into the nets. For the 
next ten minutes play remained even, until Dobell took 
Sinclair's pass close in and made the score 2-0 for Trinity. 
Cobourg then pressed hard, and for the remainder of the 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 65 

period had the balance of the play, but were unable to beat 
Dawson in the School nets. 

The second period saw a continuance of Cobourg's 
drive and, while Howard was serving a penalty, Hogan 
scored on a scramble to make the score 2-1. The School 
came back when McMurrich scored from Sinclair, but 
Elliot beat Dawson on a hard shot two minutes later to 
make the score 3-2, The play, although rough, remained 
even, the line of Gilbert, Robarts and Roenisch working- 
well for Trinity. McMurrich soon added another, however, 
when he backhanded Sinclair's pass from in front of the 
net. Play was again even, the Cobourg goalie making 
beautiful saves, until Sinclair beat him on a lovely play 
from McMurrich and Dobell. 

Two minutes after the final period opened, Hogan beat 
Dawson on a breakaway to make the score 5-3, Cobourg 
then pressed hard and only the excellent play of Dawson 
kept them from scoring. McMurrich, however, took the 
School out of danger again when he scored from Dobell on 
a breakaway. Trinity took advantage of a Cobourg 
penalty, when Sinclair made the score 7-3 on a break from 
Dobell. Cobourg pressed hard, but Sinclair scored again 
on a combination from Dobell and McMurrich, With but 
fifteen seconds to go, Monroe scored on another break- 
away, to make the final score 8-4. 

The play was hard and fast with neither team able to 
keep the edge, while both goalies spoiled many excellent 
scoring chances. The rushing of Howard and Huycke on 
defence took the School out of danger many times, while 
the line of Dobell, McMurrich and Sinclair showed very 
good passing and scored all the points. Starring were Daw- 
son. McMurrich and Sinclair, 

CX>bourg — Goal, Hoselton; defence, Shorey, McMillan; wings, 
Goody, Elliot. Alternates: Smith, Jamieson, Bulger, Hogan, Flesch, 
Monroe. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Howard, Huycke; centre, Dobell; 
wings. McMurrich, Sinclair. Alternates: Gilbert, Robarts, Roenisch, 
Davidson, Bird, Fennell. 



66 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

MIDDLESIDE 

SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Port Mope, January 27: Lost 2-0. 

This was the first game of the season for Middleside, 
and although they were beaten 2-0 by a stronger team, 
they put up an excellent showing. 

In the early part of the first period the play was very 
close, with Bird showing some good stick-handling for the 
School and Pringle driving hard at the T.C.S. goal. Play 
remained even for the remainder of the period with the 
exception of one brilliant rush by Campbell and two break- 
aways by Kent of U.C.C. 

U.C.C. had the upper hand for most of the second 
period as their passes were clicking. Those of the School, 
on the other hand, were continually going wide so that 
the puck stayed at the T.C.S. end. U.C.C. kept missing 
until Morphy scored on a pass from Kent. During this 
period both Fennell for the School and Orr for U.C.C. 
played exceptionally well in goal. 

The last period brought U.C.C. their second goal when 
Ball countered with Chisholm assisting. Hewitt played 
well for U.C.C. and twice would have scored but for Fen- 
nell. Bird and Lambert were best for the School, saving 
many of Upper Canada's threats and trying vainly to beat 
Orr and even the score. 

U.C.C. — Murphy, Orr, McLeod, Pringle, Kent, Frame, Hewitt, 
Chiaholm, Ball, Field. 

T.C.S. — 'Bird, Fennell, Fisher, Lajnbert, Long, Dobson, Mac- 
donald, Lawson, Campbell i, Currie, Taylor ii, Hawke i, French li 



LITTLESIDE 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Port Hope, January 27: Lost 7-1. 

In their first game of the season, Littleside played well 
but lost to U.C.C. by a score of 7-1. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 67 

In the first period Bazor opened the scoring for U.C.C. 
on a very long shot from the blue line. Gill, however, 
soon scored for T.C.S. on a pass from Rogers. U.C.C. then 
ran wild, and by the end of the second period they had 
tallied four more, with Stewart, Rennie and Bazor as the 
goal-getters. In the last period U.C.C. outshot the T.C.S. 
team considerably, and Goodbody made many excellent 
stops in the School's nets. However, Masters and Cork 
were able to net one each to make the final score 7-1. 

For the College, Bazor, Cork and Masters were the 
best, and for T.C.S., Gill and Goodbody played well. 

U.C.C. — Kings, Cork, Backly, Todd, Kennedy, Rennie, Bazor, 
Bethune, Stewart, Harqraphy, Wardrops, Masters. 

T.O.S. — Goodbody, Brewer, Dobell li, Jarvis, Bronfman, Gaunt, 
Brooks, Newcomb, Rogers, Gill, Cumming. 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. COBOURG 
At Cobourg, Januarj- 24: Lost 7-4. 

In their first game of the season, Littleside "B" were 
defeated by Cobourg 7-4. The School was leading in the 
third period 4-3 and it was not until the very end that 
Cobourg managed to get the winning goals. 

T.C.S., on a shot from the boards by Black, got the 
first goal, but Cobourg tied it up almost immediately on a 
shot from Campbell. In the second period Kingman and 
McPherson each got a goal for T.C.S., but Cobourg again 
equalized the score with goals by Campbell and Medhurst. 
Black got his second goal of the evening in the opening 
minutes of the third period. A few minutes later, how- 
ever, while McLennan was serving a penalty, Cobourg 
scored two goals in quick succession. Two more followed, 
and the game ended with T.C.S. feverishly trying to tie the 
score. 

Individually the School was better than their op- 
ponents, but they lacked co-operation. For Cobourg, Camp- 
bell and Medhurst starred while the School's best were 
Black, McPherson, Deverall and McLennan. 



68 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL KECORD 

Cobourg — Noble, Shaw, Flesch, Campbell, Bowen, Goody, Wil- 
cox, Medhurst, Hessin, Jamison, Black, Hellis. 

T.C.S. — Pratt, Deverall, McLennan, Tessier, Black, McPherson, 
Kingman, Hawke ii, Paterson ii, Dmmmond. 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. LAKJEFIELD 

At Port Hope, January 31: Lost 9-5. 

Littleside "B" dropped its second game of the season 
to Lakefield by the score of 9-5. Both teams played well 
but the second period rally by Lakefield turned the trick. 

T.C.S. started well when Kingman put them one up 
in the first period. Kingman notched another early in the 
second period, but the superior play of the Lakefield for- 
wards proved to be too much and at the end of the period 
the School was trailing 6-2. Gierson, Bums, McCulloch, 
Wilkes and Arnoldi were the Grove marksmen. The third 
period was featured by close play, and each team scored 
three times. McPherson scored twice and Kingman once 
for T.C.S. while Wilkes collected all three for Lakefield. 

Kingman and McPherson played well for the School 
and Wilkes shone for the Grove. 

Lakefield — Ketchum, Morch, Gibson, Wailling, Head, Amoldi, 
McCulloch, Gierson, Burns, Wilkes, Easson. 

T.C.S. — dePencier, Deverall, McLennan, Brodeur, Black, Mc- 
Pherson, Kingman, Paterson ii, Brooks, Dnimmond. 




1I5!\ 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 69 




keTb 



DasKei Da 




Bigside Basketball is playing in a senior C.O.S.S.A. 
league with other teams from this district and will there- 
fore have many games. Three old colours have returned 
and a strong team is looked for. French i has been elect- 
ed Captain and Toole Vice-Captain. 

A Junior basketball squad has been formed and it has 
again entered a C.O.S.S.A. junior league. 



SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH COLLEGIATE 
At Peterborough, January 19: Won 22-18 

In the opening game of the season, Trinity College 
School's first Basketball team defeated Peterborough Col- 
legiate, 22-18. Despite less than a week's practice, T.C.S. 
played a fine game and deserved to win. 

The first half started slowly, neither team taking any 
chances. Then the School jumped into an early lead which 
held throughout the game. Carhartt sank three from 
under the basket while Drew, French and "Warner added 
one each to make the half-time score 13-8. 

Peterborough rapidly cut down Trinity's lead at the 
start of the second half, and as a result the game became 
wild and scrambly. At three-quarter time the score stood 
16-15 for T.C.S. The last period settled down to excellent 
basketball, Peterborough vainly trying to crack Trinity's 



70 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

defence, while the School took advantage of every break to 
make the final score 22-18 m their favour. 

For T.C.S. French i, Toole and Drew played well, but 
it was their zone defence which contributed mainly to the 
victory. Rooke, Estlick and Courtney were the best for 
the losers. 

Peterborough.^ — ^Brown, Courtney, Estlick, Lee, Plunket, Rooke, 
Thompson, Whittaker. 

T.C.S. — French, Toole, Wade, Drew, Carhartt, Warner, Edmonds. 



SCHOOL vs. rORT HOPE 
At Port Hope, January 27: Won 51-46. 

The School won its first league game, defeating Port 
Hope High School 51-46. The game, considering the small 
fioor, was wide open and many good plays were set up by 
both teams. 

In the opening quarter play was slow and scrainbly 
with few effective efforts being made by either team. Port 
Hope outscored the School 10-8. By the second quarter 
the School had begun to untrack, and although their plays 
were still scrambly they were accurate enough under the 
basket to put themselves in front 22-20 at half time. 

The third quarter was a repetition of the second with 
very close checking, each team collecting eight points; but 
the School really opened up in the last quarter and looked 
like a first class basketball team. They ran up a lead of 
twelve points but then allowed Port Hope to narrow it 
down to five in the dying minutes of the game. 

French was the best player on the floor, accounting 
for nineteen of the School's fifty-one points. Toole played 
a very good defensive game as well as figuring in many of 
the plays. Watson was the best for Port Hope, chalking 
up twenty-four points, and Bosnell also played well. 

port Hope — Currelly, White, Bosnell, Watson, Hodgson, Bisset. 

T.C.S. P'rench i, Toole, Carhartt, Hare, Edmonds, Drew, Wade, 
Ligertwood, Warner, Taylor 1. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 71 

SCHOOL vs. OOBOURG 
At Port Hone, Januar> 31: Won 57-42. 

The School chalked up its third straight win by beat- 
ing Cobourg 57-42. Featured were the close checking of 
both teams and the good zone defences used throughout 
the game. Cobourg showed some very fine, fast breaks. 
but they seemed to lose control of the play in the School's 
end too quickly. T.C.S. first began very scrambly and were 
slow making their breaks, but by the end of the game they 
were working the ball around very well and effectively 
carried the play. 

The first quarter was ragged with Cobourg carrying 
the play to a lead of 13-7. The School came to life in the 
second quarter and they missed very few opportunities to 
score. Cobourg made many fast breaks but they were 
careless under the School's basket, and at half-time the 
School led 30-27. 

The game opened up in the next quarter and the School 
outscored Cobourg handily, leading at the end of the period 
45-35. T.C.S. added twelve points in the last quarter and 
managed to hold Cobourg to seven. Score at full time 
was 57-42 for T.C.S. 

The outstanding player of the game was Drew of 
T.C.S. He amassed a total of thirty-two points as well as 
setting up many other baskets for his team-mates. Ander- 
son of Cobourg and French i of T.C.S. were the other 
standouts. 

Cobourg— Anderson, Ball, Curtis, McMillan, Hoselton, Quigley, 
BigTvin, Erskine. 

T.C.S.— French 1, Drew, Carhartt, Wade, Warner, Ligertwood, 
Taylor i, Hibbard, Edmonds, Hare. 



72 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

THE NEW BOYS' BOXING COMPETITION 

December 4-9 

The New Boys' Competition this year was closely and 
keenly contested. A good entry and some talented boxers 
made it a very interesting tournament. Gumming, Deverall 
and Hughes tied for top place, each gaining 7.3 points to- 
wards the Magee Cup. Armour ii received three points 
and Hall one. 

The results were as follows: — 

Paperweight 

First Round — Macklem beat Drummond; Prentice 
beat Morgan ii; McPherson beat Welsford; Armour ii beat 
Stone. 

Semi-Finals — Macklem beat Prentice; Armour ii beat 
McPherson. 

Finals — Armour ii beat Macklem. 

Flyueight 

First Round — Deverall beat Black ; Black beat Woods. 
Semi-Finals — Deverall beat Scott ii; Morris beat 
Black. 

Finals — Deverall beat Morris. 

Bantamweight 

First Round — Cumming beat Brooks; McLennan 
beat de Pencier. 

Semi-Finals — Cumming beat McLennan; Newcomb 
beat Morgan i. 

Finals — Cumming beat Newcomb. 

Bantamweight (over age) 

First Round — Gaunt beat Luke; Wells beat Wilson ii. 
Finals — Gaunt beat Wells. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 73 

Featherweight 

First Round — Hughes beat Johnston; Emery beat 
Spencer. 

Finals — Hughes beat Emery. 

Featherweight (over age) 

First Round — Wismer beat Tanner. 
Finals — Beattie beat Wismer. 

Lightweight (over age) 

First Round — Bronfman beat Caldbick; Whitehead 
beat Pangman. 

Semi-Finals — Whitehead beat Bronfman; Ray beat 
Rogers. 

Finals — Whitehead beat Ray. 

Welterweight 

First Round — Hall beat Barnes; Pilcher beat Harley. 
Finals — Hall beat Pilcher. 

Weltenveight (over age) 

First Round — Bermingham beat Harley. 
Semi-Finals — Bermingham beat Bowles; Langdon beat 
Pennell. 

Finals — Langdon beat Bermingham. 

Middleweight 

Finals — Mclntyre ii beat Alley. 



NEW BOYS' GYM. COMPETITION 

January 19 

The New Boys' Gym. Competition was postponed un- 
til the Lent term and a better showing resulted. Gumming 
led the group and earned ten more points towards the 



74 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Magee Cup. Deverall was second and Gaunt third. 

Name % Magee Cup Points 

1. Cumming 91.5 10 

2. Deverall 86.5 7 

3. Gaunt 85.5 over age 

4. Bermingham 85.0 over age 

5. Brodeur 84.5 5 

6. Williamson 79.5 3 

7. Welsford 76.5 2 



THE MAGEE CUP 



The Magee Cup Competition developed into a close 
race between Gumming and Deverall, with the former 
finally winning although they both did excellently in all 
three fields. The Cup returns to Brent House. 

Complete totals for the Magee Cup read as follows: — 

Race Boxing Gym. Total 

Cumming 10 7.3 10 27.3 

Deverall 7 7.3 7 21.3 

Hughes 2 7.3 — 9.3 

Black 5 _ _ 5 

Brodeur — — 5 5 

MacLean — 3 — 3 

Paterson iii 3 — — 3 

Williamson — — 3 3 

Hall _ 2 — 2 

Welsford _ _ 2 2 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



75 



LITTLE BIG FOUR ALL-STAR TEAM 

The following is the Little Big Four All-Star Football 
team for 1944 as chosen by the four competing schools: — 

Snap Beatty U.C.C. 

Inside ^acLachlan B.R.C. 

Inside ; Baylor S.A.C. 

Middle Jlobinson S.A.C. 

Middle J'lemming S.A.C. 

Outside JVIcIntyr« T.C.S. 

Outside .^arbour B.R.C. 

Quarterback McFarlane B.R.C. 

Sinclair T.C.S. 

Flying Wing „..«Fisher B.R.C. 

Halfback JIuycke T.C.S. 

Halfback Shields B.R.C. 

Halfback -J)avis B.R.C. 

Kennedy S.A.C. 




76 



TRINITY COLirEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




Editor-in-Chief M. E. Wright 

Assistants D. A. Chester, T. G. R. Brinckman, 

P. T. Macklem, P. B. Mackenzie. 

So far this term, nobody can complain of a lack of 
winter conditions — ice and snow are to be had for the 
asking. 

The J. S. has had three very successful skiing trips to 
the Golf Club to date and we hope to have several more 
More boys than ever seem to own skis and there are quite 
a few very useful performers. 

The J.S. choir is to be congratulated for its excellent 
work in the Carol Service this year. Both Thompson i and 
Ketchum i acquitted themselves very well in their solos. 

This year, for the first time in the history of the 
Junior School, the Christmas dinner was held in our own 
dining hall. In previous years we had always enjoyed 
joining with the Senior School, but the greatly increased 
numbers made it impossible this year. To begin the pro- 
ceedings the Choir processed around the hall carrying 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 77 

lighted candles and singing carols. A presentation was 
later made to Miss Smith by the Stamp Club. After 
dinner, movies were shown in the classroom block. 

Our sincere thanks to Mrs. E. McPherson for a gift 
of football equipment and also to Howard. Bovaird and 
Britton for gifts of football equipment and First Team 
sweaters. 

We wish David Foster and Bill Mathews a safe return 
to England and the very best of luck in their new schools. 



THE STAMP CLUB 



The Stamp Club has been going for quite a number of 
years now and has come to be a very definite part of the 
J.S. Sunday morning routine. It was started and run by 
Miss Smith, who is probably responsible for many boys 
from the School taking up this interesting hobby. She 
always seemed to have lots of "traders" and stamps given 
by her have covered the first pages of many an album. We 
shall miss the knock at the door on Sunday morning with 
the unvarying question "Is Miss Smith, the Stamp Sir, 
here yet?" We shall also miss her unfailing interest in 
the J.S. and her willing help on so many occasions. All 
of us at the Junior School wish her the very best of luck 
and many years of well-earned rest and happiness. 



ATHLETICS 

Hockey 



Captain of Hockey N. F. Thompson 

Vice-Captain J. F. D. Boulden 

Captain of the 2nd Team R. M. Hogarth 

With several old colours back and some good new 
material, the prospects for the Hockey Team look quite 
promising. The School has been divided into three sides 
and everybody has been getting lots of hockey. Games 
have been arranged with Lakefield, U.C.C. and Ridley. 



78 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Intra-Mural Soccer 

The weather did not permit us to finish out the second 
round of the Soccer League, so the pennant has been 
awarded on the standing of the teams at the end of the 
first round. 

1. Navy (Capt., Boulden) 9 points 

2. Commandos, (Capt., Thompson ii) 7 

3. Tanks (Capt., Thompson i) 5 

R.A.F. (Capt., Wyman i) 5 

4. Army (Capt., Dignam i) 4 

5. Marines (Capt., Hughes) 1 

Navy Team — Boulden (Capt.), Tessier, Southam. Gra- 
ham, Peters, Stratford, Bate, McGill, Carr-Harris, Weicker, 
FitzGerald, Kelk. 



THE SHEEP 



The lambs are frisking in my sight, 
The lambs are frisking day and night, 
And when I see them all at play, 
It's pleasant on a summer's day. 

In winter they go into pens 

And all get chummy with the hens. 

A shepherd keeps them in his sight 

And guards them from nearly every plight. 

The shepherd lives in a house on wheels; 
I never can tell what he feels. 
His house is very nice inside — 
He's fond of it and it's his pride. 

The little lambs have mothers, too, 
Who tell their children what to do; 
That when the sheep go to be sheared 
There is nothing to be feared. 

— Alan Munro, Form I 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 79 

EXPLOITS OF A PRIVATE DICK 

"Beefy" Brown (avoirdupois 283) had never been 
much good at anything. His glorious career as an errand 
boy — fired, garbage man — fired, moving man — collapsed 
under piano and quit, had left him with about five dollars 
to his name. Now, alas, he was without a job; Beefy was 
practically penniless and he knew that he would have to 
find a job or starve. He settled down in an easy ( ?) chair 
in his cheap little attic room and dug his nose into a de- 
tective story. The one in question, "The Case of the 
Missing Torso", was about a young private detective who 
found a pair of luscious legs in a bathtub, but couldn't find 
the rest of the body. He discovered and captured the 
killers, trying to take the rest of the body out of the ice- 
box, and became famous overnight. Slowly a great idea 
dawTied on our hero. Why not? 

Next day found him established in an office, on a loan 
of twenty-five dollars, with the legend "Bill Brown, Private 
Detective" on glazed glass on the door. Very soon he had 
his first client. A small nervous man knocked on the door, 
which promptly collapsed. The tiny fellow faltered and 
then rapped on Beefy's desk for attention. The desk 
crumbled onto the floor and Beefy, who had been asleep, 
woke up. The visitor uttered three words — "They're after 
me!" A shot rang out and he fell dead at the detective's 
feet. Just then three men walked into the room, one with 
a smoking revolver in his hand. 

"So he squealed, eh?" asked the man with the gun. 

"And told ja about our diamond smugglin' racket, 
huh?" said the second man. 

"Which shouldn't worry him anyway," growled the 
third, " 'cause he's just the customs chief." 

"Waal, were gonna havta bump youse off as well 
now," said the first man again, "seein' as he told ja the 
woiks." 

They forced Beefy out of the window and onto the fire 
escape. About half way down Beefy stepped on a weak 



80 TRINITY COLUEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

section and the four men fell down two floors onto the 
pavement. Dazed and bruised, two of the gangsters got 
to their feet. One lay still — he had landed with Beefy on 
top of him and looked like chicken paste. Covered by the 
leader's gun, Beefy got up. They walked across the road 
and climbed into the usual sleek, black limousine. Beefy 
was being taken for a ride! 

About half an hour later the car arrived out in the 
country and stopped on a deserted by-road. The first man 
got out and tripped on the running board. Our hero, fol- 
lowing close behind, stepped on his head and killed him 
instantly, but messily. Beefy apologized profusely and 
received a bullet in the arm from the surviving gangsters. 
Angered, the lumbering giant's huge hand swung around 
and mashed the surviving gangster's head horribly. Beefy 
piled in the body and drove to the police station. In the 
pocket of the front seat were found complete plans of a 
smuggling organization and the names of every man con- 
cerned. 

Our hero became very famous and did many more 
valiant deeds in his life. At last he was good at some- 
thing. 

— Brinckman i, IIAI 



MISTAKEN IDENTITY 

"Grood-bye, boys," cried Mrs. Bermingham, as she saw 
her two boys — Jack, seventeen, and Bill, fourteen — leave in 
their canoes. It was the beginning of a hunting trip from 
Chatham to London, Ontario, 

"S'long!" they shouted back in unison, little realizing 
their future adventures. 

Their craft was a home-made, canoe-shaped kayak. 
The opening to seat yourself in, though, was large enough 
for two. 

Three hours later the boys, who were thoroughly ex- 
hausted, decided to stop for lunch. They shot a couple of 
rabbits and barbecued them over a fire. Life went on like 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 81 

this for the next two and a half days till, finally. Bill and 
Jack, completely worn out. reached London. 

They beached their canoes in some bulrushes and set 
out for the city, seeking good times. After about two 
hours, when they had practically drunk all the pop in the 
town, they decided to go home. When they were half the 
distance to the boats they realized they hadn't seen a news- 
paper for two days. Bill agreed to procure one, so Jack 
proceeded back alone. Bill hurried to the city and found 
a paper. When he saw the headlines he was startled be- 
yond his wits. He read in blazing headlines "Three 
Notorious Criminals Escape from Kingsfield Penitentiary 
— Fifty Dollars Reward for Each". — "That's only a mile 
from here." he muttered. 

Meanwhile three policemen, who were looking for the 
prisoners, stumbled upon the boys' vessel. "Hey, O'Leary 
and Sullivan," shouted one, "We've got an important clue!" 
The other policemen rushed to the scene and gasped. 
O'Leary put his hand in the canoe and removed a forty- 
four. 

"Now we're getting somewhere," one said. 

"I've got an idea," Marlowe exclaimed. "We'll all wait 
here and lay a trap for the guys." 

"What do they look like?" inquired Sullivan of Mar- 
lowe. "We don't want to make a mistake." 

"Well, I don't know exactly," he replied, "but one is 
a fairly young man about seventeen and — " Just then 
there was a crackle of underbrush and Jack appeared on 
the scene. "Put your hands up; you're coming with us," 
Marlowe snapped as he whipped out his revolver. 

"Wha — " Jack exclaimed, "Good Lord, what is this?" 

"You know dam well," sneered Marlowe. "Snap the 
bracelets on him. O'Leary. You and Sullivan take him to 
the station and I'll wait for the other two." 

Jack, realizing that he was helpless, submitted himself 
to them without putting up much fight. Two minutes 
later he was being bundled off to jail. 



82 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Meanwhile Bill, who wanted to tell Jack the news, 
hurried to the clearing. As he was nearing his camping 
site he heard some harsh gutteral voices speaking. When 
he walked closer he distinguished some words — "You won't 
get away with this," he heard, "the others will be back 
soon." Bill peered through the underbrush and was horri- 
fied at the sight which greeted him. He saw a policeman 
with hands bound and three ruffians prodding him with 
theirs guns. Bill gasped, for he realized these were the 
crooks. He thought fast and started sneaking towards 
the canoe. He reached it safely and silently, and searched 
for his rifle. He saw that one was gone but he knew that 
another one was safely hidden in the bow of the boat. He 
crawled forward and found it. 

Slowly he crept back and reached the clearing with- 
out being discovered. He startled the criminals by his 
short but curt command "Drop your guns." One of them 
whirled around and a loud report split the air. Bill felt a 
bullet whiz by his ear, but his nerves were not shaken. He 
repeated his order and the crooks, dumbfounded, obeyed it. 
The lad walked over to one of them, pulled a dagger from 
his hip pocket, walked over to Marlowe and cut his bonds. 
"Thanks," he said, "you'll get the reward for this." 

At that moment, Sullivan and O'Leary appeared from 
the woods with Jack. "It was the wr- what on earth!" 
O'Leary gasped, "you've got 'em, eh? Nice going, but 
who's this guy?" he asked, pointing to Bill. 

"It wasn't me who captured them," Marlowe laughed. 
"It was this lad. The prisoners attacked me from behind 
and took me by surprise and tied me up. About five 
minutes later this lad came and overwhelmed them." 

Two hours later Jack and Bill were on their way home 
with one hundred and fifty on them. 

"That was fun," Jack exclaimed, "but am I ever 

envious of you!" 

—P. Macklem, HAI. 




F. G. WHITNEY (■65-'68) 
No. 6 on the School Register 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



> OLD l.i ^^^l^N0rE5< 





OLD BOYS' NOTES— I— On Active Service 
HONOURS 

The School is very proud of the many honours and 
awards being won by Old Boys, and extends sincere con- 
gratulations to those recently recognized. We hope to be 
able to publish the citations in the near future. 

In the New Year's Honour List the following Old Boys 
were mentioned: 

O.B.E.— A/Cmdr. D. E. ff. Jemmett ('26-'30) R.C.N. 
V.R. (non-operational) . 

M.B.E.— Major G. L. Boone, E.D. ('19-'26) 48th. High- 
landers; Major W. H. Broughall ('27-'32) R.H.L.I. 

Mentioned in Despatches — Wing Cmdr. J. C. Dum- 
brille ('16-'18) R.C.A.F.; Corporal P. C. Landry ('31-'39) 
R.C.A.F.; Group Captain A. R. McLemon, D.F.C. ('33-'37) 
R.C.A.F.; S L. R. P. Vaughan ('30-'34) R.C.A.F. 



Lieut. G. L. Rawlinson ('33-'36), Royal Canadian Dra- 
goons, has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry 
in action in Italy early in December. It is the first M.C. 

won by his regiment. 

***** 

Group Captain A. R. McLernon ('33-'37) who was 
awarded the D.F.C. in June, received the decoration last 
autumn at an investiture held by His Majesty the King 
at an R.C.A.F. station in England. 



84 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Lieutenant-Coionel Gordon Wotherspoon ('19-'26), 
South Alberta Reconnaissance Regiment, has been award- 
ed the Distinguished Service Order for great bravery and 
resource and for inspiring leadership given to the force he 
commanded in a crucial engagement in France. The cita- 
tion reads as follows: — 

"On August 18, 1944, a Reconnaissance regiment to- 
gether w^ith one company of infantry were given the task 
of defending St. Lambert-sur-Dives against a break- 
through of the enemy trapped in the Falaise gap. Lt.-Col. 
Wotherspoon was in command of the force. On August 
19, 1944, the enemy attacked the position in great force 
and continued the assault for the following three days 
using every form of attack from infantry infiltration to 
mass attacks with Panther and Tiger tanks. 

"During the entire period, Lt.-Col. Wotherspoon main- 
tained complete control of his forces, reorganizing and re- 
sisting his defences to meet every attack successfully. He 
visited all his positions personally many times under heavy 
mortar and shell fire. The example set by this officer and 
the skill with which he deployed resulted in the prevention 
of any break-through by the enemy. By the constant 
offensive action of his command, inspired by his example, 
severe enemy casualties were inflicted and hundreds of 
enemy killed or taken prisoner." 

***** 
The award of the M.B.E. to Major W. H. Broughall 
('27-'32) was made as of December 23. The only details 
we have so far come from a fellow officer who says that 
BUl's work has been uniformly good, and since D-day, out- 
standing. 

***** 

Flight Lieutenant Paul McFarlane ('31-'36) was 
awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for "great gal- 
lantry in the performance of his duty while serving with 
No. 5 Squadron of the R.C.A.F." The citation reads as 
follows: — 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 85 

"This officer, throughout a long tour on coastal opera- 
tions, has performed his duties as a navigator with the ut- 
most skill and efficiency. Throughout long and arduous 
flights, often under adverse weather conditions, the man- 
ner in which he has carried out his duties has set a splen- 
did example to all members of his crew. He is a zealous 
and resolute member of aircraft crew." 

Paul enlisted in April, 1941, trained with ground crew 
and later remustered to air crew. He received his ob- 
server's wings at Rivers, Man., also training at Toronto 
and Prince Albert, Sask., and receiving his commission at 
Frederickton, N.B. He was stationed in Newfoundland 
for a year, and is at present based at Yarmouth, N.S., with 
the East Coast Command. 

***** 

The Distinguished Flying Cross has been awarded to 
Flight Lieutenant R. D. McLaren ('28-'34), R.A.F. No 
citation has been received as yet, but we know that Bob 
was flying Mosquitoes and had been on operations in the 

Bomber Command. 

***** 

Flight Lieutenant Bob Keefer ('29-'36) has also been 
awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Bob has been 
overseas again after instructing in Canada for a while. We 
know he is engaged in photo-reconnaissance work and hope 
to receive the citation soon. 

***** 

Corporal Peter Landry ('31-'39), R.C.A.F., was Men- 
tioned in Despatches for his work with radar while serving 
with the Thunderbird Squadron overseas. 

***** 

Captain Dudley Dawson ('26-'31). R.C.A., has been 
mentioned in despatches for "gallant and distinguished 
service" in France. The citation has not been released, 
but word was received on February 11 that the award had 
been approved by His Majesty the King. 



86 TRINITY CX)LL.EGE SCHOOL RECORD 

MISSING 

We were very sorry to learn that Flying Officer Stuart 
O'Brien ('30-'33), R.C.A.F., had been reported missing 
after air operations over Duren, Germany, early in Decem- 
ber. Stuart joined the McGill C.O.T.C. in 1940, received 
his commission with the Royal Canadian Artillery, and 
spent two and a half years overseas in the 1st, Survey 
Regiment. In 1943, he transferred to the R.C.A.F., won 
his wings and a commission and returned overseas in 
January. 1944. Stuart was flying a Spitfire when last 
heard from. We sincerely hope that news will come of 
his safety. 



PRISONERS OF WAR 



We were relieved to hear that Capt. Tom King ('28- 
'31), previously reported missing, is now a prisoner of war 
in Germany. Tom joined the Kent Regiment in June, 1940, 
later going overseas on loan to the Imperial Army; he was 
taken prisoner in Holland. 

The following addresses have been received: — 
Capt. Thomas L. Alexander, M.B.E., Canadian, Pri- 
soner of War No. 623, Oflag 79, Germany. 

Lieut. J. R. Vipond, Canadian, Prisoner of War No. 
139428, Stalag 7A, Germany. 

Tommy Alexander's father received a prisoner of war 
card from him in December in which he mentioned having 
been hit three times "by them thar bullets" but in spite of 
the extra ballast was feeling fine. 



WOUNDED 



Lieut. G. Blake Knox ('30-'34), 1st Battalion, the 
Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada, who was first wounded 
in Normandy last August 12, rejoined his Battalion and 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 87 

was severely wounded in Belgium on September 29. His 
wounds of the head and back, involving the loss of one eye, 
were first treated in the forward area. He was flown to 
England and was reported recovering satisfactorily in hos- 
pital there in October. 

Lieut. Robert Fisher ('27-'29), Royal Canadian Regt.. 
was wounded in action in Italy on December 16. The 
wounds were in the neck and right arm and he expected 
to be in hospital for a few months. Robert served with 
the Canadian Fusiliers in Kiska for six months before 
transferring to the R.C.R. 

Lieut. Gordon Rawlinson, M.C., ('33-'36), Royal Cana- 
dian Dragoons, was wounded for the second time on 
December 17. This news came the day following the an- 
nouncement of his award. An amputation of his left leg 
below the knee was necessary, but we were glad to hear 
that Gord was recovering quite well. He is expected 
to return not later than April. Before going to Italy, Gord 
was Captain of the Canadian track team, and had distin- 
guished himself in many important battle manoeuvres. 

***** 

Lieutenant John Hayes ('35-'38) was wounded in Hol- 
land in September. He was sprayed by machine gun bul- 
lets and later "stopped a few pieces" from a grenade. He 
writes that he has been "grafting a new starboard ear" 
and we have heard that he has recovered. Johnnie was 
married last May. 



We were much relieved to hear that Flying Officer 
Bill Mood ('28-'38) was back at his base in England with 
only a sprained ankle. Bill was reported missing on 
December 3 and about a week later word came that one 
member of the crew had parachuted to safety at Liege with 
reason to hope for the others. It has been suggested that 
Bill's gym. work, including the flag-pole at "Craigiebum" 
was valuable preparation! 



88 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Commenting on his receipt of the D.F.C., Paul McFar- 
lane ('31-'36) says "... One of the most ironical aspects 
of the event is that friend Bob Keefer received a similar 
award just two days later. I never could get a step ahead 
of that man." Paul further mentions that Bob hoped to 
be back in Canada before spring, and that Peter Heybroek 
('33-'36), recently home on thirty days' furlough, was 
making arrangements to bring his wife to Canada. Paul 
sends best wishes and says "the training I received at the 

School must be borne in mind at such a time." 

* * * * * 

Captain Charlie Pentland ('22-'27) has spent a most 
interesting few years. Before the war he went to Eng- 
land and joined Imperial Airways, flying between Singa- 
pore and other points in the Far East, and England. For 
a while his headquarters were in Durban and he lived for 
a time in Palestine, working with another officer to open 
the Palestine Airways. He also lived in Haifa and Tel- 
Aviv. 

On leave in Winnipeg at the outbreak of war, Charlie 
immediately returned to England and tried to join the 
R.A.F. He was not allowed to change to a fighter group 
as careful pilots were needed for flying large transport 
planes. This has meant several years of flying people of 
importance around the world, and his work has been neces- 
sarily secretive. After so many years, it can be told that 
one assignment was flying King Peter of Yugoslavia to 
England; other assignments have taken Charlie to five 
continents. 

Late in January, he piloted the British Overseas Air- 
ways Liberator bringing Progressive Conservative Leader 
John Bracken back to Canada. The trip established a re- 
cord flying time of nine hours and twenty minutes for the 
non-stop, 2,400 statute-mile flight from Iceland to Mon- 
treal. 

Charlie married an English girl about three years ago, 
has a small son, and is stationed at Montreal. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 89 

John Law ('26-'30) has been promoted to Lieutenant- 
Colonel and is with No. 1, C.I.T.R. He was wounded last 
July 26 at Caen, and after seven weeks in hospital in 
France has been in England. 

* * * • • 

It was incorrectly reported in the October issue that 
Alec MacLaurin ('22-'25) had lost a leg in France. We are 
very glad to be able to rectify the error; Alec writes: 
'*.... sorry the papers mucked it up, but I have not lost 
a leg. I got a burst of M/G through my thigh and knee 
v/hich chopped up the nerves. My leg from the knee down 
is paralyzed but after a bit of operating they feel I may 
be as good as new ... I am not being discharged from the 
Army". 

Alec was wounded on July 26 at St. Andre-sur-Orne 
when he was in command of the advance guard. Most of 
the men with him v/ere killed. Major J. R. Popham ('28- 
'29) joined the action later and was badly hit. but he has 
pretty well recovered now. 

"Skip" Finley ('33-'40) was in the same hospital in 
England; Alec was writing from Ste. Anne de Bellevue, 

Quebec. 

***** 

Dick Moysey ('39-'41) is a Pilot Officer in the R.C.A.F.. 
stationed at Claresholm, Alberta. Dick graduated from 
S.F.T.S. last April and was sent to Nova Scotia before 
being posted overseas; instead of sailing he was returned 
to the West for an instructor's course. He writes that he 
ran into Lome Berry ('40-'41). R.C.A.F., at his present 

station. 

***** 

Under the title "Too Old to Fly", the Toronto Evenmg 
Telegram printed the following a short time ago: "Re- 
garded three years ago as too old for combat flying. Fly- 
ing Officer E. C. J. (Chris) Wilson ('21-'24), 37, has put 
in more than twenty operational trips against Germany's 



90 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

hottest targets as air bomber with a crack R.A.F. Lan- 
caster squadron .... Wilson, a former administration 
officer at No. I.T.S., Regina, reverted from flight heutenant 
to remuster to aircrew". 



Captain N. G. Gill ('11-'13), Royal Regt. of Canada, 
was recently invalided home and has been in hospital at 

Brockville. 

* * * * * 

George Gaisford ('20-'23), Lieutenant-Colonel in the 
Royal Armoured Corps, writes from London to thank the 
School for the cigarettes. George was recently awarded 
the D.S.O. for gallantry in action near Caen, Normandy, 
on July 10, but we do not yet know the details concern- 
ing the award. Wounded at the time, he does not expect 
to be fit again for active duty until February, and in the 
meantime has been working at the Ministry of Supply. We 
were very sorry to learn that George had lost an eye. 

He recognized Mr. Boulden in a tube station after 
twenty-one years and was impressed by the little he had 
changed and reminded of the great impression Mr. Boulden 
had made on him when at School. 

* « * • • 

Major D. J. Corrigall ('23-'24) took a course at an 
R.A.F. Staff College, and is now a G.S.O. (2), attached to 
H.Q., Canadian Army, serving as liaison officer with No. 
39 Wing, R.C.A.F. 

* « w « « 

Lieutenant Dick Birks ('39-'42), R.C.N.V.R., has been 
serving in H.M.S. "Savage", an aircraft carrier in operation 
off the Norwegian coast. Security reasons heretofore pre- 
vented disclosing this work which was undertaken last 
spring and last September and October. Dick was Hon. 
Mess Secretary and Torpedo Control Officer, and mentioned 
some leave at Christmas. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 91 

Major-General C. A. P. Murison, C.B., C.B.E., M.C., 
('11-'13). Royal Artillery, is Deputy Quartermaster-Gene- 
ral of the British Army. He won the Military Cross in 
the Great War and was awarded the C.B.E. for his ser- 
vices with the B.E.F. in France and at Dunkirk in 1940. 
Last October he visited Washington and Montreal on offi- 
cial business. 

***** 

Lieut. Hugh B. Savage ('28-'32), R.C.N.V.R.. after 
long service on convoy duty in the Atlantic and at H.M.C.S. 
"Avalon". St. John's, Newfoundland, has been a patient 
under medical treatment in the Western Division of the 
Montreal General Hospital. 

***** 

Colonel E. B. P. Armour ('06-'10) is in command of 
the 7th. (Toronto) Group, R.C.A. 

• « * * * 

Captain H. J. R. Newman ('29-'33) formerly of the 
Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada, is now commanding a 
mortar platoon, Royal Regt. of Canada, on the Western 

Front. 

***** 

Surg.-Lieut. Ed. Keefer ('29-'35), R.C.N.V.R., was re- 
tired from Active Service for medical reasons in Septem- 
ber, 1944. 

***** 

Pte. Tony Chipman ('40-'42) is now overseas after 
training at Camp Borden, Ontario. 

***** 
Captain Geoffrey Turpm ('30-'32) formerly with the 
Royal Montreal Regiment, served as acting second-in-com- 
mand of the Headquarters' Squadron, 22nd Canadian Arm- 
oured Regt., 1st Canadian Army in Belgium. He recently 
returned to Canada. 



92 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Captain Alan Staunton ('27-'31), Q.O.R.C, has been 
appointed personal assistant to the D.A. and Quarter- 
master-General, Headquarters, 2nd. Canadian Corps. 



Mids. John Waters ('37-'42), R.C.N. , has been trans- 
ferred to H.M.S. Raider, a destroyer. 

* * * * * 

Captain G. S. Osier ('16-'23), 48th. Highlanders, was 
demobilized last August and has returned to business with 
Osier and Hammond in Toronto. 

* * * * * 

Dave Walker ('41-'44) has been transferred from the 
R.C.A.F., and is now a Trooper m the Armoured Corps in 
training at Camp Borden. His address is: — F-37914, Tpr. 
Walker. D. A.. No. 2 C.A.C.T.R., "A" Squadron, 6 Troop. 

Camp Borden, Ontario. 

* * * * * 

P/0. John McCullough ('35-'38) has been overseas 
since last August, and recently completed an administra- 
tion and army drill course after which he was hoping to 
see some action. John received his wings in May, 1943, 
and was posted to No. 1 Air Observer School at Malton 
where he was a civilian staff pilot for fourteen months on 
indefinite leave from the Air Force. 

* « * * * 

L.A.C. Jack Bamett ('38-'42) has written from Fingal. 
Ontario, where he was completing his course as bombardier. 
After graduation he expected to take a ten weeks' course 
at an Air Observers' School for navigation. He came 
second at I.T.S. with an average of S9.9'^/r, and has found 
his training at School most helpful, particularly in mathe- 
matics. He mentions seeing Bruce Sully ('40-'42) who is 
in the Air Force at I.T.S. near Fingal and also Jim Hanna 
(•38-'39). R.C.A.F. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 93 

L/Cpl. Peter MacKinnon ('37-'41). R.C.O.C, is sta- 
tioned in Vancouver and has seen Cpl. Bill Osier {'16-'22). 
also stationed there. While on furlough he ran into Sergt. 
Jack Cartvvright ('35-'38) who was returning to Barrie- 
field to go on course. Peter sends his congratulations to 
the Rugby Team "on the grand showing they made against 
Ridley". His address is 1966 Haro Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

***** 

Wing Cmdr. Dal Russel. D.S.O.. D.F.C. & Bar ('26- 
'34), writes early in December that they have moved to 
a field of their own and "for the first time since before D- 
Day the whole wing is out of tents and has a roof over its 
head". A few days before writing Dai's wing ran into 
over forty 109's and destroyed five for the loss of one air- 
craft whose pilot they believed to be safe. "That is the 
first time we have sighted the hun in the air for some 
time. I only wish we could see him more often". 

***** 

Chaplain and Hon. Major C. H. Boulden, M.B.E., men- 
tions much variety in life including saying prayers at the 
B.B.C. on the Allied Expeditionary Force Programme every 
day for one week in three at 0555 hours and 2300 hours, 
and also the addition of some C.W.A.C. "to my flock". 
***** 

Major Edgar Ogilvie, E.D., ('16-'19) has been on a 
special armoured gunnery course and now visits the various 
armoured units instructing and helping with new gunnery 
equipment. "I can assure you there is lots of new equip- 
ment appearing these days". 

***** 

Lieut. Heber Evans ('18-'23) is in charge of a Special 
Construction Section with the Canadian Army in Italy. 
Comparing the relative merits of Italy and Algeria as 
training space for reinforcements. Heber found Italy some- 
what crowded .... "The neighbours objected if we let off 



94 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

teller mines in their backyard, whereas an Arab would 
just move and probably steal the hole". 

* * * * * 

Sergt. Air Gunner Bob Day ('41-'44) graduated early 
in January from No. 3 B. & G. School, Macdonald, Mani- 
toba, but goes into the civilian reserve after some leave, 
being released at Toronto. He still hopes to get overseas 
somehow. 

***** 

Dean Dignam ('38-'42) is a Cadet Officer in the Mer- 
chant Navy, taking a ten weeks' course at St. Margaret's 
Sea Training School, Hubbard, N.S. 
***** 

Vernon Howland ('31-'35) has been accepted for trans- 
fer to the R.C.N, (permanent force) and is now A/Pay- 
master Lieut.-Cmdr., retaining all but two months of his 
R.C.N.V.R. seniority. He left Comwallis last July and 
has been at Naval Service Headquarters in Ottawa. Con- 
gratulations on the birth of a daughter. 

***** 
Lieut.-Col. O. G. Shepherd ('07-'10) is District Depot 
Officer at M.D. 7, St. John, N.B. Major J. F. G. Lee, M.C., 
('98-'03) is with the R.C.A.M.C. also stationed in St. John. 

***** 

A.B. Ed. Gordon ('42-'43) is enjoying life in a mine- 
sweeper; his address is: — V-62845, H.M.C.S. Whitby, c/o 
F.M.O., St. John's, Newfoundland. 

* * * * • 
Pte. Bill Beeman ('41-'43) is overseas with No. 1 Cana- 
dian Parachute Training Unit. 

***** 

Congratulations to Jack Langmuir ('35-'40) on his 
promotion to Squadron Leader. 



ft. ^ ■ 



I 





CHAPLAIN AND 

HON. CAPT. R. T. F. BRAIN, 

MC. 




l-IliUIbNANT G. K. JONhS 
D.F.C. and AIR MEDAL 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 95 

Michael Hare ('40-'42) is now serving in the British 

Army. 

***** 

Captain Eric Cochran ('28-'35) returned from over- 
seas in December and is now on staff course at Kingston. 

* * * * * 

Lieut. Budge Jukes ('34-'38) has been posted to Hah- 
fax from the African area. He arrived in Canada at the 
end of January for some leave before taking up his new 

duties. 

***** 

Asheleigh Moorhouse ('35-'38) was commissioned as 
Sub-Lieutenant in the Fleet Air Arm in November and was 
soon after transferred to the U.S. Naval Air station at 
Corpus Christi, Texas, where he hoped to receive his wings 
in January. He is one of five Canadians at the station and 
says that all five have enjoyed the Record! The course 
was lengthened, but he was hoping to get on TBF Avengers 
soon; the other choice is Corsairs. Asheleigh sent best 

wishes to the School. 

* * * * * 

P/0. Craig Somerville ('31-'41) ran into F/0. Bill Mc- 
Connell ('34-'39) and Lieut. Skip Finley ('33-'40) his first 
day in London, spending several days with the latter, who 
looked well. (Skip has since returned to Canada). He 
also saw Lieut.-Colonel George Renison ('33-'38), Captain 
Clarke McGlashan ('28-'36). Mike Keegan ('39-'40), now 
in the Fleet Air Arm, and "the one and only "Fish" Cald- 
well ('38-'42), who was just the same as ever". 

Craig said that Lieut. John Hayes ('35-'38) had pretty 
well recovered from his wounds. Don McLelland (S.A.C.) 
told of having seen Tommy Alexander just before he was 
taken prisoner "in one of the hottest spots he ever hoped 
to be in and Tom was as cool as he always was". 



96 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

David Carmichael ('40-'43) is a Coder on H.M.S. Well- 
ington. He says he enjoyed his short career at Balliol 
studying Physics and Chemistry; in games he indulged in 
soccer, boxing, swimming and running. His eyesight was 
not good enough for a Naval University course; hence, he 
enlisted as a Probationary Radio Mechanic, Class 1, being 
later classified as a Coder. He now finds himself in a 
warm climate where there is plenty of fruit. David's ad- 
dress is: D/5X539524, 0/Coder Carmichael, D.G.O., H.M.S. 
Wellington, Mess 4, G.P.O., London. 

Norman Paterson ('39-'43) is now at an Officer Cadet 
Training Unit in Yorkshire. He says he often thinks of 
the School but does not hear much direct news. Norman 
speaks of seeing Carmichael, Sneath, Dodd, Lambert, the 
Youngs, Charrington, Dewar and Ransford. 

Norman is in the Royal Signals and did very well in 
his course at Oxford, passing in the first ten out of a 
large number of candidates. After a total of fifteen months' 
training he should be eligible for active service. 

Blair Paterson is doing well at Stowe and Christopher 
is completing his School Certificate at Harrow. 

* * * • * 

James Dodd ('40-'43) is a Pilot OflTicer in the R.A.F., 
No. 165585, stationed at Ashbourne, Derby. In December 
he was completing an O.T.U. Course and finding the 
weather "damp and penetrating". Jaimie wrote the en- 
trance exams for New College, Oxford, and passed them 
successfully. Congratulations. He says some English 
schoolmasters seem to imagine T.C.S. "to be out in the 
wilds surrounded by a stockade with a mounted guard 
watching for Indians and bears." 

* * * * « 

Hugh Paterson ('39-'43) wrote from Belgium in 
November on T.C.S. note paper! He says he always keeps 
a supply. Hugh was heading for Burma when his orders 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 97 

were cancelled at the last minute and he was sent to the 
continent on secret work. His billets were comfortable 
and the people very friendly. Some of the cities he had 
seen did not possess a single undamaged house. Hugh 
sends his best wishes to the School for 1945 "both in the 
class rooms and on the playing fields". Good luck to you, 
Hugh. 



OLD BOYS NOTES— II 



J. D. Johnson (Governor) has been appointed member 
of the Board of Governors of McGill University, Montreal. 

• • « • « 

Crossley Gale ('14-'16) has returned to Burlington 
Steel after three and a half years with the Department of 
Munitions and Supply, where he was first Assistant Direc- 
tor of the Steel Division in Washington and later with the 
office of the Steel Controller at Ottawa. 

After service in France in the last war, Crossley was 
seven years with the Sales Department of B. & S. H. 
Thompson & Co., and later was with Jones & Laugh ton 
Steel Products Co. He joined Burlington Steel in 1935 
after serving as Travelling Secretary for Ontario of the 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association. 

* * * * # 

Glenn Curtis writes from the University of Toronto: 
"About half the T.C.S. contingent is in Engineering and 
we are having a good time. "Granny" Holton, Pete Brit- 
ton and "Big Mac" MacLaren. who are in Mechanical En- 
gineering, take most of their lectures with me. The sur- 
veying professor's only complaint is that they spend too 
much time calculating the shortest distance between them 
and the cute blond across the campus. If jrou don't mind 
the smell of So3 or H2S, you can firid Dick LeSueur and 
"Dodo" Saunderson anytime in the chemistry lab. It is 
rumoured that Dick has passed a chemistry test! Pete 



98 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Bi'itton hopes to play hockey for S.P.S. this winter and 
Dodo's annual basketball blisters have returned. 

"The rest of this year's Old Boys are at Trinity, wear- 
ing black gowns and ties to lectures. "Bosco" Beament, 
who is in Soc. and Phil., has been playing rugby and swim- 
ming. Dudley Burland, in Maths, and Physics, and Dave 
Higginbotham, who is in Commerce and Finance, were on 
the Trinity Soccer team. "Doggie" Millward, in Classics, 
looks after the social end of things and can always be 
found at a St. Hilda's reception. 

"We often see Bill Greer ('37-'43) who is m Architec- 
ture, Doug. Huestis ('39-'42) and Eric Elliot ('38-'41) in 
Meds., and "Pooky" Lyall ('37-'41) who is in Engineering. 

"One thing the Arts men and Engineers agree on is 
that we would all like to be back at T.C.S. this year". 

The Engineers did well in their term exams: John Mc- 
Laren 91";^, Dick LeSueur 86%, Peter Britton and Donald 
Saunderson, Sl^r , were at the top. Congratulations. 
# * # * * 

From McGill, Dave Morgan writes: "I see 'Butch' Car- 
lisle frequently around the Arts Building as Commerce 
students take their lectures there. He is his same jovial 
self and seems to be enjoying life thoroughly. Chris Bovey 
is taking first year Engineering, one of the hardest courses 
on the campus. Peter Vivian is in first year Arts with me 
and we often bump into each other at French lectures. 
Hugh McLennan is taking second year Honours Chemistry, 
Chris, Peter and Hugh all joined the Zeta Psi Fraternity. 

"Dave Fricker is also taking Honours Chemistry, find- 
ing it quite difficult and working very hard at it as only 
he can. Huntly Millar is in first year Engineering, often 
seen driving a large and luxurious car to college — lucky 
boy. Bill Chase is taking Science and we meet daily in 
Algebra lectures, comparing our various efforts. Nigel 
Chapman is in Commerce; I see him twice every week as 
we take our training in the Navy course together. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 99 

" 'Butch' Layne ('38-'43) and BUI MacCallan ('41-'43) 
are here taking first year Engineering and third year 
Science (Honours Chemistry). I see them all the time as 
we are all members of Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity. When 
Blackstone came to Montreal, 'Butch' saw him three times 
and he is always showing us a new card trick or something 
equally mystifying. John Wight ('41-'43) is doing very 
well, in second year Commerce, member of Delta Upsilon 
Fraternity and Secretary of the Commerce Undergraduate 
Society. Peter Turcot ('39-'43) and Ian Murray ('38-'43) 

are also at McGill." 

***** 

Jim Southey, writing from Queens, says: "I never did 
manage to make the 'Record' deadline with my editorials, 
but hope that this will sneak into the stop-press. I don't 
quite know what I am going to say about Old Boys here, 
but I like the idea of giving the Tricolour a little publicity 
so that a few more people will come to THE university. 

"Ken Phin ('37-'40) graduated last year with first class 
honours in Psychology and Biology and has entered Medi- 
cine this year. Skipping a year, he will get his M.D. in '49 
after which he intends to be a psychiatrist. Ken was editor- 
in-chief of the Queen's Journal from 1942-44 and has also 
written several prize-winning plays. This year he is stu- 
dent director of the Queen's Radio Workshop, a branch of 
the Drama Guild. He is one of the top "brains" in the 
University. 

"Donald Delahaye and I are lowly frosh. We both 
made the senior football team, playing left inside and snap 
just as we did on Middleside and Bigside at T.C.S. We 
were both in the starting line-up and played sixty minutes 
in a couple of games. The team won the Service Football 
League here in Kingston. 

"I have seen 'Froggie' Symons ('38-'43) and Dave 
Brooks ('41-'43) who are in the Fleet Air Arm stationed 
at Collin's Bay. I also saw Mr. Humble at a concert and 



100 TRINITY COLi,EGE SCHOOL RECORD 

he said that 'Dago' Spiers ('37-'43) is also stationed at 
Barriefield. 

"I got the Record and think it is very good. Peter 
Dobell and his staff are making a very fine job of it. Tell 
them to watch that final number though — it sneaks up on 
you 



t" 



Bill Greer ('37-'43) is an Assistant Editor of the Tri- 
nity University Review. 

* * * * * 

Recent visitors to the School include: — Pte. J. A. Bea- 
ment ('37-'44), Pte. E. M. Parker ('38-'44), A/B A. D. 
V/heeler ('41-'43), Cadet Mike Phillips ('41-'43), Cadet Bob 
Wisener ('40-'44), Fred Russell ('21-'24), Tpr. Dave 
Walker ('41-'44), John Ingham ('42-'44), S/L Eric Morse 
('17-'21), F/L Hadley Armstrong ('29-'37), Jim Price ('26- 
'28), Sergt. Air Gnr. Bob Day ('41-'44), Pte. Bob Morgan 
('40-'44). 

^ «: ^ * # 

At Trinity College, Toronto, John Beament ('37-'44) 
played football and was spoken of as "the strong point on 
the line". Jack Goering ('41-'43) won the javelin with a 
throw of 162 feet in the annual track meet and did well in 
the two mile run. R. E. Mackie ('40-'43) wrote a poem 
which was published in the Trinity Review and which we 
reprint in this issue. David Higginbotham is starring in 

Hockey and Squash. 

« • * • • 

David Grand ('40-'43) is doing well at Rugby and was 
promoted at Christmas from the Upper Fifth to the Lower 
Twenty. He is now specializing in Science. We hope he 
will revisit his Canadian School before long. 

• • • • • 

Congratulations to Michael Reford ('40-'42) who has 
won the Jodrell Scholarship for Mathematics at Queen's 
College, Oxford. His Housemaster at Wellington says Mic- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD IQl 

had could have won a Scholarship in any subject he chose. 
Michael was Head of Stanley House and a School Prefect. 
He has now entered the Fleet Air Arm. Our best wishes 

go with him. 

***** 

The Rev. Eric Montizambert ('02-'07). formerly Dean 
of St. Matthew's Cathedral, Laramie, Wyoming, was re- 
cently appointed Canon of Grace Cathedral. San Francisco, 
and head of the newly organized and heavily endowed 
School of the Prophets. The organization is a graduate 
school for Protestant Episcopal clergy and conference 
centre for the Pacific and Western States. 



UNKNOWN ADDRESSES 

"Records" have been returned from the latest ad- 
dresses we have of the Old Boys listed below. We would 
very much appreciate any information as to the present 
whereabouts of the following, preferably both home and 
overseas addresses, and we ask all Old Boys to keep us 
posted as to any changes: — 

1935-36 ADAMS. R. C, Sergt., R.C.A. 

1935 ADAMS. S. M., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1910-14 BETHUNE, W. D., L/Cpl., R.C.E. 

1921-25 BIBBY, K. A., Dr. 

1921-23 BINGHAM. C. S. K., Lieut., 4th P.L.D.G. 

Master BRACK, C. F., Lieut., R.A. 

1882-85 CAMERON, Hugh 

1871-72 CAMPBELL, C. G. 

1919 CAMPBELL, M. R., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1904-07 COADY, R. T. 

1911-13 COOK, T. R., Major, Canadian Forestry Corps. 

1933-38 CURTIS, E. H., Cpl., U.S. Army. 

1921-23 DUDLEY, E. J. S., Lieut.-Col., Saskatoon Lt. 

Infantry (M.G.). 

1936-39 EVANS, A. H., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 



102 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



1920-21 GARDINER. A. T., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1927-29 GLASS, D. C., Sergt, R.C.A.P.C. 

1914-15 HALE, J. J., Capt., R.C.A. 

1917-18 HENDERSON, I. S., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1927-29 INGLIS, R. S., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1936-38 ISAACSON, R. S.K. 

1918-20 JONES, W. O., Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1939-40 KEEGAN, D. M. R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1922-30 KIRK, C. B. K., Lieut., R.C.A.M.C. 

1930-35 LANGDALE, A. H., Spr., R.C.E. 

1899-04 LAWSON, H. O., Colonel. 

1915-16 LAZIER, F. R. L. 

1919-27 LAZIER, S. D. 

1923-26 LEGGAT, M. H., Pte., Seaforth Highlanders. 

1922-27 LONDON, G. T., Major, Can. Scottish Regt. 

1927-28 MAUGHAN, A. H., Capt., Can. Gren. Guards. 

1919-21 McDonald, h. s., f/l, r.c.a.f. 

1926-32 MICKLE, W. J., British Army. 

1925-29 MUDGE, R. M. L. 

1928-31 NEVILLE, D. G., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1925-29 NICHOL. T. E., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1920-22 ROGERS, H. H. 

1928-32 ROGERS, W. F. B., Lieut., Irish Regt. of Can. 

1928-31 ROSS, J. K., Capt. 1st Hussars. 

1927-32 SOMERS, D. C, Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1934-35 TAYLOR, P. Y., Lieut., U.S. Army Air Force. 

1915-19 TORNEY, T. H. F., Major, R.C.A. 

1929-30 TROW, G. H. Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1923-27 USBORNE, J. E. 

1931-33 WHITE, W. L. C, Lieut., Regina Rifles of Can. 

1925-26 WHYTE, K. T., Capt., 48th Highlanders of 

Canada. 

Master WILSON, D. S., Lieut., Pictou Highlanders. 

1925-32 WOOD, J. D., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1927-31 WORRELL, J. C. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 103 

BIRTHS 

Hampson — On January 6, 1945, at the Western Envision, 
Montreal General Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs. John G. 
Hampson ('34-'39), a daughter. 

Rowland — On November 7, 1944, to A/Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr. 
Vernon W. Rowland ('31-'35), R.C.N.. and Mrs. Rowland, 
a daughter. 

Martin — On September 20. 1944, at Ramilton. to Major 
Rubert A. Martin ('27-'29), Armoured Corps, and Mrs. 
Martin, a daughter. 

Wotherspoon — On February 8, 1945, at London, England, 
to Major Richard B. Wotherspoon ('25-'31), R.E.. and 
Mrs. Wotherspoon, a daughter. 



MARRIAGES 



Balfour — Clark— On October 7, 1944, at St. Clement's 
Church, Toronto, Sub-Lieut. William Southam Balfour 
('37-'39), R.C.N.V.R., to Miss Mary Stuart Clark. 

Berr>- — Craig — On March 4, 1944, at Oshawa. Flying Offi- 
cer Lome Rogers Berry ('40-'41), R.C.A.F., to Miss 
Sarah Jane Craig. 

Evans — Morewood — On December 27, 1944, at St. Michael's 
Church. Bergerville, Quebec, Robert Lewis Evans ('22- 
'28) to Miss Elizabeth Anne Morewood of Bryn Mawr. 
Pennsylvania. 

Kovacs — Reddle — On November 3, 1943, at Calvary 
Church, Westmount, Quebec. Sergeant Robert Victor 
Kovacs ('39-'41), R.C.A.F.. to Miss Norma Reddle. 

Mussen — ^Hooper — On January 6, 1945, at the Church of 
the Messiah, Toronto, Flight Lieutenant Peter Vladimir 
Mussen ('20-'27), R.C.A.F., to Miss Helen Harry Hooper. 



104 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Phipps — Kendal-Quarrie — On August 15, 1944, in London, 
England, Major Norman Ernest Phipps ('21-'25), R.C.A.. 
C.M.H.Q., to Miss Dorothy Kendal-Quarrie. 

Popham — Sequin — In England, Major J. R. Popham ('28- 
'29), the Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada, to Lieutenant 
(N/S) Gertrude R. Sequin. 

Summerhayes — Montgomerj^ — On October 11, 1944, at 
the Church of The Blessed Sacrament, Connah's Quay, 
Chester, England, Flight Lieutenant Douglas Thornton 
Summerhayes ('17-'23), R.A.F.V.R., to Miss Margaret 
Helen Patricia Montgomery. 



DEATHS 

Chamberlain — On February 10, 1940, at Toronto, Aubrey 
Robert Chamberlain ('18-'19). 

Combe — On August 27, 1944, in France, Lieutenant James 
Owen Combe ('26-'32), Essex Scottish Regiment. Killed 
in Action. 

Daw — On December 8, 1944, at Orillia, Philip Ford Daw 
('04-'07). 

DuMoolin — On January 12, 1945, at St. Michael's Hospital, 
Toronto. Walter H. DuMoulin ('87-'88). 

Hanltain — On January 24, 1945, at Port Hope, Mrs. Haul- 
tain, in her seventy-ninth year. 

Jones — On January 6, 1945, at Toronto, T. Roy Jones 
(Gk)vemor) in his sixty-fifth year. 

McLaren — On December 5, 1944, in Italy, Major Frederick 
George McLaren ('28-'37), 48th Highlanders of Canada. 
Killed in Action. 

Whitney — On January 28, 1945, at Toronto, Forbes Gamble 
Whitney ('65-'68), in his ninety-first year. 



TRINITY COLJ^EGE SCHOOL RECORD 105 

P. F. DAW 

PhUip Ford Daw ('04-'07), Life Member of the O.B.A.. 
received his B.A. degree at McMaster University and then 
went overseas in the Great War, serving as a Captain in 
the Canadian Field Artillery. Due to ill health from war 
service he lived for some time in California, but spent most 
of his life in Hamilton. For fifteen years he was sales re- 
presentative of the Steel Company of Canada in the district 
from Brantford to Windsor. 

Early in the present war he was with Defence In- 
dustries, Ltd., as supervisor at Nobel. He then joined the 
Wartime Prices and Trade Board and was in charge of 
the Orillia branch at the time of his death. 

He is survived by his widow, his parents, Rev. Canon 
Samuel Daw and Mrs. Daw, and three brothers, Charles 
('06-'08), of Elrose, Sask., Fraser ('00-'04), of Carlisle. 
Ont.. and Rev, William Henry, of Hamilton, to whom we 
send our sympathy. 



MRS. HAULTAIN 



T.C.S. boys everywhere will be grieved to learn of the 
death in Port Hope on January 24 of Mrs. Haultain, for 
many years a close friend of the School and mother of three 
Old Boys. "Grannie", as she came to be affectionately 
known by the boys, was present at most School functions. 
She kept up her interest in T.C.S. affairs to the end and it 
will be strange to be without her on future occasions. 

During holidays, hundreds of boys who have remain- 
ed at the School will remember her continued hospitality; 
she was always upset at the thought of any boy spending 
his holiday without special attention at Christmas and 
Easter. 

We send our sympathy to Captain Robin Haultain 
{'04-'09). R.C.A.. Norman Haultain ('12-'15). Captain 
Charlie Haultain, E.D. ('13-'18), Midland Regiment and 
Miss Etta Haultain, of Port Hope. 



106 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

F. G. WHITNEY 

Forbes Gamble Whitney ('65-'68) was the oldest living 
Old Boy and the sixth boy to enter the School, then situated 
at Weston. He kept in close touch with us, sending greet- 
ings at the Anniversary celebrations in 1940 and maintain- 
ing his membership in the O.B.A. until his death. 

He was born in the old Whitney homestead in Toronto, 
now part of the Wellesley Hospital. As a young man he 
joined the real estate firm established by his father, and 
succeeded him as head of the company. 

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. O. M. Biggar, 
Ottawa, and Miss Rena Whitney, at home, and two sons, 
Arthur, Edmonton, and Claude Whitney, Toronto. 



TRINITY COLLEGE 

In the University of Toronto 

TRINITY COLLEGE, FEDERATED WITH THE 

UNIVERSITY, IS ONE OF THE ARTS 

COLLEGES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

AND INCLUDES 

A Faculty of Arts providing instruction for 
students in classes of limited size in all subjects 
taught by the Colleges. 

The full advantages of Federation with the 
University, instruction by its professors, qualifica- 
tion for its scholarships and degrees, with its 
library, laboratories and athletic facilities and mem- 
bership in Hart House. 

A Faculty of Divinity in which Trinity exercises 
its University powers of conferring degrees and 
prepares candidates for the ministry of the Church. 

A new residence for men students was opened 
in September, 1941, at Trinity College. This and 
the new St. Hilda's Residence for women students, 
opened in 1938, enable the College to offer excellent 
accommodation. 

The scholarships offered by the College have 
recently been revised and largely increased. Full 
particulars will be supplied on request. 

For information concerning fees, scholarships, 
exhibitions, bursaries, etc., address: The Registrar, 
Trinity College, Toronto. 



Trinity College School Record 



VOL. 48, NO. 4. AHUL, 1945. 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Aaive Service List 

Editorials 1 

Chapel Notes 5 

School Notes — 

Shooting Distinction 8 

.VIr. Dickson-Kenwin 8 

Choir Whole 9 

Pancaici.' Toss 10 

Mrs. Phoebe Erskine McKeller 10 

Visit of Dr. Berger 11 

Visit of Mr. Davidson 11 

Mrs. Ketchum's Birthday 12 

General Election 12 

Provincial Hockey Setni-Finals 13 

Debate 14 

House Notes 15 

Contributions — 

\»Tien It Rains 21 

The Pearl Diver 22 

In Memoriam 26 

In the Depth of the Silences 27 

A Short Story 29 

Off the Record— 

A Secondare' Reaction 32 

Opinions 34 

Hodcey — 

Editorial 35 

Group Play-offs 42 

First Round Play-offs 45 

Second Round Play-offs 49 

Eastern Ontario Finals 53 

Masters vs. Seniors 55 

Middleside 57 

Littleside 59 

Basketball- 
Seniors 64 

Juniors 73 

Squash Tournament 75 

The Junior School Record 76 

Old Boys' Notes — 

On Active Service 82 

Old Boys' Notes II — 

Annual Dnner and General Meeting 91 

Births 93 



Corporation of 
Trinity College School 

VISITOR: 
His Grace the Archbishop of Toronto and Primate op All Canada. 

GOVERNING BODY 
Ex-Officio Members 

The Ch^\ncellor of Trinity University. 

The Rev. the Provost of Trintty College. 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., B.Paed., Headmaster. 

Elected Members 

The Hon. Mr. Justice R. M. Dennistoun, C.B.E., V.D., BA., LL.D Winnipeg 

Robert P. Jellett, Esq Montreal 

G. B. Strathy, Esq., K.C., M.A Toronto 

Norman Seagram, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. Senator G. H. Barnard, K.C Victoria, B.C. 

CoL J. W. Langmuir, M.B.E., V.D Toronto 

Capt. Colin M. Russell Montreal 

J. H. Lithgow, Esq Toronto 

A. E. Juices, Esq Vancouver, B.C. 

Col. H. C. Osborne, C.M.G., C.B.E., V.D., M.A Onawa 

I-Iugh F. Labatt, Esq London, Ont. 

F. G. Mathers, Esq., B.A., LL.B Winnipeg 

Major B. M. Osier Toronto 

J. Bruce Mackinnon, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. R. C. Matthews, P.C, B.A Toronto 

Wing Commander Charles Burns Toronto 

The Right Rev. R. J. Renison, M.A., D.D Iroquois Falls, Ont. 

Admiral Percy W. Nelles, C.B., R.C.N Ottawa 

Lieut. -Col. J. Ewart Osborne, D.S.O., V.D., B.Sc Toronto 

Air Marshal W. A. Bishop, V.C, C.B., D.S.O., M.C., D.F.C, LL.D Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. Gerald W. Birks, O.B.E Montreal 

J. D. Johnson, Esq Montreal 

Major W. M. Pearce, M.C Toronto 

G. Meredith Huycke, Esq., K.C, BA. Toronto 

S. S. DuMoulin, Esq Hamilton 

Argue Martin, Esq., K.C Hamilton 

T. W. Seagram, Esq Waterloo, Ont. 

Gerald Larkin, Esq Toronto 

R. V. LeSueur, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

Wilder G. Penfield, C.M.G., M.D., D.S.C, D.C.L., FJtS., FJi.C^.,. .. .Montreal 
Captain Strachan Ince, D.S.C Toronto 

Appointed by Trinity College 
The Hon. Mr. Justice P. H. Gordon, C.B.E., K.C, M.A., LLX>., B.C.L. 

Elected by the Old Boys 

P. A. DuMoulin, Esq London, Ont. 

Capt. P. G. Campbell, M.C Toronto 

Major H. L. Symons, E.D Toronto 



Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. 

FOUNDED 1865 

Head Master 

P. A. C. Kbtchum, Esq., M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge; B.A., Trinity 

College, Toronto; B.Paed., Toronto. St. Mark's School, Southborough, 

Mass., 1929-1933. (1933) 

House Masters 
C. Scott, Esq., London University. (Formerly Headmaster of King's College 

School, Windsor). (1934) 
R. G. S. Maibr, Esq., B.A., Harvard; University of Paris; Cornell University. (1936) 

Chaplain 
The Rev. E. R. Bagley, M.A., St. Peter's Hall, Oxford; Ridley Hall, Cambridge. 
(1944). 

Assistant Masters 

Col. H. V. de Bury, C.B.E., Royal Military College, Kingston, 1905-10; Stooey- 

hurst College, England. (1943) 

F. P. Gregoris, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; University of London; University 

of Rome; B.Ph.; Ph.L. (1943) 

G. R. Gwynne-Timothy, Esq., B.A., Jesus College, Oxford. (1944). 

G. A. Hill, Esq., B.A., University College, Toronto; Ontario College of Education. 

(1942) 
A. B. Hodgeits, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto; University of Wisconsin. 

(1942) 
A. B. Key, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; Ontario College of Education. (1943) 
P. H. Lewis, Esq., M.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. (1922) 
W. K. MoLSON, Esq., B.A., McGill University. (Jan. 1942) 
A. C. Morris, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N.S. (1921) 
A. H. N. Snelgrove, Esq., Mount Allison University. (1942) 
R. Thompson, Esq., M.A., St. Catherine's College, Cambridge; Santander. (1942) 
A E. White, Esq., M.A., McMaster University. (Jan. 1945). 

Tutor 
LiEUT.-CoL. K. L. Stevenson, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. (1930) 

Visiting Masters 

Edmund Cohu, Esq Music 

S J. DoLiN, Esq., Mus. Bac Music 

Physical Instructor for both Schools 
Lieut. S. J. Bait, Royal Fusiliers; formerly Physical Instructor at R.M.C., 
Kingston, Ontario. (1921) 

THE JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Principal 

C. J. Tori-BNHAM, Esq., B.A.. Queen's University, Kingston. (1937) 

A siistant Masters 
H. G. Jambs, Esq., Leeds University. (1922). 

J. D. Burns, Esq., University of Toronto, Normal School, Toronto. (1943). 
Mrs. Cecil Moore, Normal School, Peterborough. (1942). 

D. W. Morris, Esq., Normal School, London. (1944). 

H. C. Swallow, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto. (1944). 



Bursar G. C. Temple, Esq. 

Physiaan F. W. Diamond, Esq., M.D. 

Nurse Miss Rliea Ficlc, R.N. 

Dietitian Mrs. J. F. Willan 

Matron (Senior School ) Mrs. G. R. Gwynne-Timothy 

Nurse-Matron (Junior School) Mrs. G. Sturgeon. R.N. 

Dietitian (Junior School ) Mrs. D. M. Crowe 

Secretary Miss E. M. Gregory 



SCHOOL DIRECTORY 

PREFECTS 

E. J. M. Huycke (Head Prefea), P. C. Dobell, H. C. D. Cox, J. M. Irwin, 

E. Howard, H. French, E. McC. Sinclair. 

SENIORS 

J. R. deC. Warner, T. McC. Wade, J. R. McMurrich, H. C. Butterfield, 

G. P. Vernon, P. H. Mclntyre, G. A. H. Pearson, D. A. Davidson, 

G. C. Bovaird, J. N. Matthews, J. K. P. Allen, D. A. Decker, 

D. H. Wilson, J. B. Austin. 

HOUSE OFFICERS 
W. G. Phippen, J. G. Greig, P. L. Gilbert, V. Dawson, R. V. S. Smitfa, 
W. G, McDougall, D. H. Roenisch, R. A. Hope, R. C. Paterson, R. M. Kirk- 
patrick, P. C. Stratford, F. A. H. Greenwood, J. G. Gibson, S. C. Edmonds, 
D. S. Hare, P. A. Richardson, G. N. M. Currie, E. E. Gibson, W. C. Long, 
G. L. Robarts, J. C. Barber, P. M. Bird, W. J. A. Toole, C. A. W. GUlan, 
J. R. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle, F. J. Main. 

SCHOOL COUNCIL 
The Headmaster, 3 Prefects 
VI Scholarship — Pearson i (French i) VC — Gillan (Hardaker) 

VIA— Vernon (Sinclair) IVA (1)— French ii (McDowell) 

VIB— Howard (Hope) IVA (2)— McPherson (Jarvis) 

VA — Greenwood (McDougall) IVB — Fennell (Wismer) 

VB— CGrady (Crowe) IIIA— Hall (Rogers) 

IIIB— Spencer (Pilcher) 

CHAPEL 

Head Sacristan — D. S. Hare. 

Sacristans 

1. B. Campbell, W. A. Curtis, V. Dawson, J. G. Gordon, H. A. Hyde, 

W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, R. W. S. Robertson, D. H. Roenisch, 

T. McC. Wade, R. L. Watts. 

HOCKEY BASKETBALL 

Captain — E. J. M. Huycke. Captain — H. French. 

Vice-Captain— P. C. Dobell. ^ ViceCaptain—W. J. A. Toole. 

GYM. SQUASH 

Captain — D. M. O'Grady. Captain — E. Howard. 

Vice-Captain — J. G. Gibson. 

THE LIBRARY 

Librarian — G. D. White; Assistant — H. A. Lamb 

Carnegie Room — J. R. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle 

Used Book Room— I. B. Campbell, R. W. S. Robertson 

Lights Boys — H. P. Goodbody, P. L. Goering, R. M. Merry 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Mar. 3 Little Big-Four Squash Tournament in Toronto. 

9 T.C.S. wins Eastern Ontario Juvenile Hockey 
Championship. 

11 Canon W. W. Judd speaks in Chapel. 

14-16 Gymnasium Competitions. 

17 Little Big-Four Swimming Meet in Toronto. 

18 Flight Lieut, the Rev. H. N. Taylor speaks in 

Chapel. 
19-24 Boxing Competition. 
21 Two period tests begin. 

T.C.S. wins Provincial Semi-Finals, O.M.H.A. 

24 Confirmation Service: The Right Rev. Derwyn 

T. Owen, Archbishop of Toronto and Pri- 
mate of all Canada. 

25 Palm Sunday: Choral Celebration. 
28 Fifth Month's Marks. 

Easter Holidays begin. 

Apr. 9 School Dance. 

11 Trinity Term begins. 



Prayer in Use in the Chapel for Old Boys 
on Active Service 

O Almighty God, who art wiser than the 
children of men and overrulest all things to their 
good, hold, we beseech Thee, in Thy keeping all 
who have gone forth to battle for our caibse, 
especially those from this School: watch over 
those that are missing : comfort and protect those 
in the hands of the enemy. Be with them in the 
hour of danger, strengthen them in the hour of 
weakness, sustain and comfort them in the hour 
of sickness or of death. Grant that they may be 
true to their calling and true always to Thee, 
and make both them and us to be strong to do our 
duty in Thy service, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. 

ACTIVE SERVICE LIST 

Additions, Promotions and Corrections, April, 1945 

1925-26 AHEARN, T. T., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1924-28 ARCHIBALD, R. L., Major, the Black Watch 
(R.H.R.) of Canada. 

1909-12 BAKER, C. E.,Capt., R.C.A. (Demobilized). 

1937-44 BEAMENT, J. A., Tpr., Armoured Corps. 

1936-39 BEST, G. H., Lieut., R.E. 

1905-10 BETHUNE, R. T., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Demo- 
bilized) . 

1936-40 BLACK, W. B., F/0, R.C.A.F. (Demobilized). 

1929-33 BRADEN, W. G., Major, R.C.E.M.E. 

1912-13 BROUGHALL, J. H. S., Major, the Irish Regt. 
of Canada. 

1924-26 CAPE, J. M., M.B.E., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 

1934-35 CROMBIE, M. G., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1939-41 CtTLVER, D. M., 2nd Lieut., the Black Watch 
(R.H.R.) of Canada. 

1927-34 CUTTEN, W. H., P/0, R.C.A.F. (DemobUized) . 

1938-41 DALTON, W. B., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1916-20 DeLOM, T. C. B., F/L, R.A.F. 



1930-38 FLEMING, A. S, Capt., Can. Field Security. 

1936-39 GIFFEN, P. J., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (Demobnized). 

1926-33 GODSHALL, H. L., Major, U.S. ArtUlery. 

1937-43 GOURLAY, J. N., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1936-41 GREENE, W. E., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1922-27 HEES, G. H., Major, R.C.A. 

1942-44 HUNGERFORD, T. E., P/Q, R.C.A.F. (Demo- 
bilized). 

1923-31 IRVINE, J. A., Capt., R.C.A. 

1939-44 KEYES, R. G., Pte., U.S. Army. 

1922-30 KIRK, C. B. K, Capt, R.C.A.M.C. 

1935-40 LANGMUIR, J. W. C, D.F.C., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 LeBROOY, P. J., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. (Demo- 
bilized). 

1927-37 LOWE, W. B.. O.F.C., London Scottish, R.A. 

1904-11 MACAULAY, N.H., D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., Arm- 
oured Corps. (Demobilized). 

1929-30 MACDONALD, D. K., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1910-13 MACDONALD, D. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Demo- 
bilized). 

1936-39 McIVOR, W. J., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-28 Mcpherson, J. a., Pte., Toronto Scottish 
Regiment. 

1927-29 NOBBS, F. J., Major, Royal Can. Dragoons. 

1938-44 PARKER, E. M., Tpr., Armoured Corps. 

1934-38 PARTRIDGE, D. G., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1933-38 RENISON, G. E., Major, 48th. Highlanders of 
Canada. 

1927-32 ROUGHTON, P. R. W., Major, U.S. Artillery. 

1937-42 RUSSELL, D. K., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1942-43 SHORT, J. W., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1940-42 SMITH. A. A. G., 2nd. Lieut., C.A.T.C. 

1926-32 SOUTHAM, F. M., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1938-39 SPENCER, C. H. A., Capt.. the Irish Regt. of 
Canada. 

1940-42 SULLY, B. A. B.. L.A.C.. R.C.A.F. 

1903-07 WHEELER. Sir E. O., K.B., M.C., Legion of 
Honour, Brig.-Gen., R.E. 

1937-39 WOOD. P. A.. D.F.C., F/O, R.C.A.F. 



Trinity College School Record 

Vol. 48 Triniit College School, Port Hope, April, 1945 No. 4 

Editor-in-Chief P. C. Dobell 

News Editor S. C. Edmonds 

Literary Editor , G. P. N'emon 

Sports EorroR E. McC. Sinclair 

Feature Editor T. McC. Wade 

Business Manager R. C. Paterson 

Assistants H. French, J. B. French, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurnch, 

A. M. Stewart, H. C. Butterfield, J. H. Caldbick, V. Dawson, W. M. 
Dobell, J. W. Dobson, D. A. Decker, J. W. Dumford, F. A. H. Green- 
wood, J. G. Gordon, J. M. Hallward, D. S. Hare, T. Huxley, R. M. 
Kirkpatrick, T. W. Lawson, J. R. Ligertwood, J. D. McDonough, 
M. F. McDowell, P. H. Mdntyre, W. H. Palmer, G. A. H. Pearson, 
R. W. S. Robertson, R. V. S. Smith, J. R. deC. Warner, R. L. Watts. 

F*hotography G. C. Bovaird, R. P. Stokes 

Junior School Record Mr. C. J. Tottenham 

Managing Editor Mr. W. K. Molson 

Treasurer Mr. A. H. N. Snelgrove 



The Record is published six times a year, in the months of October, December, 
February, April, June and August. 



EDITORIALS 

A miniature general election took place in T.C.S. a 
few weeks ago, the purpose of which was lost by many of 
the boys at School. It was hoped that the experience 
gained would be valuable in preparing us for the difficulties 
and dangers that we will certainly meet in actual elections. 
The intention was that boys should form parties, draw up 
platforms and campaign on the merits of these platforms. 
This is the basic procedure in all elections, but in practice 
we observe that it is often the emotional appeal of the 
leader which "swings the vote" rather than the quality of 
the platform. We no longer find the electorate sufficiently 
interested or well enough informed to be able to make the 
difficult decisions required before voting. Besides being a 



2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Stigma on our country, this situation, moreover, forbodes 
potential disaster in the future. For a people may very 
easily elect at the polls a party which does not have the 
best interests of the country at heart, simply through not 
being capable or alert enough to recognize the danger. 

We of T.C.S. were faced with the identical problem to 
that faced by the average Canadian at elections, and we 
showed ourselves to be just as gullible and unthinking; for 
many of us allowed ourselves to be swayed by a purely 
emotional appeal while making no attempt to get at the 
root of the matter before committing ourselves. Admit- 
tedly the elections were held in the spirit of fun, but why 
should we choose to make light of the formal elections, a 
tradition which is the most sacred heritage of democracy? 
For the first time in our lives we were given the oppor- 
tunity in a model election to demonstrate our intelligence 
and understanding, and many of us showed up badly. 

Let us for a moment examine one of the totalitarian 
countries in Europe — Germany, for example. In that 
nation, the electorate, attracted like children by an ap- 
pealing but impossible platform, by party salutes, party 
insignias and party membership, and by the emotional 
appeal of a fanatical and unscrupulous leader, voted into 
power the Nazi Party which is chiefly responsible for the 
Second World War. Further examples abound, and they 
all point to that one cause, the easily influenced public. 
Now, an enlightened population, besides protecting itself 
from being deceived, is certain to have good government 
since it will insist that the parties they elect carry out the 
pledges that they so munificently make at election time. 

Let us now examine and analyse the three parties re- 
presented in the T.C.S. elections. The "Socialists", who 
received the least popular support, had the most thought- 
ful and intelligent programme, and their approach to the 
election was, without doubt, the most serious. They were 
destined to receive very little popular acclaim, however, 
firstly because of the serious nature of their platform, and 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 3 

secondly because they made very little attempt to gain 
supporters. The second party, the "Togas", showed the 
most imagination and industry in advertising themselves 
and, although they acted ludicrously at times, their basic 
approach was serious. But the third party, the "Eleu- 
tharists", who were the most successful, had an entirely 
different outlook. Their appeal, which was certainly well 
directed, was solely to the emotions. To do this, the 
leaders employed salutes and insignias, which practice we 
connect with the totalitarian countries, and their plat- 
form, such as it was, was directed almost entirely to- 
wards the enticement of more party members. But, so 
vigorously did they institute this policy that their followers 
got out-of-hand and they found it difficult to exert any 
control over them. This, we feel, is the constant danger 
faced by the leaders of any party whose appeal is based 
on an emotional attraction only, for at any moment the 
members may break loose and "run berserk". 

The great drawback of the School election was the 
lack of all incentive, since the purpose was purely academic, 
but as events turned out, the novelty of the scheme obvia- 
ted any necessity for it. There are certainly some lessons 
we can learn, however, no matter how unsuccessful we 
consider the elections to have been. For, under examina- 
tion, we discover that the outcome was to a considerable 
extent just as it would have been in a real election. And 
so we have a wonderful example of the strength of the 
emotional appeal and the weakness of a purely intellectual 
approach; it is this fact that makes us fear for the future. 

It has been maintained again and again that boys in 
this School will become the future leaders of Canada. Yet 
if we, who are supposed to be intelligent youths, are so 
easily attracted by an emotional appeal, how can we expect 
the thousands of boys who do not have the same oppor- 
tunities of learning to vote with wisdom and understand- 
ing? It is up to us to profit by this remarkable and self- 
evident example of our own gullibility, and to determine 



4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

that in the future we shall endeavour to vote only after we 
have given our every consideration to the respective merits 
of the parties involved. 

— P.C.D. 



The School team has won a hockey title for the first 
time in its history and we are justly proud of it. We are 
now Juvenile Champions of Eastern Ontario and are con- 
tinuing into the Provincial semi-finals. Twice before the 
School has entered an Ontario League, in 1915 and 1944, 
but never have we been so successful. 

Some maintain that the First Hockey Team of 1945 is 
the best that the School has ever had; others are not so 
vehement in their praise. But all agree that the players 
have as much fight and drive as any they have ever seen. 
Several factors have contributed to the success of the team. 
Every boy is determined to do his best at all times and 
there is never any easing of the pressure; there are no in- 
dividual stars and each man has grown to depend com- 
pletely upon his team-mate; a friendship exists between 
the players which has developed only after a maximum of 
three years of comradeship together at School. Win or 
lose in the future, these characteristics will always be 
associated with the team, and when, in the years to come, 
members of the squad chance to meet each other, they will 
immediately be drawn together by pleasant recollections 
of a wonderful season of hockey. 

We make no apology for the number of pages devoted 
to hockey in this issue, since we feel that the successes 
achieved by our First Team justify the dedication of this 
number to a team we shall all remember. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




CHAPELSiENOTES 



Shew Thyself A Man 

On Sunday, February 11, the Reverend J. M. Crisali, 
Rector of St. John's Church, Port Hope, spoke in the 
Chapel at Evensong. Taking Winston Churchill as an ex- 
ample, he dwelt at some length on the importance of moral 
as_ well as physical courage, and pointed out that not all 
those who show great courage in time of battle, danger, 
or emergency have the sort of courage to stand up for 
truth and Christ against great odds. The latter required, 
he said, a different sort of courage, and both types are 
necessary in life. Only when we see moral and physical 
courage combined can we believe that God made man in 
His own image. 

Mr. Crisali closed his sermon with the words of King 
David to his son Solomon, which are to be found in the 
First Book of Kings, chapter two, verse two: "Shew Thy- 
self a Man". 



The Power of the Holy Spirit 

On Sunday, February 18, the Chaplain chose as his 
text: "Ye shall receive power after that the Holy Ghost 
is come upon you". He pointed out that our world has 
been given power far beyond the dreams of previous 
generations, but we have used that power toward our own 
destruction. How then could we be trusted with more? 



6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Would we use it for good or evil? He stated that the 
problem was a very personal one, and that it would be to 
the most humble, to the most prepared to receive it, and 
to the most willing to be guided by it, that the power of 
the Holy Spirit would be given. "He that believeth in Me, 
out of him shall flow the spring of living water to make 
glad our better world." 



Human Characteristics in the Bird 

On Sunday, March 4, the Chaplain spoke at Evensong, 
his sermon being directed principally towards the younger 
members of the School. Taking his text from the second 
chapter of Canticles — "The time of the singing of the birds 
is come" — he drew a comparison between the various types 
of birds and various human characteristics, beginning with 
the industrious wren, and working through to the familiar, 
friendly sparrow. 



The Need for Reform in Canada 

On Sunday. March 11. Canon W. W. Judd, Director of 
Social Services for the Anglican Church in Canada, spoke 
in Chapel concerning the dire need for social reform in this 
country. He has had the opportunity of visiting almost 
every penitentiary in Canada, and he said that great im- 
provement was needed in this sphere, urging that the pre- 
sent system be abolished in favour of something along the 
British line of re-education for criminals. 

Canada, he next remarked, was faced with the con- 
troversial question of our citizens of Japanese extraction. 
He suggested that they be accorded the full rights and 
privileges associated with citizenship, for only in that way, 
he felt, would the existing stalemate be overcome. 

Turning to the problem of refugees, Canon Judd re- 
minded us that England, when in dreadful need in 1940. 
opened her doors to many thousands of refugees of every 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 7 

nationality. Why then, he asked, does Canada, with its 
great, undeveloped resources, close its gates to those who 
have lost their homes? 

These three problems, the preacher concluded, must be 
solved, not only with a view toward common sense, but 
also in a manner befitting Christian justice. 






TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

NOTES 

Shooting Distinction 

A short time ago a letter was received from the 
District Cadet Officer amiouncing that Trinity College 
School had once again placed first in the Dominion in the 
Imperial Challenge Shield shoot. It also stated that with 
our score of 95.28 we should place high in the Empire. 
Last year was the fourth consecutive year that the School 
has won the Duke of Devonshire Trophy. 

This year's score of 92.873, although not as good as 
that of last year, is higher than our score of 91.9 in 1943 
when T.C.S. came first in the Empire. Lieutenant Batt 
was rewarded for the results of last year with a King's 
Silver Medal, not the first of his accumulation by any 
means. Vernon and Butterfield ii are to be congratulated 
for their scores of 100 in the most recent shoot, for which 
they will receive King's Silver Medals. 



Mr. Dickson-Kenwin 



The School spent an extremely interesting and enter- 
taining evening on February 5, when Mr. Dickson-Kenwin 
presented a series of dramatic sketches in the Hall. He 
devoted the first halt of his programme to portraying 
various scenes from Shakespeare and Dickens. The most 
notable among these were the death of Cardinal Wolsey 
from "King Henry VIII". and Sydney Carton's famous 
passage " 'Tis a far better thing that I do now than I have 
ever done before." 




THH HOCKH^' TEAM, 1945 
Birck Ron-. — The Headmaster, D. H. Roenisch, D. A. Davidson, G. L. Robarts, 

G. A. H. Pearson, R. A. Hope, Mr. Hodgetts. 
Front Row: — V. Dawson, J. R. McMurrich, E. Howard, E. J. M. Huycke (Capt.), 

P. C. Dobell, E. McC. Sinclair, P. L. Gilbert, T. S. Fennell. 




o . 

5 a. 

re o 

QX 



c 
S s 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 

Mr. Dickson-Ken win's versatility was especially ap- 
preciated during the latter part of the programme when 
he presented a number of after-dinner speeches which were 
delivered at a meeting of the Society for Providing Blankets 
and Top-boots for the Natives of the Cannibal Islands. The 
honoured guest, the "oily" treasurer, and the pompous 
chairman were all portrayed in turn. The performance 
closed with some very amusing and realistic sound effects, 
among the most remarkable of which were Mr. Dickson- 
Kenwin's efforts to catch a fly. We sincerely hope that 
he will be back to visit us again. 

The programme follows: — 

Jacques — ("All the world's a stage") — 

from "As You Like It" 
Macbeth — ("Is this a dagger which I see before me?") — 

from "Macbeth" 
Cardinal Wolsey— ("The Death Scene")— 

from "King Henry VIH" 

Hamlet— ("To be or not to be") from "Hamlet" 

Sir John Falstaff from "Many Wives of Wisdom" 

Mr. Micawber and Uriah Heep from "David Copperfield" 

Scrooge from "A Christmas Carol" 

Sydney Carton from "A Tale of Two Cities" 



Choir Whole 



On Monday, February 5, the members of the Choir, 
actors and stagehands in the Christmas entertainment, 
and other boys who had performed useful tasks around the 
School, were rewarded for their efforts with a whole holi- 
day. As might have been expected, the day had been care- 
fully planned the evening before, and it was announced at 
breakfast that one end of the Head table had challenged 
the other in hockey, and that the game would be played 
on the town rink during the morning. Most of the School 



10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

trooped down to watch the mad scramble which ensued. 
The teams ("Toujours la politesse") were fairly evenly 
matched and the final score was close. 



Pancake Toss 



The annual pancake toss took place as usual this year 
on Shrove Tuesday, February 13. This custom, which 
originated at Westminster School in England during the 
seventeenth century, has been practised at T.C.S. since 
1914 when the two schools were affiliated in this tradition. 

The eleven contestants, one from each form and Cox i. 
a blacksheep representing the Prefects, formed in a line 
with their backs to the starter, Mr. Grace. From the very 
second the pancake besplattered the gymnasium floor, the 
onlookers became one surging, seething mass, at first sway- 
ing inward toward the contestants and then reeling back- 
wards again to cries of "Hey. you! Stop pushing" and 
"C'mon! Give 'em air!" The free-for-all lasted an inter- 
minable three minutes after which the final whistle was 
blown. 

O'Grady of 5B finished first with seventeen ounces 
and received the customary five dollars with which to treat 
his class at tuck. Cox i, placing second with eleven ounces, 
was followed at a respectful distance by brother Bill of 5C 
with six ounces. What became of the rest of the putty is 
simply a matter of conjecture, but we strongly suspect 
Cox i, who, fighting without the benefit of his powerful 
lenses, probably at first mistook it for a real pancake. 



Mrs. Phoebe Erskine McKeller 

The School was greatly honoured on February 23 by 
a visit of the celebrated Shakespearian actress, Mrs. Phoebe 
Erskine McKeller. Using the dais of the Hall as the stage, 
Mrs. McKeller first explained the basis of the plot in "The 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 11 

Merchant of Venice", and then very ably acted out the 
more important scenes, providing interesting explanations 
as she proceeded. 

After a short intermission, she returned to gi\e a 
similar treatment to "Macbeth". The performances of both 
plays were much enjoyed by members of the Jimior and 
Senior Schools, and we look forward to a further visit in 
the future. 



Visit of Dr. Berger 



The School was privileged to have as a visitor over 
the week-end of February 23-25 Dr. David Berger, formerly 
from Poland, now residing in Montreal. Dr. Berger lived 
in Krakow until the Nazi invasion of 1939 when he was 
forced to leave the country. During his stay he gave a 
most interesting and informative talk to the Political 
Science Club on the history of Russo-Polish relations, clear- 
ing up many wrong impressions and prejudices. 

The School enjoyed hearing from Dr. Berger and sin- 
cerely hopes that he will pay us another visit. 



Visit of Mr. Davidson 



On February 27, Mr. W. J. Davidson, Vice-President of 
General Motors, gave a talk to the School on the mechani- 
cal inventions of the war. 

Mr. Davidson himself was in France in 1940, but on 
the fall of that country he joined the staff of the British 
Purchasing Commission. In the course of his work, he 
was sent to North Africa, and on his return furnished 
valuable information which led to the development of new 
tanks and armoured vehicles. Concerning the invasion of 
Europe, he paid tribute to the British invention of the arti- 
ficial ports, and revealed that the success of the landings 
was largely due to American-made, amphibious vehicles. 
In concluding his talk, Mr. Davidson stated that the Allies 



12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

now hold a marked superiority over the Germans in the 
value of their technical inventions, especially in naval and 
air warfare. After his speech, he showed us an official 
newsreel depicting the second naval battle of the Philip- 
pines. It was a most vivid and intimate picture of an air 
sea battle. 

We wish to thank Mr. Davidson for his very informa- 
tive talk, and we sincerely hope that he will visit us again 
at the earliest opportunity. 



Half-Holiday 



On Thursday, March 8, a half -holiday was declared in 
honour of Mrs. Ketchum's birthday. Littleside Hockey 
took advantage of the occasion to play their annual House 
game. 



General Election 



On March 8, a general election was held in order to 
form a miniature government in the School, which, it was 
felt, might stimulate interest in debates on subjects of 
national interest, give experience to the boys in the draw- 
ing up and criticizing of political platforms, and demon- 
strate the problems of voting. 

Three parties emerged from a week of hectic cam- 
paigning, which included a torch-light parade, massed 
meetings and the distribution of leaflets. In the vote, the 
"Eleutharists" were elected and this party is currently in 
power. The "Togas" represent the Opposition, while the 
"Socialists" must wait for their turn to come. 

Under the present scheme, every boy has a seat in 
parliament, and the party in power, under the leadership 
of a three-man cabinet, must undertake to debate its plat- 
form successfully against the Opposition. The party that 
loses is succeeded by the next most powerful party, and so 
the circle continues. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 

In some respects the election was a success; in others 
it was not. It did give the boys an introduction to the 
procedure involved, and some of the dangers were most 
forcibly demonstrated for those who took the trouble to 
observe them. It certainly proved a popular diversion as 
can be illustrated by the fact that all but five boys exercised 
their franchise. 



Stop-Press 

The Hockey Team, playing as Eastern Champions, de- 
feated Pawassan Juveniles, Northern Champions, in a sud- 
den-death game at Oshawa Arena on Wednesday, March 
21; the final score was 9-3. 

Advancing to the Provincial Finals of the O.M.H.A., 
the School now plays the winner between Lucknow and 
Welland. 



Valete 

Murray, J. C— Form IVA (1). 

Scott, C. J.— Form IVA (1); Littleside Basketball; Little- 
side Soccer; Littleside Cricket; Choir; Sacristan; 
Used Book Room. 




14 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




S CHOP L 

O r S AT E S 



Machinery and Human Progress 

The third debate of the school year was held in Hall 
on February 10. The motion before the House read: "Re- 
solved that the further development of machinery will be- 
come a menace to human well-being". Hope, Wigle and 
Ligertwood upheld the affirmative, while Dobell i, Pater- 
son i and Pearson i supported the negative. Vernon occu- 
pied the speaker's chair, and Mr. Bagley was cajoled into 
becoming judge. 

Hope initiated proceedings with a cleverly worded 
and picturesque, almost satirical, account of the war ma- 
chine of the future — a terrifying realization of our most 
ghastly dreams. 

Dobell countered with innumerable examples of the 
beneficial use to which machines have been put in the past, 
and questioned the wisdom of retarding their further de- 
velopment. 

Wigle, second to speak for the affirmative, outlined 
the machine's future role in society, and forecast great 
waves of unemployment and depression. 

Paterson, continuing along Dobell's reasoning, de- 
voted himself to the part played by machines in medicine 
and agriculture. 

Ligertwood deplored the fact that machines are rapid- 
ly exhausting our natural resources, and dealt for some 
time on industrial accidents. 

Pearson i. the last speaker, applied the remarks of his 
coUeagues to the future. He pointed out that man's mind 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 

will increase in intellectual growth in proportion to the 
machine's growth, and that as the former has always con- 
trolled the latter in the past, there is no reason to doubt 
that it will continue to do so. 

After a number of speeches from the floor, Mr. Bagiey 
arose to pass judgment. He gave the debate to the nega- 
tive on the basis of points raised and better delivery. Dobell 
and Paterson, he said, contributed more than Hope and 
Wigle respectively, while Pearson and Ligertwood spoke 
equally well. The House showed itself to be in agreement 
with this decision by a substantial majority. 



Hou9e-^Note§ 



BETHUNE 

It is the year 1995. A glittering rocket ship is shoot- 
ing through the stratosphere, journeying from Ottawa, 
Canada, to Ottawa, Canada. The express purpose for 
such a peculiar journey is to add a touch of novelty to the 
reunion dinner of the Bethune House, bottom-flat T.C.S. 
Old Boys who reigned supreme therein during the school 
year 1944-45. As we fade into the picture, a stout, portly 
gentleman with a red face, his pudgy fingers hooked into 
the pockets of his waistcoat, is rising from the dinner table 
to address the gentlemen seated around him. He is Mr. 
E. J. M. Huycke, Esq., prosperous Toronto manufacturer 
of paddles, bracelets, letter openers, weight reducing ma- 
chines, etc. etc. 

Mr. Huycke, waiting for the confused babble to die 
down, (which it does after ten minutes) begins as follows: 
"Gentlemen, (loud boos) it is my very great pleasure to 



16 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

welcome you all here (catcalls) Uh-h-h-h what I mean is 
that I'm really glad to see you all again — Uh-h-h-h and 
it's — well — it's nice to see you." Mr.Huycke sits down in 
great confusion midst loud cheers and hangings of the 
table, turning a slight purple, but otherwise managing to 
appear normal. 

He is followed by an extremely well dressed individual 
at the other end of the table, who quickly slips a comb 
through his hair, adjusts his tie, pats his handkerchief 
into place and rises to his feet, pulling out a sheaf of notes 
and assembling various dictionaries around him. He is His 
Excellency, the Rt. Hon. Mr. P. C. Dobell, B.A., Canadian 
representative to the recently discovered South Sea island 
of Uwongi. Mr. Dobell, pounding lightly on the table with 
a sledge hammer, achieves the required silence and yells 
as follows: 

"My Friends — The thing is that — ", — at this point the 
speaker's hair settles back into its original position of 
covering the ears and the back of the neck. Such a 
phenomenon not having been seen for fifty years, there is 
immediate turmoil and confusion, and Canada's representa- 
tive to Uwongi, after pocketing his notes, closing his dic- 
tionaries, combing his hair, adjusting his tie and patting 
his handkerchief, sits down hurriedly. 

The after-dinner speeches continue. Mr. Harry Ches- 
ter Tavarorichininy (it is rumoured that he changed his 
name), eminent conductor and triangle expert of the 
Beavertown, N.W. Territories symphony orchestra, who 
has frequently left the table in order to wash his face, now 
makes an extremely witty and doubtfully humorous little 
speech that is roundly applauded by three gentlemen, Mr. 
Phippen, Mr. Greig and Mr. Austin, who assume once more, 
upon its conclusion, their former positions of somnambu- 
lance under the table. These three gentlemen have only 
obtained permission to attend the dinner through the 
generosity of the Headmaster of T.C.S., at which institu- 
tion they are still striving to pass their Middle School 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 1? 

latin. Upon being questioned, they report that they are 
progressing favourably. 

Next to rise is Mr. H. C. D. Cox, once a fashionable 
Bermuda playboy, before that island disappeared into the 
ocean, and now editor of "Eskimo Humour", a weekly 
periodical designed to relieve the monotony that Eskimoes 
undergo during the winter months. Needless to say, the 
humour does not have to be of a particularly high order. 
Mr. Cox, after making an especially fine speech on the 
merits of the West Indian Negroes, bows profusely three 
or four times, and resumes his seat, midst a deathly silence, 
broken only by the tremendous whirr of the rocket ship's 
fifty million pony power motor, invented and perfected by 
Sir James Matthews, K.C.B.E., who is attending the dinner. 

The silence does not last long. After the effect of 
Mr. Cox's sparkling humour has died off, "Scoop" Ed- 
monds, roving reporter for the "Stratosphere Daily" re- 
sumes once more the pounding of his typewriter in a corner 
of the room. Mr. T. McC. Wade continues his rendition 
on the Chinese cymbals of "I hate you", present top of the 
"Hit and Run Parade" while Colonel-General "Wein" 
Warner, head of the American rocket force, accompanies 
with a gypsy dance routine. On the other side of the table 
we perceive Dr. J. Gordon Gibson, medico extroardinaire, 
and perpetrator of the human monster "Gibbonstein". 
which is only allowed out of its cell to indulge in friendly 
wrestling bouts with its master. This worthy gentleman 
seems to be proudly displaying a set of rubber teeth, latest 
thing on the tooth market, to a group of sympathetic 
admirers. 

But hush! Another speech is to be made. Focussing 
our glasses, we perceive a tall, well built, young looking 
man, for all his age, rapping on his spittoon for silence. 
On inquiring we learn that it is the Right Rev. G. P. H. 
Vernon, S.O.S., F.A., of the Society for Unintentional 
Suicides. There seems to be some agitation on the Rev.'s 
part for a scratch suffered by Dr. Gibson when that stal- 



IS TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

wart nervously broke his fork in half, but friends quickly 
manage to calm him. After a very exciting speech by our 
mutual friend on the merits of passing algebra, we awake 
once more to find ourselves in the middle of a fast and 
furious blackjack game. On our left, George Laing, 
"Rusty" Robarts, inventor of the Robarts' sling for pro- 
truding abdominal regions, is watching the dealer closely. 
This worthy we recognize as F. A. H. Greenwood, Esq., 
President of the St. Catharines' Pee-Wee Tiddleywink's 
Association, and a well-known participator in local chain- 
smoking contests. On the President's right, smoking a 
Turkish cheroot and glancing through back numbers of 
Hansard, sits the Hon. Robert Paterson, K.C., leader of the 
Toga Party in the Hudson Bay region. Rounding out this 
little foursome is "Holly-burr" French, internationally 
famous women's stocking designer, who is rumoured to 
have insured his legs for 1,000,000 dollars. 

And so the evening passes, until the room is thick 
with smoke and Mr. James "Stick" McMurrich, the man 
behind the new mark IV star corset button, is almost 
finished his serial in the "Sunday Morning Hang-Over". 
More and more dim shapes slide under the table; fewer and 
fewer remain able to pay their dinner fees to Mr. Douglas 
Hare, Churchwarden of St. Trinity's. Port Hope, who in 
vain endeavours to thrust little white collection envelopes 
before their bleary eyes. Soon, all is quiet in the great 
ship, speeding from Ottawa, Canada, to Ottawa, Canada, 
and the members of the bottom flat Bethune in the year 
1944-45 live again the pleasures and fears they enjoyed in 
that year, long ago. 

.A.H.P. 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 

BRENT 

In most house notes one finds that they are written 
by someone violently prejudiced one way or another, but 
this year Brent, most of her loyal sons working hard to 
achieve glory m various fields of endeavour at T.C.S., has 
asked that famous neutral observer Joe Blow, one time old 
boy of Trinity, to review the two houses. He did a thorough 
job, taking all factors into account, and after much de- 
liberation made his reply. Here is his full report: — 

"It was hard to compare the qualities of the masters, 
but I finally arrived at a conclusion. Brent has the human 
adding machine and the rugby, hockey, basketball, swim- 
ming and track coach. The man who knows practically 
every language, and uses them all on occasion, runs Be- 
thune House, and is ably supported by our R.K. technician. 
However, in the characters of the boys we find an amazing 
difference. Brent House has an unlimited number of genii. 
Where else can one find the man who never loses an argu- 
ment, the twin boys Roger and George with the common 
quality of never missing a trick, and the perpetual cloud 
of smoke with a nose on it? 

"To develop the argument further we must look 
deeper. Psychology is up Allen's alley but no one can 
figure out how he lives at night and sleeps all day. There 
is the week-end worker Wilson with his running mate Hart 
Drew, jumping-jive Rich and Ching Long, proprietor of the 
Brent House Laundry, muscle-bound Mike and little Nels 
Stewart, successor to the hockey's great, the amateur 
photographer. Prof. Stokes, and Gillan who is Brent's Thin 
Man. The zoo has representatives with Bugs Bunny, Fish, 
and Lamb. 

"And so it goes ; everywhere I looked I saw some new 
characteristic that appealed to me. Squash or tennis 
racquets, paddles or hockey sticks, all found themselves at 
home in the able hands of thirty-minute Howard, while 
hurdling over all obstacles we find Trinity's new star to re- 



20 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

place Alan Ford — Hubie, one-second-to-the-pool-record-Sin- 
clair, starring in all sports. 

"Marks are nothing to Brent boys as they are fighting 
it out in a close race for top, and we find nothing Dinky 
in the way they handle the love-life either. Advice is free- 
ly dispensed from 102 with John Anthony Davidson giving 
it for a nominal fee. The younger generation of Brent 
boys finds a bright future for Brent with Magee cup Gum- 
ming and genius J. Williamson. 

"Thus, I saw a galaxy of stars and was dazzled by 
their brilliance. Bethune contained a good bunch of boys 
but could not touch this magnificence, and I seem to have 
mislaid my summary of them. Anyhow, Brent was ad- 
judged to be of superior quality throughout. 

"Yours sincerely, Joe Blow. 

P.S. — We have been telling you this for years . . . Brent". 



y^ 







MISS E. M. SMITH 
(T.C.S. 1924- 1944) 





f4 




MASTERS vs. SENIORS 





Pictures by R. P. Stokes 
THE SKI PATROL 



TRINITY COULEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



21 



Contributions 




WHEN IT RAINS 

The rain! It races drop on drop, from top 

To bottom of the window frame; but whence 

Doth come this fruitful due? From out there, hence, 

From up beyond the clouds: where do they stop? — 

The heavens, I mean. It almost frightens me 

To think of that unending void where all 

The weather has its start: the summers, fall, 

The winters, spring, are all controlled, we see, 

From out the blue — a bureau, far above 

The earth. We cannot fathom wonders such 

As are concealed up there: could we but touch, 

An instant even, the heart of all God's love, 

What should we see? — the rain commencing its 

Prolonged, yet brief, gyrations down to earth? — 

The Angel Gabriel, horn in hand, the dearth 

Of entering clearly shown, conducting chits 

Within the gates? — the Saints themselves? — what else 

We'd see I cannot say. The human brain, 

Unable as it is to ascertain 

The mysteries outside our orbit, dwells 

In darkness . . . See what rain, when running down 

A window pane, can do! You n'er have seen? 

Then try, when next it rains, just try. The sheen 

From off the glass will stimulate a frown, 



22 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

You'll think, and then you'll see; you'll form 
Your own sweet thoughts, and then you'll see, 
Anew, how life is lived: you will foresee 
The way to live; you will your life transform. 

— J.R.L. 



THE PEARL DIVER 



The rough, awkward canoe rolled gently in the calm 
ocean just inside the reefs, about a mile from shore. Maiku 
raised himself lightly onto the gunwhaies and, filling his 
lungs till his diaphragm swelled, tipped himself off balance 
and plunged down. 

At fifty feet he let himself sink to the bottom, and 
ran his brown fingers through the mud and sand of the 
ocean floor. The water about him was green and as clear 
as crystal. Here, he knew, there was nothing to worry 
about. It was too deep for coral snakes, and the sharks 
roamed outside the reefs. Apart from the occasional 
tempting but spiny and poisonous plant, there was nothing 
to look out for. His fingers closed on an oyster. In a 
moment he had pried it open with thin, wiry fingers to find 
only the flesh of the animal. He released his hold on the 
branch of twisted coral and, with plenty of air left, floated 
to the surface. He was not disappointed, for he knew that 
very seldom did anyone find a pearl of any value inside 
the reefs. 

Breaking the surface, he lifted himself into the canoe 
with his companions, and there, resting in the shade of 
the thatched shelter, he allowed his mind to drift back. 
He realized that he was poor and had no social standing 
amongst the white men of the isles. The only means of 
feeding himself and his family was to keep on diving. But 
he knew, too, the eventual outcome of his profession. He 
had once seen a boy. who. trapped by some giant clam, 
and nearly drowning, wheezed his best breaths into lungs 
broken by his will to live. He further knew that diving 



TRINITY COLl^EGE SCHOOL RECORD 23 

to a depth which would crack an impracticed man's ear- 
drums eventually made all native divers deaf. 

He watched the expressions of the divers as they broke 
the surface. Once in a long while one would scramble, 
brown and gleaming, over the side and roll a glowing white 
pearl from one hand to the other, as the rest would crowd 
enviously around him. He had himself been lucky in the 
last week, finding quite a large pearl which he had had to 
sell to the white men, the only ones who would buy them, 
for a ridiculously low price. Inside the reefs the floor of 
the ocean was nearly void of treasure. It was sometimes 
so stirred up by the many divers that it had to be left to 
settle. 

A thought preyed upon his mind; no one really knew 
what lay outside the reefs. The old men of his island, wise 
but penniless, said that there was great danger outside the 
reefs along the bottom. Tales were sometimes told — fan- 
tastic tales — of friends and relatives who had tried to 
fathom the secret depths and had never come back. To 
him superstition was a curse, yet he was imaginative 
enough to be afraid. 

The hot sun turned from yellow to red, floating silently 
around the edge of the ocean, as the men lazily followed 
their long shadows shoreward. The darkest and most 
stormy nights held no sleeplessness for Maiku, but that 
night he never stopped tossing. Even when he would doze 
off for a minute, his dreams would wake him. 

Early in the dawn, almost before the sun had again 
returned, a figure slipped past the fringe of leaning palms 
that distinguished sea from land, and, with a set purpose, 
ran a heavy canoe across the first hundred yards of water 
and jumped in. Maiku's thoughts darted quickly from one 
thing to another. With five of the greatest pearls, he 
could gain enough to last him to the end of his days. He 
thought of how foolish he was, chancing his life, but then 
he thought of the present and unconsciously worked his 
arms more quickly. 



24 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL. RECORD 

Alighting on one of the reefs or semi-islands, and 
tying the canoe, he set about preparing himself. Courage 
nearly failed him on glancing at the thin, gleaming length 
of steel he had forced himself to bring. He looked back 
at the cool green of the island, so tempting in the early 
hours. Determined, he swung around and, tying a small 
leather sack to his belt, again launched the canoe, this time 
towards the open sea. 

He paddled till he found himself in the lee of the reefs. 
Knowing that the ocean floor here slanted towards the deep 
at a steep angle, Maiku dived in one hundred yards from 
the reefs to test the depth; he found it was only thirty 
feet. The real pearl oysters, he knew, were nearer seventy 
feet, so he paddled for another quarter of a mile and rested. 
His canoe was rimning in the choppy grey waves, excited 
by the cool breeze of the half dawn. 

Fear tightened the muscles in his throat, and he jump- 
ed to his feet, afraid lest he should be driven from his pur- 
pose. Poised for a moment on the bow of the canoe, he 
plunged. With lungs filled, he floated down with long, 
even strokes. Though slim and narrow of body, Maiku 
had a great depth of chest, something acquired by divers 
over a period of time. The grey water pressed on him 
when he sank past sixty feet, and something seemed to 
bum in his brain if he kept his eyes open for too long. The 
sickly green ocean floor showed itself when he thought he 
wa? too deep to stand the pressure. With smooth, un- 
hurried movements he searched the bottom. Time after 
time his fingers furtively dropped the black oysters into 
the sack at his belt. But the pressure could not be with- 
stood for too long; soon the pulses in his ears roared like 
breakers in a squall. Turning upward, he thrust against 
the bottom, and, opening wide his arms, swept them past 
his body, racing for air and life. 

Then he saw it. Black, but contrasting strangely with 
the grey, he saw the shark. The water sent its image, 
blurred and rippled, to his eyes; and he could tell by the 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 25 

sudden, vicious gliding movement that it had seen him. 
The shark is a coward; there is no animal that is more 
easily frightened, or less rightly deserves the title of man- 
eater. This shark was curious, and followed. With a 
great effort, he drew his legs up to his chest, to press 
harder on the water that held him prisoner. A sharp pain 
sent a running flash of panic through his brain. On draw- 
ing his legs against his chest, he had driven the knife at 
his belt through sheath and flesh, an inch into his thigh. 
He knew what this would mean. Pressing his thumb 
against the wound, he tried to stop the flow, but it drifted 
between his fingers and sent the animal, below his strain- 
ing body, darting up after him. A few feet below the 
surface the blood in his head almost forced his eyelids 
closed, but he broke through and sucked into his lungs the 
life-giving air. 

While racing to the surface, he had judged instinctive- 
ly the position of his canoe, but the waves had drifted it 
out some fifty feet, and his clawing fingers fell back into 
the sea. Many think that in order to bite properly a shark 
must turn its belly to the sky. Any islander knows that 
a shark, excited by blood, will grasp from any angle the 
body of a victim and, with saw-like teeth, cut off his limbs 
till his struggles cease. But an islander is also taught how 
to avoid the rush of a shark. This man knew that he 
could not swim even those fifty feet before the beast 
would be on him, so he drew his knife and, turning, 
watched. 

No fin betrayed its movements, but suddenly the 
water heaved close to him. Turning on his back, Maiku 
twisted himself under by an all-embracing stroke of his 
powerful arms. He felt the soft belly of the animal brush 
against his leg; he jabbed the knife upwards. The cold 
flesh of the fish fell down the hilt of the dagger across his 
hand, and a thin, red stream slipped away from its side to 
be threshed into scarlet-flecked foam by the last throes 
of its great taU. 



26 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

This man, an insignificant native diver, was that day 
changed. He no longer had to dive; he could live out his 
days in peace. He was the talk of the island all that night, 
and till very late people came to see his prizes and to ad- 
mire them. Before he went to sleep, Maiku looked at them 
again. Even in the dancing half-light of the fires they 
still glowed far more brightly than the stars above his 
head. 

— G.B.T. 



IN MEMORIAM 



A piece of wood may mark your grave, 

With shells and bullets whistling overhead, 

And you who gave your lives the world to save 

Have joined the legions of the honoured dead. 

And o'er the ground 'neath which you lie. 

Soldiers who march to 'venge your death 

Cease singing as your grave they now pass by. 

And comrades curse the foe beneath their breath. 

And you who, from this School, have paid the price 

In battles fierce by land or air or sea, 

Who made the greatest human sacrifice. 

Accept this simple epitaph from me: 

"O! rest in peace, you men of valour and of might, 

Who died while striving wrongs to right." 

— D.M.A 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 27 

BV THE DEPTH OF THE SILENCES 

There was not a sound in the upper air. Only the 
brilliant, blue vault of Heaven, centred by a fiery, burning 
sun, gazed down on the wilderness below. Vast stretches 
of forest land, like a hugh green blanket, interspersed here 
and there by deep blue patches, joined by ribbons of silver, 
were all that lay below the blinding heat rays. Up into 
this living silence, for so it seemed, a tiny speck climbed 
slowly. Lifted by powerful wings, the bald eagle, sole 
denizen of the wild that ever ventured to these forbidden 
heights, soon reached the upper air, and turned to gaze 
downwards from whence it had so effortlessly climbed. 
Only the slight hissing of air through the wing-feathers 
served to disturb the tremendous silence. With beady 
eyes fixed intently below, the eagle slowly drifted, wheeling 
majestically through the heavens. 

Far, far below, in one of the deep blue patches that 
lay directly under the great bird's gaze, there reigned an- 
other silence, as complete as that above. Twenty feet be- 
low the surface, gently waving its delicate fins, a huge pike 
droused sleepily, digesting the rather heavy meal of pic- 
kerel fry that it had just consumed. A yellow-green light 
pervaded the water at this depth, encompassing everything 
with its sickly luminosity. It was always so at mid-day, 
when the rays of the sun were at their strongest and seem- 
ed to reach into the very darkest pool, driving the fish be- 
fore them. This particular pike was quite content to rest 
before the entrance of a pool rather darker than others, 
for the soothing, greenish light pleased him. Besides, he 
had nothing to fear; there was no fish to compare with 
him in the whole lake. He basked in the light and in the 
silence, a silence that twenty feet of water pressed into a 
deep and brooding stillness. 

A little to the north of the particular lake in which 
the pike lay basking, and over which the eagle soared, a 
great cedar swamp sprawled clumsily. Dark pools of 



28 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORp 

stagnant water were spaced intermittently between gnarl- 
ed, twisted cedar trees which provided small islands of re- 
sistance to the clutching fingers of slime and water. Here 
and there a lone spruce or jack pine struggled towards the 
light, conspicuous by its young, tender bark and straight, 
true limbs. Over all filtered a greyish half-light, which 
made it difficult to perceive the sultry pools and the 
blackened trees. 

Through this lonely wilderness, a black bear wandered, 
squelching through the mud and dirt, and rudely interrupt- 
ing the brooding, heavy silence that clung like some damp 
fog. Perhaps driven by age to search for his food in 
easier hunting grounds, or seeking some respite from the 
noon-day sun, the bear travelled slowly through the trees, 
stopping occasionally to lick up some fat grub or to uproot 
a busy ants' nest. So he wandered, until quite suddenly 
he reached the edge of the quiet lake, and blinked for a 
few moments in the sudden glare. 

Meanwhile, the great bird of prey above had not been 
idle, but was at that very second staring eagerly at the 
faint outline of the giant pike, which, many feet below, 
was rising lazily to engulf a struggling fly. Without so 
much as a beat of its mighty wings, the eagle turned swift- 
ly and came hurtling down towards the surface of the 
sweltering lake. 

It so happened that the morose old bear had blundered, 
unsuspectingly, onto a convenient ledge just above the 
harmless fly. and having accustomed his eyes to the light, 
he, too. was waiting eagerly for the pike to rise to the sur- 
face. He tensed himself, ready to come down with a mighty 
paw, and so scoop his dinner onto the ledge. Yet before 
he could move, a frightening splash echoed over the lake, 
and midst a smother of spray the giant bird, unaware of a 
deadly foe, endeavoured to lift its burden from the water. 
Too late the eagle glimpsed the downward sweep of a 
black, furry paw, and too late, uttered a sharp shriek of 
dismay. Victor and vanquished were catapulted onto the 



TRINITY COLJ^EGE SCHOOL RECORD 29 

shore, and there quickly killed by deft blows from that 
formidable paw. 

The bear licked his chops; never had he had such luck, 
nor taken advantage of it so well. He was rather dubious 
about the eagle, but the fish looked particularly inviting 
and he raised a paw to turn it over. Fate, however, had 
raised her time-worn scissors twice already, and was not 
now to put them down. From across the lake there came 
a sharp crack, quickly followed by another, and with a 
momentary look of pain and helplessness, the bear rose up 
in anger and then fell dead beside his spoils. 

The hunter grinned happily to himself, and patted his 
rifle as he paddled swiftly across the quiet water towards 
the near shore. It was not for him to consider that the 
haunters of the silences had found a silence deeper than 
any they had ever known. 

— G.A.H.P. 



A SHORT STORY 



David Elliot, who was now seven years old, preferred 
to sit under the maple tree in his own back yard than play 
with the boys in the park. He had no friends outside his 
family, but he had learned to amuse himself in this small 
lot behind the house. 

At breakfast one morning his father asked him why 
he never played with the other boys. As David could give 
no answer to this, Mrs. Elliot pointed out that he was still 
very small. "No matter," Mr. Elliot replied, "he will have 
to make some friends some day; he can't sit under that 
tree all his life. David, are you afraid of the boys at the 
park?" The boy raised his blue eyes showing a worried 
look on his immature face. "No Daddy, I'm not afraid of 
them," he said with affected bravery. Mr. Elliot would 
have liked to have dropped the subject, but he felt he must 
carry out his duty as a father. "I think you should go 
over to the park this morning and ask the boys to play 



30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

with you." David made no reply, but a slight anxiety 
flitted across his face. 

After breakfast the young lad set off for the park. 
On arrival he saw a group of boys playing in a corner of 
the field. They were trying to walk along the top of a 
wire fence, but when they saw him coming they stopped 
their game to yell insulting remarks at the newcomer. 
"Here comes the baby. He has to stay in his own back 
yard all day. He only gets five cents a week and can't 
ride a two-wheel bike. I bet you can't even walk along 
the top of this fence without falling," one of them said. 
David agreed to the wager but in following it out he made 
a fool of himself. That night he said nothing to his 
parents, and just before he got into bed he knelt down 
and asked God to make him big and strong so that the 
boys would like him and want to be his friend. 

For the next week David tried every way to win their 
friendship, but each time he was rebuked for being such 
a baby. He had become the dummy for all their practical 
jokes. They would ring the door-bell of a nearby house 
and then run away, leaving David to take the con- 
sequences. One day they tied him to a lamp post and left 
him there until a passing gentleman cut him loose. 

He took his bullying well, but every night he stayed 
awake and wrestled with his problem. It would have been 
easy for him to drop the matter and go back to his old 
ways again. He realized, however, that his social failure 
was partly his own fault ; he had done nothing to earn their 
friendship. "If I could only do something great," he 
thought to himself one night, "something that they were 
afraid to do. I am sure it would help." After much 
thought a solution suddenly came to him. 

The next morning David did not go to the park, but 
headed straight for the church. On the way he met the 
other boys who were walking to the old playground. He 
told them that he was going to climb to the top of the 
church. "Don't be stupid." they said, "you will fall and 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 

break your neck for sure." "Oh no I won't," replied David, 
"you just watch." 

Solemnly he approached the wall of the church on 
which some tall, green vines were growing. The ascent 
was not difficult while he could place his foot on the stems 
of the vines, but as he gained in height he found himself 
scaling sheer stone. His fingers could barely grip the 
fissures and the soles on his shoes seemed to slip easily. 
He wondered if he were wise in doing this. However, he 
continued to climb up and up until he reached a drain-pipe. 
With all the strength of his thin arms he pulled his body 
onto the roof. He crawled carefully on all fours over the 
smooth slates, never looking back. Finally he reached the 
top and clung onto a thin black metal ornament; it was 
the steeple. 

For the first time, he looked down and saw his com- 
rades, like specks, on the sidewalk many feet below. The 
boys had never taken their eyes off his heroic ascent. David 
now knew that he had proved his worth for he heard a 
little cheer rise up from the group below. His knees were 
shaking and his body trembled, but for the first time in 
his life he was happy. 

This happiness faded a little when David remembered 
that he must get down. If he let go of the steeple he felt 
sure that he would slide down and fall over the edge of the 
roof, landing on the ground a twisted, broken bundle. It 
was not worth trying, so he clung to the steeple all the 
more tightly. Once again he realized how much he was 
trembling, and perspiration started to drip from his fore- 
head. 

An elderly lady had been looking out of her window 
and had seen the whole incident. She understood his pre- 
dicament and called the fire department to rescue him. 

David's problem was solved; and what was more im- 
portant, he had found the solution all by himself. Never 
again was he obliged to sit alone under the tree in his back 



32 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



yard. Every morning he would go and play with his 
friends in the park where he was now accepted as one of 
them. 

— W.H.P. 





R £CORD 



A SECONDARY REACTION 

Now, before I commence, just a word to the wise — 
(That is, those who have never poured acid on flies) 
If you are the type that absorbs chemistry, 
Then you're wasting your time if you listen to me. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 33 

If you make lots of notes and pay strict attention, 

Have never been threatened with unlimited detention, 

If you read and re-read and thoroughly digest, 

And always get ninety or so in a test; 

Then don't hearken to this, 'cause you won't understand 

The kick that you get when you make something grand 

Like an ungodly smell or a blue-green solution 

Or, most glorious of all, a huge evolution 

Of dark brownish gas that fills up the sink 

And, better by far, makes a wonderful stink: 

You really don't know the fun to be had 

If you let yourself go in the chemistry lab. 

It's all very well to sit up quite straight, 

Keep your hands in your lap and never be late; 

But with all those queer bottles the length of the shelf, 

It's more fun to experiment alone, by yourself: 

To watch a big fly by degrees decompose 

Well, it gives me a thrill that's hard to portray. 

Doubtless many of you have felt just that way; 

You can bet your last dollar that I wouldn't change, 

To completely attend would really seem strange. 

But, fun as it is, there's a moral that's sad, 

It's true, oh! how true, so give heed to this lad. 

If you don't know the diff. 'twixt cuprous and cupric 

Your chances are slim for your senior matric. 

— P.C.S. 




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TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



35 




EDITORIAL 

As "The Record" goes to press, the hockey team has 
already made a name for itself. A hockey championship 
has been brought to the School for the first time in its 
history. After sixteen gruelling games the team has 
eliminated all opponents to win the Eastern Ontario Cham- 
pionship. They are waiting now to play off for the Ontario 
title and our wishes are with them for further success. 

This is the first time in history that a T.C.S. hockey 
team has continued into Provincial play-downs, and the 
only time that a championship has been won. From the 
games played it appears that the success already achieved 
was due almost entirely to team-work, the six boys on the 
ice always playing as a unit and never letting up. 

The "Record" extends its congratulations to every 
man on the team. 

The hockey schedule was as follows: — 

League Games 

T.C.S. vs. Port Hope Won 13-4 

T.C.S. vs. Cobourg Won 8-4 

T.C.S. vs. Bowmanville Won 14-0 

T.C.S. vs. Port Hope Won 14-1 

T.C.S. vs. Cobourg Won 13-4 



36 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL. RECORD 

Group Play-offs 

T.C.S. vs. Port Hope Won 7-3 

First Round Play-offs 

T.C.S. vs. Peterborough Won 11-9 

T.C.S. vs. Peterborough Tied 8-8 

T.C.S. wins round 19-17 

Second Bound Play-offs 

T.C.S. vs. Whitby Won 4-3 

T.C.S. vs. Whitby Lost 5-4 

T.C.S. vs. Whitby Won 6-2 

T.C.S. wins round 14-10 

Eiastem Ontario Finals 

T.C.S. vs. Campbellford Won 8-7 

T.C.S. vs. Campbellford Won 8-4 

T.C.S. wins Championship 16-11 

Exhibition Crames 

T.C.S. vs. Lakefield Won 11-0 

T.C.S. vs. U.C.C Lost 7-5 

T.C.S. vs. Pickering Won 5-3 



SCORING ANALYSIS 

(The First Sixteen Games) 

Games Goals Assists Total Penalties 



McMurrich 16 

Sinclair 16 

Dobell ^ 16 

Gilbert ._ 16 

Howard 16 

Roenisch 16 









(In Min.) 


31 


28 


59 


2 


26 


25 


51 


10 


20 


28 


48 


4 


25 


18 


43 


6 


11 


15 


26 


24 


11 


14 


25 


4 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 37 

Huycke 16 3 16 19 8 

Hope 12 5 7 12 2 

Robarts 16 5 5 10 6 

Davidson 16 1 2 3 4 

Pearson 16 1 1 

Dawson 15 Goals Against, 59 

Fennell 1 Goals Against, 4 

Total goals for: 138. Total goals against: 63. 

Played, 16: Won, 13; Tied 1; Lost, 2. 



SCHOOL vs. BOWMANVILLE 
At Port Hope, January 30: Won 14-0 

In a rather one-sided, raggedly played game the School 
chalked up their third consecutive win, defeating a much 
weaker Bowmanville squad, 14-0. The game was slow and, 
although T.C.S. dominated the play throughout, only in the 
early part of the second period did they show the excellent 
brand of hockey of which they are capable. 

Right from the opening whistle the School hemmed in 
a bewildered Bowmanville team. McMurrich opened the 
scoring early in the period when he banged Huycke's pass 
behind the opposing goalie. T.C.S. continued to press, com- 
pletely out-skating and out-playing their rivals yet scoring 
only once more during the period, Sinclair being the goal- 
getter on a long, low shot from the blue-line. This put the 
School on top of a 2-0 count at the end of the period. 

Both teams picked up as the second period started and 
the game became much faster. Gilbert and Howard gain- 
ed two more goals for T.C.S. early in the period, Gilbert 
on a scramble in front of the Bowmanville goal and Howard 
on a long, hard shot. Several times Bowmanville attempted 
to score, but they were stopped every time by the T.C.S. 
defence. The School kept up the pressure with McMur- 
rich and Dobell scoring within four seconds of each other. 
Gilbert scored again with twenty-eight seconds to go. 



38 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

giving the School a substantial 7-0 lead as the period 
ended. 

In the final frame T.C.S. banged home seven more 
goals. The Bowmanville team, which had apparently shot 
its bolt in the second period, seemed powerless to stop the 
School. McMurrich, with two goals, led the attack; Dobell, 
Roenisch, Howard, Robarts and Sinclair were the other 
School marksmen. 

The three stars of the game were Howard, Dobell and 
McMurrich. 

Bowmanville — Goal, Hooper; defence, Fighe, Strike; centre, 
Cowle; wings, Sturroch, Stevens. Alternates: Rundell, Woodward, 
Dadson, Hooper, Cornish, Hood. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, McMurrich, Sinclair. Alternates: Roenisch, Gilbert, Robarts, 
Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE 
At Port Hope, February 2: Won 14-1 

In their second encounter with Port Hope, the School 
came out on top of a 14-1 score. It was their fourth straight 
win in which games the team scored forty-nine goals to 
nine against it. 

The game was very fast in the first two periods, al- 
though it slowed down in the final frame. Despite the 
score, the Port Hope forwards were a continual threat, 
Dawson many times saving the day on spectacular stops. 
The School picked up eight goals in the first period, out- 
scored their opponents 5-1 in the second and were content 
with one tally in the third period. 

Roenisch opened the scoring for T.C.S. at 3.09 on a 
hard shot on which Naylor, in the Port Hope goal, had no 
chance. Less than half a minute later Gilbert scored on a 
quick play from Roenisch. The Port Hope defence seemed 
powerless to stop the attacking School forwards who had 
most of the play during the period. McMurrich scored 
two within two minutes, and Sinclair scored two fifty-two 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 39 

seconds apart. Several times the Port Hope forwards 
attacked but the School defence stopped them every time. 
Howard scored for T.C.S. on a long shot almost from 
centre and Gilbert scored before the period ended to give 
the School an 8-0 lead. 

The second period was very fast and a bit rough, with 
Fort Hope aggressive at first, but the School again domina- 
ting the play during the latter part. Gilbert scored his 
third goal a minute after the period began on a pass from 
Robarts. Hunt got Port Hope's lone tally on a mix-up 
around the School net. Some time later Sinclair banged 
home Huycke's rebound, and McMurrich, Roenisch and 
Gilbert were the other T.C.S. goal-getters of the period. 

Sinclair scored the only goal of the third period at the 
two minute mark on a lovely solo play. The remainder of 
the period was fairly even though a bit ragged toward the 
end. The three stars were Gilbert, Sinclair and Robarts. 

Port Hope — Goal, Naylor; defence, Currelly, Lewis; centre, 
Hunt; wings, Sidey, S. Dotzko. Alternates: Burley, B. Dotzko, 
Ashby, Churchley, Pollard, Mark, Abrams. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Howard, Huycke; centre, Do- 
bell; wings, McMurrich, Sinclair. Alternates: Gilbert, Robarts, 
Roenisch, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. COBOURG 
At Port Hope, February 6: Won 12-S 

The School went into their fifth straight victory by 
beating Cobourg in an undisputed 12-3 win. 

At the beginning of the first period, play was fairly 
even, Cobourg many times beating the defence, but un- 
able to get one passed Dawson. The score was finally 
opened at 16:17 by Roenisch from Gilbert. A minute later 
Gilbert slapped the puck through the Cobourg defence and 
Roenisch knocked it into the net for his second goal. 

The second period opened with a tripping penalty for 
Flesch. The School took advantage of the extra man and 
scored two more goals. The first was a fast, well placed 



40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

shot by Robarts and the second came from the face-off 
when Gilbert stick-handled through the defence and passed 
to Roenisch, who scored his third goal of the game. It was 
not long before this fast-clicking forward line again went 
into action to give T.C.S. its fifth goal in a lovely executed 
play by Gilbert from Robarts. Cobourg tried to retaliate 
but their poor shooting failed to worry Dawson in the 
T.C.S, nets. Dobell banged in Howard's rebound and this 
was soon followed by another from McMurrich to Sinclair. 
At the end of the period, Cobourg put on a spurt and from 
a scramble scored their first goal. 

Cobourg opened the last period by scoring two goals 
After some good saves by Dawson, Goody managed to get 
one into the net; five minutes later Elliot poked one into 
the comer. Then our forwards retaliated, and McMurrich 
scored from a break-away. Not ten seconds later, Mc- 
Murrich scored again from the face-off. During the last 
ten minutes of the game, Cobourg had many break-aways 
but were unable to fool Dawson who calmly knocked the 
puck aside. The School was not satisfied with their nine 
goal lead so they banged home three goals in the last four 
minutes of play. McMurrich scored the first from Sin- 
clair, followed by a long shot of Dobell's which sneaked 
into the comer. With one minute left, the combination of 
Sinclair and McMurrich came through with the twelfth 
goal, Sinclair being the marksman. 

Dawson's cool, calm and collected manner in knocking 
the Cobourg shots aside made him the outstanding figure 
on the ice. Roenisch's three goals and tireless back-check- 
ing made him another star. Gilbert also played a good 
game for T.C.S. by scoring one goal and four assists. The 
outstanding player for Cobourg was Bulger. 

Cotxmrg — Goal, Hoselton; defence, Shorey, McMillan; wings, 
Goody, Elliot. Alternates: Smith, Jamieson, Bulger, Hogan, Flesch, 
Munroe. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Howard, Huycke; centre, Do- 
bell; wings, McMurrich, Sinclair. Alternates: Robarts, Gilbert, 
Roenisch, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 




MIDDLESIDE HOCKEY TEAM, 1945 
Back Row: — The Headmaster, G. N. McD. Currie, G. B. Taylor, I. B. Campbell, 

G. N. Fisher, Mr. Key. 
Front Row:—W. A. Curtis, K. C. Lambert, T. W. Lawson, P. M. Bird (Capt.), 

D. W. Hawke, J. W. Dobson, B. A. Macdonald, F. A. H. Greenwood. 
Absetif.—C. W. Long. * 




LITTLESIDE HOCKEY TEAM, 1945 
Buck Ron: — The Headmaster, I. F. H. Rogers, W. J. Brewer, J. B. French, 

Mr. Gwynne-Timothy. 
Front Row:~H. A. Hyde, R. S. Jarvis, E. M. Bronfman, A. C. B. Wells (Capt.), 

H. P. Goodbody, W. K. Newcomb, W. M. Dobell, R. H. Gaunt. 




LITTLl -, )IO'_hL1- lEAM, 1945 

Back Ron:— The Headmaster, D. E. D. Gill, M. T. H. Brodeur. L. K. Black, G. F. Brooks, 

Mr. Gv^'vnne-Timothy. 
Front Ron-. — J. D. de Pencier, A. Kmgman, M. E. McLennan, D. B. McPherson (Capt.), 

D. V. Deverali, H. A. Gumming. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 4.1 

SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 
At Port Hope, February 9: Won 11-0 

In the first exhibition game of the season, T.C.S. 
carried their unbeaten streak to six games, defeating Lake- 
field 11-0. Despite the score, the game was fast and even, 
Dawson in the T.C.S. nets spoiling many fine Grove 
chances. 

The play started close, with neither team able to 
penetrate decisively into the other's end; Dobell finally 
scored at 7:05 minutes on a fast breaking play from Sin- 
clair and Howard. The School took advantage of a Lake- 
field penalty to drive into Grove territory and carried the 
majority of play for the rest of the period. McMurrich 
scored the second goal on a close in play from Dobell and 
Sinclair. Gilbert made it 3-0 when he beat Reeve on a 
break-away fifteen seconds before the period ended. 

The second period opened slowly, both teams pressing 
hard but unable to score due to the excellent goal tending 
of Dawson and Reeve. McMurrich scored the lone second 
period goal at 18:57 minutes when he slapped in a rebound 
from Howard and Dobell while MacKenzie of Lakefield was 
serving a penalty. 

Dobell made it 5-0 for the School on a nice play from 
McMurrich after two minutes of the third period. Although 
the play remained hard and fast, a fighting T.C.S. team 
proved too much for the Grove, and once again the Dobell- 
McMurrich combination tallied. Lakefield fought back 
hard, but agam Dobell slapped it in on a nice play from 
McMurrich and Sinclair to make the score 7-0 for the 
School. Robarts made it 8-0 when he slipped Pearson's 
rebound past Reeve. Dobell again teamed up with Howard 
to score his fifth goal, and three seconds later passed it 
from the face-off to Sinclair, who scored on a low, hard 
shot. McMurrich tallied the final goal on a clever play 
from Huycke. 

Dawson's fine saves made him the outstanding figure 
on the ice and he fully deserved his shut-out. Wilkes and 



42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Harris, with their drive and tricky stick-handling, were 
best for Lakefield. Dobell, with five goals and three assists, 
was the high-scoring School forward. 

Lakefield— Goal, Reeve; defence, Shanley, Roy; centre, Harris; 
wings, MacKenzie, Lyle. Alternates: Wilkes, Langmuir, Ker, Smart, 
Nurse, Alston. 

T.C.S Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 

wings, Sinclair, McMurrich. Alternates: Gilbert, Hope, Roenisch, 
Robarts, Pearson, Davidson. 



SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE 
At Port Hope, February- 13: Won 7-3 

In the first of a two game, goals-to-count series with 
the Port Hope Ontarios for the O.M.H.A. Juvenile District 
Championships, T.C.S. gained a four goal lead, defeating 
Port Hope. 7-3. The game was fairly fast throughout, 
though at times the very close checking slowed it down. It 
was closer than the score indicates with the Port Hope 
forwards pressing the T.C.S. defence, yet not showing as 
much polish around the net as the School players did. 
T.C.S. got off to a slow start and it was not until midway 
through the final period that they pulled out in front. 

The only goal of the first period was scored by Hope 
from a face-off in the Port Hope zone a minute after the 
game began. The remainder of the period was fast and 
close with both goal-keepers handling many shots fault- 
lessly. Although at the first of the period T.C.S. had most 
of the play. Port Hope were forcing it near the end. 

Howard put the School two up early in the second 
period on a beautifully executed solo rush from centre, on 
which Naylor in the Port Hope nets had no chance. Sin- 
clair made it 3-0 on a well-timed play, banging home 
Howard's rebound. Marks scored the first Port Hope 
counter when he combined with Billy Dotzko toward the 
end of the period. 

The furious pace continued in the third period, and. 
after only half a minute had elapsed. Hunt scored for Port 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 43 

Hope during a scramble in front of the goal-mouth. Port 
Hope continued to press, but after five minutes of play 
Correlly drew a penalty and Sinclair scored on a play with 
McMurrich and Dobell. Taking a pass from Gilbert, 
Roenisch got the fifth School score on a long, hard shot. 
Marks scored again for Port Hope soon after to keep them 
in a threatening position. During a Port Hope power- 
attack, McMurrich got a break-away and went in on the 
goal alone to score. Howard clinched the game on another 
spectacular end-to-end rush, scoring unassisted. In the 
closing minutes of the game Dobell was awarded a penalty 
shot but it was nicely blocked by Naylor and the final 
score remained 7-3. 

Howard was the most effective man on the ice. He 
played a beautiful rushing game and also a good defensive 
one. Despite the score, Naylor was the best for the losers, 
many times repulsing the heavy School attack. Roenisch 
deserved the third star for the scrappy, close-checking 
game he played. 

Port Hope — Goal, Naylor; defence, Correlly, S. Dotzko; centre. 
Hunt; wings, Lewis, Abrams. Alternates: Pollard, B. Dotzko, Marks, 
Ashby, Churchly. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Howard, Huycke; centre, Dobell; 
wings, McMurrich, Sinclair. Alternates: Gilbert, Roenisch, Hope, 
Robarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Oshawa, February 17: Lost 7-5. 

T.C.S. suffered their first loss in eight starts, when 
Upper Canada defeated them 7-5 at Oshawa. The School 
seemed to be hampered by the larger ice surface in the 
first two periods, missing many chances, but in the final 
frame broke loose and tied the score up, only to be beaten 
in the last two minutes. 

The first period opened quickly, Upper Canada press- 
ing hard and forcmg the play until McDougall opened the 
scoring after 2:13 minutes. McMurrich evened it up, how- 



44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

ever, when he and Sinclair broke loose from their own 
blue-line. Dobell put the School ahead two minutes later, 
beating Harvie with a low, hard shot, on a pass from Mc- 
Murrich. The play remained even for a while, but Upper 
Canada soon regained the edge and kept it for the re- 
mainder of the period. Spence evened the score again, 
when he poked Lloyd's pass past Dawson, and although 
Upper Canada kept it in the School end, they were unable 
to beat Dawson until Denton scored on a break-away one 
minute before the end of the period. 

Play in the second period was even, both teams skating 
hard but missing a lot of chances around the net. The 
School had a slight edge at first, but Upper Canada was 
pressing hard at the end. Lloyd scored for U.C.C. after 
seven minutes of play, and although T.C.S. pressed hard, 
they could not get it past Harvie. Lloyd was again the 
Upper Canada marksman, when he scored from a scramble 
in front of the net to make it 5-2. The remainder of the 
period saw Upper Canada breaking fast from their own 
end, but unable to get past Huycke and Howard on de- 
fence. 

McMurrich opened the scoring two minutes after the 
start of the third period on a play from Sinclair, while 
Spence of U.C.C. was serving a penalty for body-checking, 
Davidson made it 5-4 when he took Gilbert's pass at the 
blue-line and scored. The School definitely had the edge 
in play with Dawson stopping several Upper Canada breaks 
and the defence clearing well for the forwards. Time and 
again, however, the alert Upper Canada defence proved 
too much for the School's break-aways. Robarts tied the 
score half-way through the period on a fast-breaking play 
from Gilbert. Play remained even until Gossage scored 
with two minutes to go. Spence clinched the game for 
U.C.C. when he banged home his second goal less than a 
minute later to make the final score 7-5 for Upper Canada. 

The skating and stick-handling of Davidson and 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 45 

Spence marked them as the two outstanding players on 
the ice, while Gilbert was the best for the School. 

U.O.C. — Goal, Harvie; defence, McDougall, Riddell; centre, 
Davidson; wings, Denton, Gossage. Alternates: Spence, Lloyd, 
Leuty, Prouse. 

T.C.S.^ — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurrich. Alternates: Gilbert, Hope, Roenisch, 
Robarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH 
At Lakefield, February 19: Won 11-9 

In a close game with Peterborough, the School eked 
out an 11-9 victory to take a two point lead in the home- 
and-home play-off series. Not until the final period did 
the School move into a four goal lead, which Peterborough 
whittled down to two before the end of the game. 

Mortimer opened the game with a bang, scoring from 
the opening face-off on a lovely solo effort. Gilbert, how- 
ever, soon evened it up when he slapped in Roenisch's re- 
bound. Play see-sawed back and forth, neither team able 
to hold the edge. Sinclair put the School ahead when he 
teamed up with Huycke and McMurrich to score from in 
close, but Stock evened it up again on a nice shot from the 
blue-line. Once again Sinclair put the School up when he 
banged the puck in from a scramble, but Peterborough 
came right back, Mortimer breaking free from centre. 
Sinclair scored his third goal of the period on a nice play 
from Dobell and McMurrich, but Wilshaw made it 4-4 
when he scored from the comef on an excellent three-man 
break. 

The second period saw a continuation of the play of 
the first, both teams showing nice combination, but neither 
able to hold the edge. Gilbert put the School up on a lovely 
play from Roenisch and Hope, but again the score was 
evened when Stock's hard shot beat Dawson. Sinclair then 
scored two quick goals, teaming with McMurrich and Do- 
bell respectively, to give T.C.S. the first two-goal lead of 



46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

the game. Thompson, however, narrowed it down to one 
when he combined with Harris on a lovely close-in play. 
Both teams showed some lovely rushing, Thompson tally- 
ing once more, a few seconds before the period's end, to 
tie the score again, 7-7. 

The School pressed hard from the start of the final 
period, and managed to keep the puck in Peterborough 
territory for most of the game. Roenisch opened the 
scoring on a hard shot, Gilbert and Hope assisting. Gil- 
bert added another when he rapped it in from a scramble, 
and then teamed up with Hope on the nicest play of the 
game to put the School three up. Howard took advantage 
of a Peterborough penalty to score on a hard shot from 
the blue-line five minutes before the end of the game. 
Peterborough fought back, however, and goals by Burley 
and Stock, while Gilbert and Mortimer were off for high- 
sticking, made the final count 11-9. The line of Hope, 
Gilbert and Roenisch was largely responsible for the 
School's superiority in the final period. 

Mortimer's hard and clever skating made him the out- 
standing figure on the ice, while Dobell and Hope were 
best for the School. 

Peterborough — Goal, Atchison; defence, Padgett, Daley; centre, 
Mortimer; wings, Thompson, Harris. Alternates: Burley, Russell, 
WiLshaw, Stock. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Howard, Huycke; centre, Dobell; 
wings, McMurrlch, Sinclair. Alternates: Hope, Gilbert, Roenisch, 
R.obarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH 
At Port Hope, February 21: Tle<l 8-8. 
The School advanced one step further in the O.M.H.A. 
Juvenile play-downs by tying Peterborough in their second 
game 8-8. Despite the dead-lock, T.C.S. won the group by 
previously winning the first. 11-9. The game was very 
fast with the forwards on both teams playing exceptionally 
well, making many three-man, end-to-end rushes. Both 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 47 

teams took advantage of the breaks — seven of the goals 
being scored with one team short-handed. 

During a thrilling, high-scoring first period both teams 
played fast, aggressive hockey; the score was tied 4-4 
when the period ended. Mortimer scored for Peterborough 
in the first minute of plaj^ during a scramble in front of 
the goal-mouth. McMurrich tied it up at 4:01, but Peter- 
borough jumped into a two-goal lead on scores by Harris 
and Thompson. Howard and Dobell evened up the count 
again, scoring within ten seconds of one another. Again 
Peterborough took the lead, Mortimer scoring for the 
second time, and again the School tied it up, Hope tallying 
with three seconds left. 

The School went ahead by one goal in the second 
period, outscoring Peterborough 3-2. The furious pace 
continued and the game became rather rough. Howard 
scored for the School on a long shot, but Peterborough re- 
gained the lead on goals by Wilshaw and Harris. Twenty 
seconds later Roenisch tied it up again. Howard got his 
second goal before the period ended to make the score 7-6. 

Thompson and Mortimer for Peterborough and Gil- 
bert for T.C.S. were the third period marksmen. All the 
goals were scored before the seven minute mark, and for 
the remainder of the game Peterborough tried in vain to 
crack the School defence. 

Mortimer was the best man on the ice for Peter- 
borough while Dobell and Gilbert starred for the School. 

Peterborough — Goal, Atcliison; defence, Padgett, Daley; centre, 
Mortimer; wings, Thompson, Harris. Alternates: Bureey, Ruacel, 
Wilshaw, Stock. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, DobeU; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurrich. Alternates: Roenisch, Gilbert, Hope, 
Robarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. PICKERING COLLEGE 
At Toronto, February 23: Won 5-3. 

The School turned up winner again in an exhibition 



48 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

game with Pickering College with the 5-3 score a strong 
indication of the closeness of play. 

The hockey was sluggish at first, but soon Dobell 
opened the scoring in a net scramble, taking a pass from 
Sinclair and banging it in. Shortly after, this pair clicked 
again, making it 2-0 for the School, Dobell on a long pass 
from Sinclair. Pickering threatened several times, but 
Dawson professionally kept an empty T.C.S. net. 

The teams changed ends and started the second period 
with no rest. Pickering opened the scoring with Kemp's 
neat goal from Kouduros. Several threats from both teams 
followed, and long rushes caused some excitement, but 
both teams had strong goalies and defencemen, and both 
were held to no further score. From here Pickering drove 
hard, controlling the play for a good deal of the period, 
yet Dawson again came to the fore and T.C.S. maintained 
a one goal lead. 

The third period opened speedily, with T.C.S. frequent- 
ly threatening to score. Both teams fought madly for the 
puck, and the game was fast and indecisive. Finally, to- 
wards the end of the period, Gilbert shot Howard's pass, 
and made it 3-1. Seventeen seconds later Gilbert scored 
again, this time from Roenisch. The play was feverish, 
yet seemed to be all T.C.S., for once again the combination 
of Dobell and Sinclair was more than a match for Tetrault. 
and the score mounted to 5-1 in the School's favour. In 
the last minutes of the game, however. Beach raked up an 
unassisted one for Pickering, and almost immediately after- 
wards Grant scored from Kecup. Kecup looked best for 
Pickering, while Dobell and Howard stood out for the 
School. 

Pickering — Goal, Tetrault; defence, Kouduros, Beach; centre, 
Kecup; wings, Grant, Cruickshank. Alternates: Rogers, Bird, J. 
Marshall, B. Marshall, Foster, Bowlby, Cansen, Rowe. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Daw.son; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, McMurrich, Sinclair. Alternates: Gilbert, Roenisch, Hoi>e. 
Robart.s, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 49 

SCHOOL vs. VV^ITBY 

At Whitby, February 28: Won 4-3. 

In their first play-off game with Whitby, last year's 
O.M.H.A. Juvenile Champions, the School gained a one- 
goal margin, defeating them 4-3 in a tight, hard-fought 
game. Three goals were scored in the first two minutes 
of play but, after this opening flurry, the game settled 
do'v\Ti to close-checking and fast play with the teams very 
evenly matched. 

The School jumped mto an early lead in the first 
period when McMurrich rapped two quick goals behind the 
dazed Whitby goalie. Whitby fought back and a minute 
later Kaiser picked up a loose puck in front of the T.C.S. 
goal and scored. The remainder of the period saw some 
good hockey in which both teams played aggressively. 
Kaiser finally scored the equalizer on a nice passing play 
with Fleet. 

The teams battled without score for almost the entire 
second period. The School had the edge on the play and 
missed several chances to tally. Whitby, however, played 
a steady game on defence and continually threatened; both 
goalies kicked out many hard shots during the period, 
Dawson being especially brilliant on Whitby break-aways. 
McMurrich scored his third goal, and put the School one 
up, on a play with Howard and Sinclair late in the period. 

Hope made it 4-2 for the School early in the third 
period, back-handing Gilbert's pass into the open net. 
Whitby fought back and Lowe put them in the fight again 
about two minutes later on a lovely shot. The remainder 
of the period saw many end-to-end rushes, both teams 
fighting hard yet neither being able to score. 

Dawson, in goal for the School, played a wonderful 
game, many times saving almost certain goals. Lowe was 
best for Whitby, playing a rugged game on defence. Sin- 
clair for T.C.S. also played well. 



50 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Whitby — Gk>al, McEwen; defence, Lowe, MacDonald; centre. 
Gates; wings, Pascoe, Yuill. Alternates: Hooker, Flett, Peter 
Kaiser, McClosky, Moore, Paul Kaiser. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurricli. Alternates: Roenisch, Hope, Gilbert, 
Robarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. WHITBY 
At Port Hope, March 2: Lost 5-4. 

In an exciting game despite the soft ice, Whitby 
Juveniles evened the total goal count with T.C.S. by beat- 
ing them 5-4. A ten-minute overtime produced no scoring 
by either team. 

The School pressed hard from the opening face-off, 
but were unable to get it past McEwen in the Whitby nets. 
Whitby cleared, and the situation reversed itself, with 
T.C.S. on the defensive. Dawson's saves kept the score- 
sheets clean, until Gates knocked it in on a scramble. The 
School seemed rather tied up, and Moore soon made it 2-0 
on a hard shot from the blue-line. Both teams improved 
after this and passing, even on the poor ice, was good. 
T.C.S. again kept play in the Whitby end but were unable 
to score. 

Dobell got the School's first goal early in the second 
period on a fast breaking play from Huycke and Sinclair 
while Gates of Whitby was serving a penalty. T.C.S. 
carried most of the play, while Dawson and the fine work 
of the defence kept Whitby from scoring until the end of 
the period. Gilbert tied the score on a nice shot from 
Roenisch, and then Sinclair put the School one up when 
Dobell's pass found him free in front of the net. Pascoe, 
however, made it 3-3 just before the end of the period 
beating Dawson on a close-in shot. 

Whitby opened the third period with two goals by 
Pascoe and Hooker while Howard and Lowe were off for 
roughing. Whitby kept play in the T.C.S. end until Kaiser's 
penalty gave the School a chance to press, but they were 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 

unable to score. Play quickened, both teams realizing the 
need for victory, but neither team scored until near the 
end, when Gilbert broke away from centre ice and beat 
McEwen from close in. 

In the ten-minute overtime period, neither team was 
able to score. Both played hard although the condition of 
the ice prevented any co-ordinated attacks. The School 
was awarded a penalty shot, but Gilbert's attempt went 
wide of the net. Robart's penalty gave Whitby a chance 
to attack, but they were unable to get it past Dawson, and 
the final whistle went with the score still 5-4 for Whitby. 

Gates of Whitby seemed to be the best of either team, 
while Pascoe, with two goals, was their high scorer. Daw- 
son was the star for the School, making many fine saves 
in the nets. 

Whitby — Goal, McEwen; defence, Lowe, MacDonald; centre, 
Gates; wings, Pascoe, Yuill. Alternates: MacCarl, Hooker, Flett, 
Kaiser, McCloskey, Moore. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurrich. Alternates: Gilbert, Hope, Roeniach, 
Robarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs, WHITBY 
At Oshawa, March 5: Won 6-2. 

In their third play-off game with Whitby, the School 
eliminated last year's champions, defeating them 6-2. It 
was a fast, hard-played game and despite the score, Whit- 
by was very aggressive and kept T.C.S. on the defensive 
for a good deal of the first and third periods. Whitby 
scored the only goal of the first period but a hard-check- 
ing School team fought back in the second frame and 
rapped home four goals. Whitby again took the initiative 
in the final period but excellent defensive work by T.C.S. 
held them to one goal. In the final minutes of the game 
the School scored twice more to clinch the series. 

T.C.S. started fast and for the first five minutes 
hemmed in the Whitby team, but good work by McEwen 



52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

in goal kept them from scoring. Gradually Whitby came 
to light and later in the period the teams were even, both 
playing excellent hockey. The lone goal of the period was 
scored by Yuill while the School was short-handed. He 
received a pass from Gates and beat Dawson from close in. 

A rejuvenated T.C.S. team took the ice in the second 
period, out-skating, out-playing and out-checking Whitby 
for the entire period. Huycke quickly tied the score when 
his long shot deflected off a player into the net. Soon 
after, T.C.S. took the lead when Gilbert scored on a pass 
from Huycke. The School continued to press and Roenisch 
tallied during a scramble around the goal-mouth. The 
fourth counter was scored by Dobell, nine seconds before 
the end of the period, with the School short-handed. He 
raced in fast on a break-away, scoring on a low, hard shot 
to the corner. 

Whitby put T.C.S. on the defensive for the greater 
part of the third period as they fought hard to cut down 
the School lead. Pascoe put them back in a threatening 
position when he stick-handled through the defence to 
score unassisted, but for the remainder of the period the 
T.C.S. defence held out, and Whitby fought in vain. In the 
final two minutes, with Whitby short-handed, Gilbert 
scored unassisted and Sinclair scored on a pass from 
Howard to make the final score 6-2. 

Gilbert, with two goals, was the spark-plug of the 
School forwards while Huycke starred on defence. Pascoe 
was the most effective for Whitby. 

Whitby — Goal, McEwen; defence, Lowe, MacDonald; centre, 
Gates; wings, Pascoe, Yuill. Alternates: Hooker, Flett, Peter Kaiser, 
McClosky, Moore, Paul Kaiser. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurrich. Alternates: Roenisch, Hope, Gilbert, 
Robarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 

SCHOOL vs. CAMPBELLFORD 
At Campbellford, March 7: Won 8-7. 

The School edged out the Campbellford Juveniles at 
Campbellford 8-7 in the first of two games to decide the 
Eastern Ontario Championship. This was played on the 
best ice of the season, and from start to finish was any- 
body's game. Shillingham opened the scoring at the five 
second mark with a perfect, high shot from outside the 
blue-line. Shortly afterwards Howard, on a smooth rush 
from his own blue-line, evened it up. A goal by Gilbert 
from Hope set the score at 2-1. The remainder of the 
period was notable for two brilliant saves by Dawson on 
clean break-aways, more rushes by Howard, and the fast 
moving play. 

Campbellford, pressing hard early in the second period, 
set up Pettigrew and Free to net one each, despite the 
good goal-tending by Dawson. The play then see-sawed 
back and forth for a time, speeding up near the end of the 
frame when Gilbert scored from Hope and Roenisch, and 
Free notched one for Campbellford. 

Trembly's goal in the first minute of the third period, 
and Sinclair's from McMurrich shortly afterwards, served 
to liven up the game. Two goals by Gilbert, one each by 
Hope, Pettigrew and McMurrich, all in quick succession, 
put both the crowd and the team in a good fighting mood, 
and culminated in the only penalty of the evening when 
West went off for boarding. Campbellford rallied in the 
last minute of the game, Fife managing to net one while 
West was still serving his penalty. The last period was 
notable for the lovely unassisted rush and goal by Hope, 
and by the consistently good goal- tending by Dawson. The 
game ended in an 8-7 victory for the School. Dawson and 
Huycke were consistently best for T.C.S., Fife for Camp- 
bellford. 

Campbellford — Goal, Maxwell; defence, O'Rouke, Fife; centre, 
Shillingtiam; wings, Pettigrew, Free. Alternates: Trembly, Hay, 
Oliver, West, Ross. 



54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, McMuiTich, Sinclair. Alternates: Gilbert, Roenisch, Hope, 
Robarts, Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. CAMPBELLFORD 

At Port Hope, March 9: Won 8-4. 

The School won the Eastern Ontario Juvenile "B" 
Hockey Championship when they defeated Campbellford 
8-4, thereby winning the round 16-11. The game was well 
played and keenly contested by both teams although poor 
ice slowed up the pace. The School went ahead 4-1 in the 
first period; both teams scored once in the second period; 
and T.C.S. outscored their opponents 3-2 in the final frame. 

Campbellford opened the scoring when Fife golfed a 
rolling puck into the School net. Sinclair tied it up on a 
low, hard shot to the corner. Four minutes later he scored 
again on an almost identical shot. The third one for T.C.S. 
came on a break-away when Gilbert faked the goalie out 
of position and passed to Roenisch who scored on the open 
net. McMurrich bagged another for the School during a 
T.C.S. ganging attack when Campbellford was short-hand- 
ed. The period was very fast and despite the score Camp- 
bellford held a good part of the play, lacking polish around 
the School net. 

The game slowed down in the second period due to the 
ice, and neither team could get their plays to click. Free 
scored on a good play with Trembly and Shillingham, but 
soon after McMurrich tallied on a deflected shot to make 
the score 5-2. 

Sinclair scored his third goal early in the third period 
and for the next ten minutes the play see-sawed back and 
forth with neither team able to score. Finally, Hope scored 
on a back-handed shot but soon after Fife again countered. 
In the final minutes of play both teams scored again, Shil- 
lingham for Campbellford and McMurrich for T.C.S. Sin- 
clair and Dobell for the School and Fife for Campbellford 
were the best on the ice. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 

Oampbellford — Goal, Maxwell; defence, O'Rouke, Fife; centre, 
Free; wings, Trembly, Shillingham. Alternates: West, Pettigrew, 
Hay, Mechetruk, Rosa. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurricli. Alternates: Roenisch, Robarts, Gilbert, 
Hope. Davidson, Pearson, Fennell. 



MASTERS vs. SENIORS 



A much improved team of Trinity College School 
Masters avenged their defeat of last year by downing the 
Senior boys 9-8 in a hard-fought and exhausting (for the 
Masters) game. Showing a classy passing attack on the 
forward line and a stalwart defence, the Masters had little 
trouble in emerging victorious. 

Before the Masters got used to the ice, goals by 
Bovaird, Mclntyre and French had put the Seniors in the 
lead 3-1, Mr. Hodgetts scoring for the Masters on a solo 
rush for which he had been practising all season. Gradually 
the Masters became accustomed to their novel environment 
and. spurred on by the valiant efforts of the First Team 
coach, they whipped ( ?) two shots past Wade, Mr. Gwynne- 
Timothy getting the equalizer. The period was ended here 
as the Masters obviously required a long respite. 

In the second period one team appeared to be using 
their hockey sticks as crutches. We believe that the many 
body checks handed out by the Common Room men were 
merely efforts to rest their tiring bodies on the nearest 
objects. The Seniors seemed confused by these spectacular 
but illegal checks and the Masters pierced the defence of 
Irwin and Cox i without difficulty. Three tallies were made 
by Messieurs Key and Gwynne-Timothy. French i and 
Butterfield i were the only ones to crack the net-minding 
skOl of Mr. Gregoris, leaving the Masters ahead 5-2 at the 
end of the second period. 

Early in the last period the Masters got their final 
point when Mr. Hodgetts doubled his hat trick. The pace 
was telling on the older team now, and it was whispered 



56 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



that Mr. Gwynne-Timothy got his penalty because he 
wanted a rest. This was poor strategy because Butterfield 
was able to counter three more times despite the valiant 
defensive work of Mr. Bagley. The final whistle blew with 
the Seniors pressing hard to tie it up. Final score was 9-8. 
It is again rumoured that the Headmaster is planning to 
hang up his skates. 





THE BASKETBALL TEAM, 1945 
Back Ron: — The Headmaster, D. S. Hare, G. O. Taylor, Mr. Hodgetts, S. C. Edmonds, 

T. McC. Wade, Mr. Kerr. 
Front Ron:— J. R. deC. Warner. W. S. Carhartt, W. J. A. Toole, H. French (Cape), 

C. G. H. Drew, J. R. Ligertwood. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 57 

MIDDLESIDE 

SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At U.C.C, February 3: Lost 5-0. 

U.C.C. gained the upper hand from the start of the 
first period and the School seemed slow to warm up. More- 
lock scored the first goal for the College mid-way through 
the first period, and McLeod made it two when he slipped 
one past Fennell in the T.C.S. goal. The School fought 
back hard but lacked finish around the net. Fennell made 
several good saves before the period ended. 

Ball scored the first goal of the second period, and 
then the School seemed to improve their game. Bird and 
Macdonald led many threatening rushes, but the U.C.C. 
defence rose to the occasion. Fields made it 4-0 for U.C.C. 
before the period ended. 

The third period saw much closer play and it was not 
until the closing minutes that Field scored his second goal. 
The score ended 5-0. 

U.C.C. — Murphy, Orr, McLeod, Pringle, Moreback, Field, Hewitt, 
Ball, Chi^holm. 

T.C.S. — Bird, Macdonald, Lawson, Currie, Campbell i, Taylor ii, 
Lambert, Dobson, Long, Fisher, Fennell. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 
At Lakefield, February 7: Won 2-1. 

As in the Upper Canada game, T.C.S. seemed to take 
a while to get started, and about five minutes after the be- 
ginning of the first period Janes scored for the Grove on 
a shot which bounced off the skate of a T.C.S. player. Half- 
way through the period, however, the School pressed, and 
Dobson got some nice shots away from the blue-line. 

Two minutes after the beginning of the second period 
Macdonald scored a nice goal, and from then on T.C.S. had 
the edge, although many chances in front of the goal were 
missed. 



58 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Just after the beginning of the last period. Bird 
scored for the School on a pass from Lawson, and although 
Lakefield made several rushes the puck was in their end 
for most of the play. There were penalties for both sides 
as the Grove tried desperately to score and the School tried 
to keep the lead. Our inability to get good shots away was 
apparent towards the end of the game, and the score re- 
mained at 2-1. 

Lakefield — ^Widdifield, Gordon, Duff, Shaw, Sinclair, Hutchings, 
Janes, Preaton, Russel, Fruthy, Small, Kennedy, Huddart. 

T.C.S. — ^Bird, Macdonald, Lawson, Currie, Campbell i, Taylor ii, 
Lambert, Dobson, Fisher, Long, Fennell, Hawke i. 



SCHOOL vs, LAKEFIELD 
At Port Hope, February 24: Lost 2-1. 

Middleside was defeated 2-1 in their clash with Lake- 
field in a closely-contested game. In the first five minutes 
Shaw of Lakefield received a pass from Duff to score the 
first goal of the game. T.C.S. came back, keeping the puck 
in the Grove's end, but due to good goal-tending in the 
Grove net by Small the score remained at 1-0. 

In the second period the play was close and remained 
in centre-ice apart from two rushes by Gorden, one of 
which resulted in the Grove's second counter. Bird of 
T.C.S. got a break-away towards the end of the period but 
failed to score. In the third period the School ganged 
hard and kept the puck in the Lakefield end for most of 
the play. Shortly before the end of the game, Taylor 
passed back to Lambert on defence and the latter scored 
on a long shot. 

The final score was 2-1; Gorden, Preston and Sinclair 
starred for the Grove, while Bird and Macdonald played 
well for the School. 

Lakefield — Small, Widifield, Jones, Gorden, Sinclair, Shaw, miff, 
Preston, Freethy, Hutchings, Huddart. 

T.C.S. — Fennell, Fisher, Lawson, Lambert, Dobson, Macdonald, 
Hawke i. Bird, Currie, Campbell i, Taylor ii. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 59 

House Game, March 7 

The Middleside House game was played on very poor 
ice. Bethime winding up on the long end of an 11-7 score. 

At the end of the first period the score was tied 3-3; 
for Bethune, Lambert, Dobson and Taylor were the scorers, 
and Lawson, Bird and Payne tallied for Brent. In the 
second period the Bethunites were the lone scorers, with 
Campbell, Hawke i and Lambert all getting nice, unassisted 
goals. 

The final period brought a burst of strength from 
Bethune, and but for the very fine work of Curtis in the 
Brent goal the score might have been much greater. Bird 
scored Brent's first of this period on a long shot, followed 
soon by five goals for Bethune, Campbell i with two, Mc- 
Donough, Wells and Taylor ii getting the counters. In 
the last minutes of the game, when Macdonald was off for 
tripping. Brent came from behind to score three lovely 
goals. The first came from Lawson on a nice close-in 
shot, followed by Bird and Fisher who came in to score 
the final goals of the game. 

For Bethune, Taylor ii and Dobson were outstanding, 
and for Brent, Curtis played well in goal while Bird and 
Lawson also shone. 

Bethune — Hawke i, Macdonald, Campbell i, Taylor ii, McDon- 
ough, Wells, Dobson, Lambert, Vernon, Dobell ii, Goodbody. 

Breint — ^Bird, Lawson, Payne, Hyde, Ralph, Wilson, Fisher, Cur- 
tis, Jarvis. 



LITTLESIDE 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. 
At Toronto, February 3: Lost 6-3. 

Littleside played its return game with Upper Canada 
College in Toronto and ended up the losers by a 6-3 count. 

The School seemed stronger than in the first game, 
making many strong rushes on the College's net. Jarvis 



60 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

scored two goals for the School and was the most effective 
forward. Wells tallied the other T.C.S. goal and also led 
many threatening rushes. Goodbody played well in the 
nets, saving several almost sure goals. For Upper Canada, 
Wardrop and Bethune were outstanding; Orr played well 
in goal. 

U.C.C. — Kent, Cork, Backly, Todd, Kennedy, Rennie, Baaor, 
Bethune, Stewart, Hargraph, Wardrop, Masters, Orr. 

T.C.S. — Goodbody, Brewer, Dobell ii, Jarvis, Bronfman, Gaunt, 
Wells, Newcomb, Rogers, Brooks, Gumming. 



SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD 

At Lakefield, February 11: Won 12-2. 

In their third game of the season, Littleside over- 
whelmed a heavier Lakefield team 12-2 on very soft ice 
which slowed up play and made the puck very difficult to 
handle. 

In the first period, the Wells-Hyde combination 
counted for two goals while Rogers and Newcomb each 
netted one on passes from French ii and Dobell ii respec- 
tively. 

Featuring the second period was the team play and 
scoring of the School, Wells with two, both on passes from 
Gaunt, and Jarvis with two, Rogers assisting each time. 
Gordon scored Lakefield's first goal assisted by Jones. 

In the final period. Wells counted up his fifth score, 
again from Gaunt, gaining also two assists on goals by 
Hyde and Newcomb. Lone marksman for the Grove was 
Milner from Widderfield. 

In this game, Littleside definitely showed their superio- 
rity in passing and in agility around the net, although the 
home team were often dangerous in the last period. Best 
for the losers were Arteaga, Milner, and Widderfield on de- 
fence, while Gaunt on defence and the Hyde-Wells-New- 
comb line, led by Wells with five goals and two assists, 
shone for the School. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 63 

LAkefield — Small, Kennedy, Arteaga, Shaw, McDonnell, Russell, 
Deispecker, Milner, Childs, Drew, Widderfleld, Sterling, Fish, 
Reeve, Gordon, Hicks-Lyne, Jones. 

T.CLS. — Goodbody, Hyde, Wells, Newcomb, Dobell ii, Bronfman, 
French ii, Jarvis, Rogers, Brewer, Gaimt. 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. U.T.S. 
At Port Hope, February 10: Lost 8-7 

In its fourth game, which was very slow due to soft 
ice, Littleside "B" was closely beaten by the score of 8-7. 
Dolle, captain of the U.T.S. team, scored the first three 
goals of the game. However, at the beginning of the 
second period McPherson scored for T.C.S., and from then 
on the game was very close. In this period Avery, Procter 
and J. Stewart of U.T.S. and Gumming of T.C.S. played 
well, the last getting a goal from a long, hard shot 
from the right wing. In the third period, U.T.S. got only 
one goal, scored by Dolle. Littleside netted four, Brooks. 
Deverall, Gill and McPherson being the marksmen. 

McPherson and Gumming played well for T.G.S., while 
Dolle and Avery starred for U.T.S. 

U.T.S. — ^Mallenhauer, J. Stewart, Irwin, S. Stewart, Shoemaker, 
Dolle, Avery, MacDougall, Moore, Procter, Ponton. 

T.C.S. — de Pencier, Brodeur, Deverall, McLennan, Kingman, 
McPherson, Black, Gill, Dnimmond, Gumming, 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. COBOURG 
At Port Hope, Februarj- 14: Won 5-4, 

Although played on slow ice, this game proved very 
exciting, Littleside winning 5-4. In the first period Hessin 
and Campbell scored two goals for Cobourg. However, in 
the second period T.C.S. began to click and, after a third 
goal for Cobourg netted by Wilcox, Littleside got three in 
quick succession; these were scored by Kingman and Mc- 
Pherson. In the third period both teams fought hard, but 
Hessin of Cobourg netted his second goal of the game, 
making it 4-3. Within the last five minutes McPherson 



62 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

scored; then Black netted the winning goal and the score 
stood 5-4 for T.C.S. McPherson and Kingman starred for 
Littleside, and Hessin and Campbell played well for Co- 
bourg. 

Cobourg — Noble, Jamieson, Shaw, Medhurst, Wilcox, Hessin, 
Campbell, Bower, Black, Hellis. 

T.C.S. — de Pencier, Deverall, McLennan, Brodeur, Kingman, 
McPherson. Black, Gill, Cumming, Brooks. 



LITTLESIDE "B" vs. U.T.S. 
At Toronto, February 17: Lost 7-4. 

Their last game of the season resulted in Littleside 
"B" being defeated 7-4 in a return game with U.T.S. It 
was an exciting game and T.C.S. was only one goal behind 
in the middle of the third period. The first two goals 
were scored by Dolle, v/ho played a fine game for U.T.S. 
Kingman scored the School's first goal with a back-hand 
shot at the end of the first period. U.T.S. scored twice 
more on shots by J. Stewart and Dolle, and at the end of 
the second period each team scored again, with Kingman 
and Dolle being the marksmen. In the third period T.C.S. 
got two quick goals by Black and McPherson, and the play 
became very close. In the last four minutes, however, 
MacDougall of U.T.S. scored two goals, making the final 
score 7-4. Dolle, MacDougall and Avery played best for 
U.T.S. ; McPherson and Kingman starred for T.C.S. 

U.T.S. — MoUenhauer, J. Stewart, S. Stuart, Irwin, MacDougall, 
Avery, Dolle, Ponton, Shoemaker, Moore. 

T.C.S. — de Pencier, Deverall, McLennan, Brodeur, Kingman, Mc- 
Pherson, Black, Cumming, Brooks, Gill. 



House Match, March 8 



The Littleside House match resulted in a 10-0 victory 
for Bethune. The game began with both teams pressing 
hard, but after ten minutes Wells notched Bethune's first 
goal. Two more quickly followed, scored by Newcomb 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



63 



and Brewer, making it 3-0 at the end of the first period. 
At the beginning of the next, Wells got his second goal, 
French ii assisting. Two more were scored by Newcomb 
and McPherson. 

In the last period French ii scored a goal after a few 
minutes of play. This was followed by two more from 
Wells and Rogers. Hyde and Gumming of Brent played 
well in this period, getting many shots on Goodbody who 
played expertly in goal for Bethune. At the end of the 
period, Dobell ii notched another goal for Bethune and the 
game ended 10-0. Wells, Newcomb, Dobell ii and Good- 
body stood out for Bethune; Hyde was best for the Brent 
team. 

Bethune — Goodbody, Brewer, Dobell ii, Bronfman, McDonough, 
Newcomb, Wells, French ii, Rogers, McPherson, Kingman. 

Brent — Rickaby, Deverall, McLeiman, Gaunt, Hyde, Jarvis, 
PajTie, Gumming, Black, Barrow, Gill. 




64 TRINITY COT J. KG E SCHOOL RECORD 




bas 



keTba 




SCHOOL vs. OSHAWA COLLEGIATE 
At Port Hope, February 3: Lost 29-26, 

The School lost a close, hard-fought, exhibition game 
to Oshawa Collegiate, 29-26. Oshawa used a very tight 
man-for-man defence and tied up the T.C.S. team most 
effectively. It was not until the last few minutes of play 
that the School was able to beat this defence, and then it 
was too late. 

In the first half, the School outscored Oshawa 21-19, 
but all their baskets were the result of some very fast set- 
shots. Oshawa outplayed the School five by quite a mar- 
gin; the School, not being used to their type of defence, 
were greatly hampered in attack, and found it very difficult 
to untrack themselves and set up any good plays. 

The last half featured very close checking and scoring 
was kept to a minimum. The School improved consider- 
ably, but were very unlucky under Oshawa's basket, miss- 
ing many lay-up shots and being outscored 10-5. It was 
anybody's game until the final whistle, but Oshawa were 
on the ball a little faster than the School and deserved to 
win. 

Patte and Seeley were outstanding for Oshawa, Patte 
sinking six and Seeley making two baskets and a foul shot. 
French, Drew and Wade were the best for T.C.S. 

Oshawa^— Patte, Roaa, Seeley, Stafford, DeU, Smithers, Heas, 
Lindsay. 



TRINITY COLJ-.EGE SCHOOL RECORD 65 

T.CS. — French, Wade, Warner, Drew, Carhartt, Hare, EJdmonds, 
LJg«rtwood, Hlbbard, Taylor i. 



SCHOOL vs. BOWMANVILLE 

AT Port Hoi>e, February' 7: Lost 47-83 

T.CS. lost the second game of the season by the score 
of 47-33, partly due to the tight, man-for-man Bovvman- 
ville defence which proved most effective. 

The first quarter saw the best basketball of the game. 
Both teams were checking hard, although neither were 
taking any chances, and the quarter-time score stood at 
8-8. 

The start of the second period saw Bowmanville run 
up a quick eight point lead against the School's second 
team, which lead they maintained throughout the period 
by means of excellent passing. The half-time score was 
28-17 for Bowmanville. 

In the second half, the School seemed more puzzled 
than ever against the Bowmanville attack. They were 
poor under their own basket, and seemed unable to retain 
possession of the ball in the Bowmanville end. Bowman- 
ville's snappy passing seemed to baffle the School's zone, 
and twice Rundle scored from close in centre. The full 
time score was 47-33. 

Drew and Carhartt were high scorers for T.C.S., with 
eight points apiece, while French gathered seven. Clemence 
and McHveen were best for the winners, the former scoring 
fourteen points. 

Bovrmanville — Mcllveen, Cramp, Sturrock, Rundle, Wilcox, 
Clemence, Bown, Passant, Moffatt. 

T.CS. — French, Toole, Drew, Wade, Carhartt, Warner, Ligert- 
wood, Taylor i, Edmonds, Hare, Hlbbard. 



66 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH 
At Port Hope, February 9: Lost 40-26 

The School lost to the Peterborough basketball team 
in their second encounter, 40-26. Although starting fast, 
the School had only a one point lead at half-time, and were 
completely overwhelmed by the fast passing attack of 
Peterborough in the last half. 

The first quarter started fast with T.C.S. forcing the 
play and outscoring their opponents. Peterborough seem- 
ed to be stymied by the School's good defence and only 
scored five points, while T.C.S. netted twelve. 

Peterborough gradually came to life in the second 
quarter, and did more and better checking on the defence. 
The tempo of the game increased but the School passes 
did not click at all. The score at half time was 18-17. 

Usmg short, fast passes, Peterborough began to crack 
the T.C.S. defence during the third period, and they held 
most of the play. The T.C.S. attack seemed unable to get 
started and they were on the short end of a 29-24 score as 
the period ended. 

In the final quarter Peterborough outscored the School 
11-2. The T.C.S. defence was powerless to stop them and 
when they got a break-away, poor passing nullified any 
attempt to score. 

Esthick of Peterborough was high scorer of the game, 
netting fourteen points, while Wade was best for T.C.S. 
with twelve points. Toole played a good defensive game 
for the School, but the outstanding feature of the Peter- 
borough squad was their quick, accurate passing. 

Peterborough — Lee, Esthick, Thompson, Plunkett, Rooke, Ric- 
hardson, Brown, Colbirs, Courtney. 

T.C.S. — French, Toole, Drew, Wade, Warner, Llgertwood. 



SCHOOL vs. COBOURG 
At Cobourg, February 14: Won 56-33 

T.C.S. won its group of the C.O.S.S.A. Senior league 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 67 

for the second year in a row by defeating Cobourg Col- 
legiate, 56-33. 

The School out-played Cobourg in the first quarter, 
despite the small, unfamiliar floor, and were on top 8-3 at 
quarter-time. Play was more even in the second stanza 
with the School sinking many set shots from beyond the 
key-hole. T.C.S. increased their lead and at half-time the 
score was 20-11. 

The third period was a repetition of the second, the 
School having the edge on the play, and the quarter ended 
at 42-29. T.C.S. opened up in the last quarter and carried 
the play completely. They missed many chances to score, 
but kept Cobourg bottled up in their own end and pre- 
vented them from setting up anj^ dangerous attacks. The 
final score was 56-33 for the School. 

The game was outstanding for the very smart passing 
by the School, and they showed great improvement over 
their three previous league games. The attack was slow- 
ed considerably by the small floor, but they adapted them- 
selves quickly and played "heads-up" basketball. Cobourg 
was very good under their own basket, checking the School 
ver\- closely, but they lacked finesse at the School's end. 

Dawe and Anderson were the best for Cobourg while 
for the School, Drew and French were both effective on 
the forward line, and Toole was good defensively as well as 
contributing five baskets to the total. 

Cobourg — Anderson, Hoselton, AUender, Dawe, Curtis, McGuire, 
Bell, Hume. 

T.C.S. — French i, Toole, Wade, Drew, Warner, Carhartt, Hare, 
Ligertwood, Hibbard. 



SCHOOL vs. TRENTON R.C.A.F. 

At Port Hope, February 15: Lost 34-16 

In an exhibition game with the Trenton Fliers, T.C.S. 
lost 34-16. Despite the score, the School played a good 
game against a much more experienced team. 

Play started evenly with close checking by each team, 



68 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL PIECORD 

and there was no scoring during the first few minutes of 
play. The Air Force, however, had more finish around the 
basket and led 10-6 at quarter-time. 

There were only two baskets scored in a rather slow 
second quarter. Although the R.C.A.F. had most of the 
play, the T.C.S. defence kept them out and the score was 
12-8 at half-time. 

Trenton ran wild in the third quarter, scoring four- 
teen points. The School were put completely on the de- 
fensive during the almost continual attack by the Fliers, 
scoring only three baskets. 

The final period was even, but fairly slow, with Tren- 
ton dominating the play although failing to score. The 
final score was 34-16 for the Air Force. 

Although only scoring one basket, Zeaton was the best 
man on the floor, directing the attack of the R.C.A.F. and 
many times breaking up School threats. Wade and French 
were best for T.C.S. , while Chote was also good for Tren- 
ton, scoring fourteen points. 

Trenton — Hoyle, Bundly, McGregor, Chote, Zeaton, F^eailver, 
Ingham. 

T.CS. — French, Toole, Drew, Wade, Carhartt, Warner. 



SCHOOL vs. TRENTON GIRLS 
At Port Hope, February 17: Lost 27-18. 

In their first and only game of the season, the Senior 
T.C.S. female basketball team was defeated by the score 
of 27-18 by an older and slightly more experienced Air 
Force team. The game was fast and even, and although 
the checking was close, neither team seemed to mind. 

The first quarter opened with a subdued plop, as Miss 
Myrtle Ligertwood's wig fell off on the opening tip-off, but 
despite this, the School was able to run up a rather con- 
vincing quarter-time lead of 12-4. The second period saw 
Trenton bravely fighting for the needed counters, and by 
half-time, fully recovered from their initial surprise, they 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 69 

had rolled up nine points while the T.C.S. Misses had only- 
reached the fourteen mark. 

In the second half the Trenton team changed their 
tactics slightly. As a result, the dangerous T.C.S. break- 
aways ended with Oily and her girls in possession of the 
ball. Only a few of the frequent whistles (not all by the 
referee) were for fouls. This encouraged Trenton and 
spurred on by the unanimous support of the cheering on- 
lookers the Trenton team had taken the lead at three- 
quarter time by 19-16. The School, now playing without 
their wigs, seemed lost without this vital article, and were 
able to score only one basket in the last period. The final 
score stood at 27-18 for the Trenton ladies. 

Trenton — ^Mandell, Kinton, Aldred, Looker, Mcintosh, McGavin. 
T.C.S. — Ligertwood, Edmonds, Hare, Hibbard, McDowell, Wis- 
mer, Mahaffy, Gilbert, Sinclair. 



SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE 
At T.C.S., February 21: Won 55-52 

In the final league game for this group, T.C.S. emerged 
victorious in an exciting overtime game, 55-52. Paced by 
Drew and Carhartt, with nineteen and fourteen points 
respectively, the School came from behind many times dur- 
ing the game to tie it up, and surged ahead in the five 
minute overtime period to win. 

The first period started rather slowly. The School 
jumped into an early lead, but were unable to hold it due 
to ragged passing and poor guarding under the basket. The 
quarter-time score was 10-9 for the School. The second 
stanza speeded up considerably, but play was still wild, 
neither team showing very good passing; consequently, 
the ball went from one team to the other every few seconds. 
Port Hope scored several long shots, Currelly and Watson 
being the marksmen, while the School drove in under the 
basket well, but seemed unable to cover up around their 
own. The half-time score was 21-19 for Port Hope. 



70 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Trinity opened the second half with four quick baskets, 
but then lost their lead. The play continued scrambly, 
although it was better than the first half, and at quarter- 
time, the score stood tied at 33-33. In the final quarter, 
the School showed marked improvement and retained 
possession of the ball during most of it. Port Hope was 
still deadly on long shots, and were driving in hard under 
the School's basket, which was very poorly guarded 
throughout the game. At full time, the score was again 
tied at 45-45. In a five minute overtime. Trinity showed 
excellent combination to score ten points to Port Hope's 
seven, making the final score 55-52. 

The shooting of Drew and Carhartt stood out for 
Trinity, while Watson and Currelly were best for the 
losers. 

port Hope — Watson, CuiTelly, White, Bosnell, Barnard, Blsset. 

T.C.S. — French i, Toole, Drew, Wade, Carhartt, Warner, Ligert- 
wood, Hare, Edmonds, Taylor i, Hibbard. 



SCHOOL vs. PICKERING 
At Toronto, February 23: Lost 27-19 

The School lost a hard-fought game to Pickering Col- 
lege by a score of 27-19. Pickering out-played us by a 
wide margin, but our zone defence prevented them from 
getting loose under our basket. 

In the first quarter the School was over-anxious and 
play was scrambly. At quarter-time the score was tied, 
10-10. The second frame produced much better basket- 
ball, with Pickering carrying the greater part of the play. 
The School checked very well, but at half-time were on 
the short end of a 16-12 score. 

Pickering began to click in the last half and were well 
in control of the game. They sank many set shots and 
prevented T.C.S. from making any good breaks or setting 
up their attack. The final score was 27-19 for Pickering. 

In losing to Pickering, the School played their best 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 71 

game of the year. Our zone defence was good and there 
was never an uncovered man under the T.C.S. basket. The 
Pickering team have been champions of Toronto and dis- 
trict for two years in a row, and were very fast in setting 
up their zone. The School team deserves much praise for 
holding them to such a close score. Richardson, Budgeon 
and Lervice were the best for Pickering, and Toole, French 
and Wade stood out for the School. 

Pickering — Robb, Kent, McDonald, Lervice, Kernahan, Budgeon, 
B. RicJiardson, E. Richardson, McGouan, Revers. 

T.C.S. — Wade, Carhartt, Prencli, Edmonds, Hare, Drew, Ligert- 
wood, Warner, Toole. 



SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH COLLEGIATE 
At Port Hope, March 2: Won 39-38 

In a fast and hard-fought tussle, T.C.S. took a six 
point lead over Peterborough Collegiate in the first game 
of the finals of the C.O.S.S.A. Senior group, total baskets 
in the home-and-home game to count. Both T.C.S. and 
P.C.I, showed effective zone defences and team play was 
excellent; but remarkable passing was the game's main 
feature. The best basketball came in the last quarter, 
both teams fighting with everything they had, T.C.S. 
seemed to have the edge and managed to maintain a small 
lead until the final whistle. 

Hare, Drew with ten baskets, and French and Car- 
hartt with four each, were the School's best. For Peter- 
borough, Rooke played a strong guard, while Thompson 
and Lee stood out as their high scorers. 

Peterborough — Rooke, Thompson, Lee, Estlick, Plimkett, Mc- 
Tavish, Courtney, Brown, Collins, Whittaker. 

T.C.S. — French i, Drew, Wade, Toole, Warner, Carhartt, Ligert- 
wood, Hare, Edmonds, Taylor. 



72 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. PETERBOROUGH 
At Peterborough, March 7: Lost 44-26. 

The School went to Peterborough with a six point lead 
and with high hopes of winning the championship. The 
game started with fiery play from both teams, the ball 
going through many hands. Peterborough opened the 
scoring on a foul, and from then on it seemed to be Peter- 
borough's game. They led 21-15 at half-time and increased 
their total to 44-26 by the end. It was a hard game to 
lose but T.C.S. went down fighting gamely. The basket- 
ball was ragged, and could by no means compare with that 
of the first game. 

Richardson of Peterborough, with seven baskets, stood 
out as the star of the game; Drew and French were best 
for the School. 

Peterborough — Richardson, Lee, Thompson, Esthick, Plunkett, 
Rooke, Courtney, Brown, Collins, McTavish, Whittaker, Mathews. 

T.C.S. — French, Drew, Wade, Toole, Warner, Carhartt, Ligert- 
wood, Hare, Edmonds, Taylor. 



House Game, March 14 



Brent won the Bigside Basketball House game this 
year by the narrow margin of one point. The final score 
was 31-30. 

Brent easily carried the play in the first quarter and 
outscored Bethune 9-6. The Brent House team was on the 
ball very fast and moved around a great deal, leaving the 
Bethune boys in their wake. Bethune was outplayed again 
in the second quarter and Brent maintained their lead; the 
score at half-time stood at 15-12. 

In the third quarter Bethune played much better but 
were unable to overcome Brent's lead and the margin re- 
mained the same, 25-22. The game opened up in the last 
quarter and for the first time Bethune carried the play, 
but despite their superiority they were careless under 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 73 

Brent's basket, whereas Brent missed only a few scoring 
possibilities. The final score was Brent 31, Bethune 30. 

Brent House is to be congratulated on winning the 
game as they were decidedly the "under-dogs". They were 
fast to pick up the ball and kept the Bethune lads on the 
run most of the game. It looked very much as if Bethune 
were suffering from over-confidence, but they did pull out 
of it in the last quarter, playing quite well. 

For Brent, Drew was outstanding, leading the team 
from every position on the floor and sinking eight baskets. 
Carhartt also played well, making ten points. For the 
losers. Wade was the best, scoring nineteen of his team's 
points. Toole played his usual good game at guard and 
also made most of Bethune's scoring plays. 

Brent — ^Drew, Carhartt, McDowell, Sinclair, Wismer, Bird, 
Mahaffy, Taylor i, Hibbard, Wilson i. 

Bethune — French i, Toole. Wade, Warner, Hare, Ligertwood, 
Edmonds. 



JUNIOR BASKETBALL 



The Junior Basketball Team was entered this year in 
the C.O.S.S.A. Junior League. The material was not what 
it might have been, but what the team lacked in experience, 
they made up in spirit, never giving up. They played four 
league games, two with Port Hope and two with Cobourg: 
all were lost, but valuable experience was gained for next 
year when many of these boys will be playing on the first 
team. 

The team was as follows: — McDowell, Wismer, White- 
head. Mahaffy, Watts. Crowe, Huxley, Evans, Scott i, Rid- 
deU. 



74 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. SEA CADET SHIP SKEENA 
At Port Hope, Februarj- 29: Won 44-29 

The game started out fast with T.C.S. acquiring an 
immediate advantage on a series of well-aimed, long shots. 
This advantage was retained until near the end of the 
first half when the Sea Cadets played slowly towards a 
tie. Then, in the second half, T.C.S. jumped ahead again 
to win by the fairly wide margin of 44-27. The game 
throughout was fast, and was played hard by both teams. 
T.C.S. had very good, long shots combined with some well 
timed run-in baskets, while the Cadets gained the majority 
of their points on lay-up shots. 

cadets — Trenouth i, Trenouth ii, Bailey, Snelgrove, Lees, Pol- 
lard, Trumper, White, Benen, Cain, Holland, Hlrcock, McGuire. 

T.C.S. — ^Wismer, Whitehead, Watts, McDowell, Evans, Ma- 
haffy, Crowe, Scott i. 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 75 

LITTLE BIG-FOUR SQUASH TOURNAMENT 

At Toronto, Marth S. 

Ridley again won the Little Big-Four Squash Tourna- 
ment with T.C.S. and U.C.C. once more placing second and 
third. The tournament was much more keenly and ex- 
pertly contested than last year, and from all reports seems 
to have been one of high calibre. 

T.C.S. defeated U.C.C. in the morning but were edged 
out by B.R.C. in the afternoon. Ridley defeated U.C.C. 
and \\'ere therefore winners of the Gibson Trophy. Howard 
was judged to be the best player in the tournament. 

Our sincere thanks go to the Badminton and Racquet 
Club for the use of their courts. We hope this tournament 
will become a permanent Little Big-Four competition and 
that the friendly rivalry which has been so prominent in 
the first two years will remain a feature. 

T.C.S. vs. RIDLEY 

E. Howard defeated S. E. Rowe 15-10, 12-15, 15-9, 17-15 

P. C. Dobell lost to S. Christie 15-11, 17-15, 16-17, 12-15, 15-11 

J. R. McMurrich lost to P. H. Cressall 15-6, 11-15, 15-11, 15-9 

P. M. Bird lost to R. P. Browne 15-6, 15-2, 18-17 

R. A. Hope lost to A. Jarvis 15-6, 13-17, 15-7, 10-15, 15-8 

T.C.S. vs. U.C.C. 

E. Howard defeated M. B. Symons 15-11, 15-4, 15-8 

P. C. Dobell defeated T. Chisholm 15-12, 14-18, 15-9,' 15-7 

J. R. McMurrich defeated C. Greey 15-10, 17-14, 15-6 

P. M. Bird defeated C. Thompson 15-9, 15-11, 15-7 

R. A. Hope defeated D. Webster 15-4, 15.5, 15.3 



76 



TRINITY COULEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




E(iitor-in-Chief M. E. Wright 

Assistants D. A. Chester, T. G. R. Brinckman, 

P. T. Macklem, P. B. Mackenzie. 

Spring has hit us early this year! At the time of 
writing some blind enthusiasts are already talking cricket! 
The would-be nudists of the J.S. are already rushing the 
season by endeavouring to escape outside with the mini- 
mum of suitable clothing and footwear! 

Having been bereft of ice somewhat earlier than usual, 
the J.S. has turned to basketball during the last few weeks. 
Quite a lot of hidden talent has been brought to light and 
everybody seems to have enjoyed the games. 

The standard of gym. work has been high in the J.S. 
this year and the Gym. Competition promises to be a good 
one. 

There is a very good entry for the Boxing Competi- 
tion, and there should be some excellent bouts and very stiff 
competition in some of the senior weights. 




J.S. HOCKEY TEAM, 1945 
Back Row. — H. C. McConnell, C. J. Tottenham, Esq., J. B. Rogers, J. S. Knox. 
Middle Row.—R. J. Moffitt, J. F. D. Boulden, N. F. Thompson (Capt.), D. V. Ketchum. 
Front Row: — C. E. deL. Panet, T. C. Potter, M. E. Wright, H. E. Thompson, 
W. R. Wyman. 




Pirtures by Macklem, Gill, van Straubenzee 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 77 

A number of the J.S. enjoyed a day of spring skiing 
at the School Ski Camp recently. The trails in the woods 
were very fast and spills were frequent! 

Our thanks to Hope and Roenisch for refereeing our 
home hockey games and also to Pete Britton for officiating 
at the Ridley game. The grand job they all did is much 
appreciated. 

Our best wishes go with Peter Blake, who is returning 
home to England. 



THE STORM 



So far it had been a quiet night, peaceful and majestic. 
There had been no wind and every little sound seemed 
magnified tenfold in the silence. Suddenly the wind fresh- 
ened and a few drops of rain spattered on the foliage. Then 
it was quiet again. Once more the wind came, redoubled 
in force, and the rain returned as well. By now the wind 
was a powerful gale, whipping through the trees at great 
speed and moaning amongst the leaves. The gentle rain 
turned into a torrential downpour which obliterated all 
vision and beat the grass to a sodden pulp. With the rain 
came lightning and thunder. Soon came a splintering 
crash and, split asunder, a mighty oak crashed to the 
ground. The havoc continued until early morning when a 
bright summer dawn brought relief to the ruined land. 

— Brinckman, IIAI. 



NATURE WINS AGAIN 



The blizzard had been raging for the last hour. The 
Eskimo struggled on, lashing his team of husky dogs to 
make them move faster. The icy snow beat his face till 
the blood ran from his cheeks and dribbled from his mouth. 
Finally, in desperation, he emptied his load of valuable furs 
in an effort to lighten the sleigh. For a while the game 
dogs moved faster, but soon they slowed again. The man 



78 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

whipped with greater fury, but the gallant animals could 
go no faster. The wind was howling like a demon now, 
and it was so strong that the man bent double to move 
against it. Then, one of the huskies whimpered and col- 
lapsed pitifully in the snow. The Eskimo went up to the 
dog and, with numb, frost-bitten fingers, unstrapped him 
from his harness. He kicked the body aside and struggled 
back to the sled. Once more they moved, only this time 
at a perceptibly slower pace. Now the team was passing 
under an overhanging cliff which groaned ominously. Sud- 
denly, a terrific blast of wind shook it and the immense 
pile of snow thundered down on the tiny sled. The Eskimo 
screamed in terror and tried to run. It was too late. His 
body was tossed into the air and flung, like a leaf, a hun- 
dred yards away 

***** 

Far into the night the blizzard raged. At dawn the 

chill Arctic sun came up and looked down on the small, 

lifeless body of the Eskimo who fought too long against 

Nature. 

— Brinckman, IIAI. 



HOCKEY 

Captain of Hockey N. F. Thompson 

Vice-Captain J. F. D. Boulden 

Captain of 2nd. Team R. M. Hogarth 

Playing in several matches against strong opposition, 
the hockey team this year gave a good account of itself. 
It was an extremely well balanced team in which the 
players showed excellent team play. This was especially 
noticeable in the return game at the Grove, and also 
against U.C.C. It is not very often that a hockey season 
ends with a team "breaking even" on goals scored for and 
against; this year's team scored eighteen goals and had 
the same number scored against them. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 79 

Colours 

The following have been awarded First Team Hockey 
Colours : — 

N. F. Thompson (Capt), J. F. D. Boulden, R. J. Mof- 
fit, H. E. Thompson, W. R. Wyman, J. S. Knox, D. V. Ket- 
chimi, T. C. Potter. 



SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE 
At Port Hope, February 3: Lost 6-2 

Due to lack of time, it was only possible to play two 
periods of this game. In the first period the Grove show- 
ed much more aggressive hockey than the School and 
scored four goals. The School came back well in the last 
period which was a hard-fought one, with both teams 
scoring two goals. 

Final score: Grove 6, T.C.S. 2. 

T.C.S. — Thompson i (Capt.), Boulden, Potter, Moffitt, Thomp- 
son ii. Wjnnan i, Knox i, Hughes, Ketchum i, Rogers, Wright (goal); 
sub: Panet. 



SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. PREP. 

At Port Hope, February 11: Won 8-1. 

This game was played under very unfavourable con- 
ditions due to a "February thaw". In spite of the wet ice 
the School team played its best game of the season, show- 
ing excellent team play and a very aggressive spirit. U.C.C. 
were undoubtedly handicapped by the bad ice and strange 
rink, and did not really show much attack until the last 
period in which they held the School scoreless and scored 
one goal. T.C.S. scored four goals in each of the first two 
periods. 

Final score: T.C.S. 8, U.C.C. 1. 

T.C.S. — Thompson i (Capt.), Boulden, Wyman i, Moffitt, Potter, 
Thompson ii, Panet, Knox i, Ketchum i, Hughes, Rogers, McComiell, 
Wright (goal). 



80 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE 
At Lakefield, February 15: Lost 4-8 

Lakefield opened the game very strongly by scoring 
two goals in the first five minutes of play. The rest of the 
first period was fairly evenly divided, with the School 
getting some good opportunities to score which they were 
unable to make the most of. In the second period the play 
was very close with Lakefield scoring one goal. T.C.S. 
staged a good come-back in the last period, scoring three 
goals and tieing the score, until about two minutes before 
the end of play when the Grove scored the winning goal. 
Final score: Grove 4, T.C.S. 3. 

T.C.S. — Thompson i, Boulden, Wyman i, Moffit, Potter, Thomp- 
son ii, Panet, Knox i, Ketchum i, Rogers, McConnell, Hughes, 
Wright (goal). 



SCHOOL vs. RIDLEY 
At Toronto, March 7. Lost 7-5. 

Although both teams had been seriously short of prac- 
tice for the ten days preceding this game, both sides show- 
ed some very good hockey, and the game was a very hard- 
fought one. Slightly superior work by the Ridley goalie 
really turned the game in their favour. Final score: Rid- 
ley 7, T.C.S. 5. 

T.CS. — ^Thompson i, Boulden, Wyman i. Potter, Panet, Thomp- 
son li, Knox 1, Ketchum i, McConneU, Rogers, Wright (goal). 



2nd. Team Games 



School vs. The Grove, at Lakefield, February 1: T.C.S. 
5, Grove 0. 

School vs. The Grove, at Port Hope, February 14: 
T.C.S. 13, Grove 2. 

T.CS. — Hogarth (Captain), Grout, McDerment, Ketchum U, 
McConnell, Southam, Mackenzie i, Bate, McGill, Thornton, Peters, 
Hughe.s, Woods i (goal). 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



81 



House Game 

Owing to the lack of ice, it was necessary to play a 
sudden-death game this year instead of the usual series of 
three games. Rigby were more aggressive throughout the 
game, although Orchard did press them hard at times. 
Rigby scored one goal in each period and Orchard scored 
once in the third period. Final score: Rigby 3, Orchard 1. 

Rigby: — Boulden (Capt.), Wyman i, Grout, Thompson ii. Potter, 
Panet, Southam, Ketchum i, Rogers, Stratford (goal). 

OrcJiard: — Thompson i (Capt.), Ketchum ii, McGill, Peters, Mc- 
Demnent, Knox i, McConnell, Hogarth, Woods i (goal). 



VALETE 

Blake, Peter M Nevil S. Godwin, Esq., 

British Embassy, Washington, D.C. 

Foster, D. A Sqn. Ldr. The Rev. 

Donald A. Foster, 

Birmingham, England. 

Mathews, J. W. M Mrs. J. C. Hope, 

444 Clarke Ave., Westmount, P.Q. 




g2 TRXNITY COLiEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



dO\S 




NOTES < 




OLD BOYS' NOTES— I— On Active Service 
HONOURS 

Flight Lieutenant Bob Keefer ('29-'36) was awarded 
the Distinguished Flying Cross for great gallantry in the 
performance of his duty while serving with No. 540 Squa- 
dron of the Royal Air Force. The citation on which this 
award was made reads as follows: 

"Flight Lieutenant Keefer has taken part in both 
bombing missions and photographic reconnaissances. He 
has attacked some of the most heavily defended targets in 
Germany. On one occasion during a daylight attack 
against Brest, his aircraft was heavily engaged by Ger- 
man fighters. By fine airmanship he enabled his gunners 
to shoot down a Messerschmitt 109. More recently, this 
oflBcer has flown on reconnaissances over most of occupied 
Europe and in addition he took part in several low level 
sorties to photograph enemy troop movements and flying 
bomb sites in the Pas de Calais. Throughout Flight Lieu- 
tenant Keefer has shown a high standard of airmanship 
and he has never let either adverse weather or enemy 
opposition deter him from completing his missions." 
* « * * « 

Squadron Leader J. W. Langmuir ('35-'40) was award- 
ed the Distinguished Flying Cross for "courage and devo- 
tion to duty on operations against the enemy, while serving 
in Canada with the R.C.A.F." 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 83 

Flying Officer Philip A. Wood ('37-'39) has been 
awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for meritorious 
service. He had participated in thirty-nine sorties over 

France and Germany. 

* # * * * 

Major C. F. Harrington ('26-'30), R.C.A.. was men- 
tioned in despatches in January, 1945, while serving in 
Italv. 



WOUNDED 



Major Harry Godshall ('26-'33) was wounded on 
January 1, 1945, but is back in action. Harry went over- 
seas on December 31, 1942, and was awarded the Bronze 
Star for "meritorious achievement" early in 1944. 

***** 

Lieutenant T. Alan Staunton ('30-'34) was reported 
wounded February 27, but remained on duty. 

***** 

Lieutenant Ross LeMesurier ('38-'42) was wounded 
during the current fighting near the Rhine while serving 
with the British Army. While his condition was reported 
"not serious" he suffered second degree bums in the face 
and shrapnel woimds in the right arm and scalp. Ross 
has recovered sufficiently to return to active duty. 



N.A. 2 "Nels" Stewart ('38-'44) has started a course 
in England with Ian Macdonald ('39-'43) and Jock Gour- 
lay ('37-'43). Ford Jones ('36-'44) is one course ahead. 
While in Halifax, Nels ran into Skip Finley ('33-'40), Bob 
Morris ('33-'44), Ian Tate ('34-'41), George Hampson ('36- 
'39), Bim Waters ('36-'39) and Ken Scott ('40-'43). Dur- 
ing four days leave in London he met Jim Thompson ('37- 
'39) and Fred Huycke ('37-'43) in Portsmouth. Bob Morris 
was recently home on leave. 



34 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Ensign Grant Neville ('26-'31) writes: "I am at last 
getting sea duty." His address is: — L.C.I.L. Flotilla 35, 
c/o F.P.O. San Francisco, California, U.S.A. 



Lieut.-Col. E. J. Ketchum ('09-'ll) has been appointed 
Administrative Officer to the newly formed infantry train- 
ing centre at Petawawa. 

L.A.C. P. J. Giffen ('36-'39) has been demobilized from 
the R.C.A.F. since January 1, 1945, and is now doing post- 
graduate work in political science and economics at the 

University of Toronto. 

***** 

Major George Renison ('33-'38) is now 2-I/C of the 
48th. Highlanders of Canada, having reverted to go back 

with his unit. 

* * * * * 

Lieut.-Cmdr. John T. Band ('25-'31), R.C.N.V.R., is 
CO. of the frigate "Swansea", operating in the United 
Kingdom area for the past year, during which time he 
actively participated in the destruction of three German 
submarines. John Barvd, Jr., is entered at the School at 

eleven years in 1953. 

***** 

Major George Hees ('22-'27), who was wounded early 
in the year, participated in the Grey North elections as 
a guest speaker on the Progressive-Conservative Platform. 

***** 

David Russel ('37-'42), Dick Atkin ('39-'42) and Bruce 
Sully ('40-'42) are all at the Technical Training School. 
R.C.A.F., training as Flight Engineers. 

***** 

Captain Dudley Dawson ('26-'31) has returned from 
overseas and is now attached to the American Army, serv- 
ing in the Pacific area. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 85 

Ord/Smn. B. P. Hayes ('40-'43) has finished a long 
course in radar and is now on embarkation leave. 



Ord/Smn. Larry Clarke ('40-'43) has had a sudden 
illness in Toronto and is convalescing in Christie Street 
Hospital. Best wishes for a speedy recovery. 

* * * * *,; 

F/L. D'Arcy Macdonald ('29-'30) is a Medical Officer 
with the R.C.A.F. and plans to be married in April. 

***** 

Squadron Leader Garth Macdonald ('22-'27) is on the 
staff of the Deputy Judge Advocate General, Headquarters, 
Ottawa, and has been sent to the Southern States. 

***** 

Major Andy Duncanson ('26-'32), back in England 
after service in Burma, is expected in Canada before long. 
Lieut. John Duncanson ('33-'41) is now based in New- 
foundland with the R.C.N.V.R. 

***** 

A/LA "Froggie" Symons ('38-'43) is reported down 
with scarlet fever in Collins Bay Camp. Kingston. 

***** 

A.B. Jim Parr ('31-'41) has completed his course suc- 
cessfully at Cornwallis making him a gunnery ratino- 
second class. Jim visited the School while on leaVe after 
a year's destroyer service at sea. He is now at H.M.C.S. 
Peregrine waiting to be drafted to another ship. 

***** 
Cadet Officer D. D. Macdonald ('41-'42) has completed 
two trips to Australia and Central American ports, and is 
now somewhere in the South West Pacific carrying sup- 
plies to the American Forces. 



gg TRINITY COIX.EGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Captain A. H. Humble went overseas in February. 

* * * * * 

A.C.2 Paul LeBrooy ('36-39) has been demobilized 
from the R.C.A.F. and is now taking a commerce course 

at McGill University. 

***** 

Ted Hungerford ('42-'44) writes: "I graduated from 
the air gunnery course at Mont Joli on January 5, and was 
one of the six who got their commissions. It is certainly 
nice being a Pilot Officer, but rather short lived, as I was 
released into the reserve on February 16. I had had hopes 
of going on operations so was very much disappointed; 
perhaps if Canada gets into the Pacific war in a big way 
I will get my chance". At present, Ted is working on his 
senior matriculation at what used to be No. 6 I.T.S. and 
hopes to go on to Mining Engineering at University. 
***** 

Flight Lieutenant M. Macdonald ('10-'13) has been 
transferred to the Reserve of Officers, R.C.A.F., as of 

August 24, 1944. 

***** 

Tpr. Peter LeBrooy ('36-'39) has been home on a 
month's leave after fifteen months under battle conditions 
in the front lines. 

***** 

Major R. D. Mulholland ('16-'22) is in England, having 

flown over in May, 1944. 

**«>** 

Brigadier-General Sir E. O. Wheeler ('03-'07) writes 
from Delhi, India, that he met "Dusty" Rhodes (Brigadier- 
General Sir G. D. Rhodes ('04-'01), K.C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O.) 

***** 

A.B. Ed. Gordon ('42-'43) is serving in H.M.C.S. 
"Whitby", and while overseas saw Al Wheeler ('41-'43) 
who was getting ready to go on leave. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 87 

Mids. p. B. Heaton ('38-'42) is serving in H.M.S. 
"Puncher"; he expects to go on destroyer duty for four 
months and then receive his stripe. 



F/0. J. C. Cawley ('38-'42) has been posted to Eng- 
land after doing instructional duty in Canada, and is fly- 
ing Mustangs and Spitfires on operations. He went over- 
seas with P/0. Joe McCullough ('35-'38) and Sergt. Air 
Gunner Tommy Caldwell ('38-'42). The latter is now 
stationed at a heavy conversion unit. He has seen P/O. 
Craig Somerville ('31-'41) who is recovering from a crash 
in an Oxford, in which his instructor was killed, and ran 
into F/0. Charlie Burrows ('38-'40) who mentioned having 
met Wing Cmdr. Dal Russel ('26-'34) in London. 

***** 

Ldeut.-Cmdr. Eric Harrington ('28-'31) has been in 
command of the frigate H.M.S. "Seacliff" since last Sep- 
tember. 

***** 

Sub-Lieut. Pete Cayley ('37-'40), who has been serving 
in H.M.C.S. "Assiniboine" since last June, has seen Lieut. 
Pete Spragge ('28-'31) at Londonderry. Pete is Captain 
of H.M.C.S. "Petrolia". He has also run into Lieut. Harry 
Hyndman ('35-'37), R.C.N., who is No. 1 in H.M.C.S. 

"Chaudiere". 

***** 

Lieut. Howard Smith ('33-'37) is with the Army Film 
Unit, attached to C.M.H.Q., London, and much to his dis- 
gust has spent all his time in England. He has done one 
film on the Red Cross, which will be used throughout 
Canada during the present Red Cross Campaign. 
***** 

Captain Bob Smith ('33-'37) has been in hospital in 
Belgium with diphtheria and expects to be returned to 
England shortly. 



88 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Squadron Leader Jack Langmuir ('35-'40) is attached 
to Squadron 422 in England, and is taking a special course 
at the Cranwell Air Force College. 



Chaplain and Hon. Capt. Ted Brain ('23-'26). M.C., 
while convalescing in hospital, was visited by Hon. Major 
''Sister" Boulden and Capt. Jack Defries ('23-'26). Now 
and again he has seen Brigadier Jock Spragge ('18-'24) 
and speaks very highly of the splendid work he is doing. 

Lieut. Peter Storms ('34-'38) writes: "One day last 
July, I was driving into Caen, and on the highway I passed 
a man with a great cloud of tobacco smoke trailing behind 
him. He was dirty and his clothes were a mess. The 
only clean thing about him was a clean towel over his 
shoulder. I drove past him, but there was something 
vaguely familiar about his walk. I had seen it before! I 
turned the jeep and went back, and out through the grime 
came a great, broad smile — it was the "Tiger of Bethune" 
— Speechly. 

"He had just come out of the line and was going for 
a dip in the local stream. He has lost a great number of 
his men and has had a pretty rough go of it, but he is 
still his old cheerful self. We talked a great deal of the 
old days at School and he still seems to be worried about 
all the garbage cans that came down from the second floor 
— of course I knew nothing." 

■*#*** 

Captain Charlie Spencer ('38-'39) writes from Italy 
where he is with Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry 
Brigade, and thanks the School for cigarettes he received 
at Christmas. Congratulations on the birth of a son. 

* • • • • 

Captain C. M. Russel ('24-'28), who is serving on the 
continent, has seen Captain John Kerrigan ('29-'33). He 




SQUASH TEAM 
L to /?:— The Headmaster, P. M. Bird, P. C. Dobell, E. Howard (Cape), 
J. R. McMurnch, R. A. Hope, Mr. Lewis. 




JUNIOR HASKlilBALL THAM, 1945 
Back Row: — The Headmnster, E. A. R. Whitt-head, C. C. Mahaffy, C. Crowe, Mr. Gregoris. 
Front Ron'-.—]. S. Evans, J. S. Wismer, M. F. McDowell, R. L. Watts. 
Absent: — C. J. Scott. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 89 

mentions that the ravages of the German-instigated black 
market have been not only severe but wide-spread and 
that the liberation forces are finding it difficult to control 
the situation. 

:■:- * '/: ^ * 

Lieut. Archie Jones ('35-'41), R.C.N.V.R., is stationed 
in H.M.C.S. "Timmins". While in Halifax he lunched with 
Sue Ketchum ('35-'37), Dave Morris ('30-'41) and Ian 
Stewart ('38-'44). He mentions having a game of squash 
with Wally Duggan ('37-'41) and Pete Armour ('38-'41). 
Others seen include John Irwin ('35-'38), Barry Hayes 
('40-'43), Ken Cheyney ('39-'41). Ken Scott ('40-'43), Gay 
Goodall ('40-'43), Larry Clarke ('40-'43) and Bim Waters 
('36-'39). It is regretted that we couldn't have the minutes 
of this Old Boys' Meeting! 

***** 

Lieut.-Cmdr. Fred Southam ('26-'32) has the good 
fortime to be stationed with two other Old Boys at Head- 
quarters, Canadian Naval Mission, Overseas. They are 
Lieut. Alex Bruce ('17-'19) and Lieut. Colin Brown ('27- 
'31). The former was in charge of the sixth and seventh 
Victory Loans for the Navy. 

*- * * * * 

Ord/Smn. Chuck Laing ('42-'44) is in H.M.C.S. Cor- 
vette "Lachute" on the St. John's - Londonderry run. F/O. 
Dewar Laing ('41-'42) has completed a tour in coastal com- 
mand. 

* * * # * 

Chaplain and Hon. Major C. H. Boulden informs us 
that he was at an Adjutant General's conference presided 
over by Brigadier W. N. Bostock ('19-'20). In the National 
Art Gallery he saw two excellent paintings by Captain 
LavsTen Harris ('26-'29), and he has had lunch with Major 
C. R. Archibald {'25-'27), Captain C. B. K. Kirk ('22-'30), 
Captain P. L. Cleveland ('26-'30). He has also visited 
Chaplain and Hon. Major F. A. Smith ('16-'20). 



90 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Lieutenant Charlie Seagram ('28-'36), 48th. High- 
landers, writes from the Italian front to say: "We have had 
rather a nasty time since April, what with the Hitler line, 
the Gothic line, and December which was as bad as any- 
thing we have had. Just lately the weather has been none 
too good. Rain, fog, snow, etc., is no joke for the boys 
in the slit trenches .... I am in charge of scouts and 
snipers and it can be a bit of a sticky job. We are situated 
in an Italian house, some of the lads living in the kitchen 
and some in the stable. Until yesterday I had been sleep- 
ing in the top story, but found it was quite imsafe from 
shelling, as Jerry got our range with an 88 S.P. He got 
no strikes on the building but landed three dandies in the 
courtyard and shattered every window in the house .... 
We are situated on a corner about 900 yards from Jerrj'. 
Just now a jeep went by and Jerry showered it with ma- 
chine gun fire. It is amazing how much is fired and how 
so few people get hurt". 

* * * * * 

Lieut. Pat Bankier ('29-'35) and Lieut. Bill Mickle 
('26-'32) have returned from overseas to No. 2 District 
Company, Toronto. Pat is an Army Examiner and Bill is 

going on course. 

***** 

BUI Cutten ('27-'34) arrived in Ottawa last October 
28 from India and Ceylon by way of England, and received 
his commission just after his return. Having completed a 
tour of operations he was offered his demobilization and 
was released on February 8. His present address is Ferris, 
Ontario. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Ql 

OLD BOYS' NOTES— II 

ANNUAL DINNER 

T.C.S. Old Boys' Association — Toronto Branch, Held at the 
Royal York Hotel, February 22, 1945 

In spite of some difficulty in finding a large gathering 
of Old Boys during wartime, the dinner this year was well 
attended; about eighty-five Old Boys were present, 

Mr. Ketchum was the first speaker of the evening, and 
he reviewed the record of Old Boys on Active Service, 
mentioning the distinctions that had been won by so many. 
He also outlined what the School was accomplishing this 
year, and some of the Old Boys were quite surprised at the 
number of boys in attendance. Mr. Ketchum also told 
some amusing stories concerning one or two Masters who 
have left the School and are now on Active Service. When 
he mentioned how many scholarships Arthur Millward had 
won at the University of Toronto last June, there was a 
great deal of applause. 

Dr. Corbett, guest speaker of the evening, gave those 
present an idea of the rehabilitation programme that 
Canada is to have for her returned men. Dr. Corbett' s 
words were of special interest to all Old Boys with sons 
on Active Service. 

The new slates of officers for the Central Association 
and for the Toronto Branch were announced, and Mr. Ket- 
chum said a few words of thanks to Lieut. -Col. J. Ewart 
Osborne for his splendid work for the Old Boys and the 
School during his term of office as President of the Central 
Association. 

The dinner was adjourned at 10:30 p.m. Those pre- 
sent included: Stu Armour, Dr. R. G. Armour, A. Adam- 
son, A. H. Brown, Pete Britton, Walter Biton, Pat Bankier, 
C. D. Burland, Martin Baldwin, Cyril Capreol, Bobby Cas- 
sels, Glenn Curtis, R. C. H. Cassels, D. E. Cumberland, 
H. L. Chappell. E. S. Clarke, Dr. Corbett. Peter Campbell, 



92 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

George Crum, G. C. Dewar, H. M. Dignam, Eric Elliott, 
G. K. Fisken, R. T. Fulford, G. T. Fulford, Bill Greer, 
P. B. Greey, D. C. Greey, John Holton, L. G. Hare, David 
Higginbotham, Strachan Ince, Gordon Ince, Fred Johnson, 
N. E. Kelk, P. A. C. Ketchiim, Jim Kerr, G. D. Kirkpatrick, 
J. H. Lithgow, C. R. Lloyd, P. J. B. Lash, J. W. Langmuir, 
Dick LeSueur, K. M. Langmuir, John MacLaren, L. R. Mc- 
Murray, A. D. McLean, F. S. Merry, R. L. Merry, G. M. 
Mudge, J. G. Matthews, Arthur Millward, E. Marvin, Dick 
Mackie, T. D. McGaw, D. C. Mickle, J. E. Osborne, G. S. 
Osier, Dr. C. D. Parfitt, W. M. Pearce, G. D. Perry. A. G. 
Ramsay, L. M. Rathbun, Jack Ryrie, Dr. F. W. Rolph, 
G. Smith, Syd. Saunders, Harry Symons, J. W. Seagram, 
G. E. Spragge, Gamey Stratton, G. B. Strathy, Don Saun- 
derson, C. W. Shadbolt, C. E. Sinclair, C. A. Snowdon, 
Jack Thompson, H. S. Thorne, H. B. Tett, A. A. Harcourt 
Vernon, C. H. Wotherspoon, W. W. Walker, General A. V. 
S. Williams, R. F. Yates, E. A. Hethrington, H. A. Cooper, 
J. T. Band. 



GENERAL MEETING— T.C.S. O.B.A. 

The meeting this year was held at the Toronto Club 
on February 22, and was a joint meeting of the Central 
Association and Toronto Branch. Lieut.-Col. J. Ewart 
Osborne, D.S.O., was in the chair and the Recording Secre- 
tary was J. W. Kerr. 

The finances of both branches were reviewed and 
approved. The new slate of officers is as follows: 

Central Association 

Honorary President — P. A. C. Ketchum. 
President — Major Strachan Ince. 
Vice-Presidents — P. A. DuMoulin (London) 

Greville Hampson (Montreal) 
Secretary-Treasurer — W. K. Molson (Port Hope). 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 93 

Toronto Branch 

Past President — Strachan Ince. 
President — Syd. Saunders. 
Vice-President — Jack Thompson. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Jim Kerr. 

Members — Stu Osier, Bill Seagram, George Hees, Norm 
Kelk. Harry Symons. 
It was agreed by both bodies that a more active par- 
ticipation was necessary on the part of Old Boys in the 
affairs of the School. 



H&rry (Chicken) Fowlds ('23-'28) is Reeve of Camp- 
bellford and very kindly entertained the hockey team after 
the game in Campbellford on March 5. 

***** 

George Crum ('38-'42) gave a piano recital Monday 
evening, March 5, at the Arts and Letters Club, Toronto. 

* * * • • 

Mark Balfour ('41-'44) is attending Millfield School. 
Somerset, England, and is working for his School Certi- 
ficate. He has applied for the University short course but 
is expecting his call from the Navy in April. 



BIRTHS 

Armstrong — On March 14, 1945, at the Kingston General 
Hospital, to Flight Lieutenant D. Hadley Armstrong, 
A.F.C. ('29-'37), R.C.A.F., and Mrs. Armstrong, a daugh- 
ter. 

Oassils — On November 30, 1944, to Captain Murray H. Cas- 
sils ('31-'34), the Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada, and 
Mrs. Cassils, a daughter. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 95 

Jemmett — On February 26, 1945, at the Toronto General 
Hospital, to A/Cmdr. D. E. ff. Jemmett ('26-'30), R.C.N. 
V.R., and Mrs. Jemmett, a daughter. 

Lyon — On February 27, 1945, at the Toronto General Hos- 
pital, to Mrs. Lyon, wife of the late Major Robert Plum- 
mer Lyon ('20-'26), 48th. Highlanders, a daughter. 

Spencer — On January 24, 1945, at Bowmanville Hospital, 
to Captain Charles H. A. Spencer ('38-'39), the Irish 
Regt. of Canada, and Mrs. Spencer, a son. 



WHAT DO YOU PLAN TO BE 

AN 



EXECUTIVE S^ ^ 




THE job has its points ... a carpeted office, 
buzzers to push, business trips (expenses paid), 
personal secretaries, dictaphones .... 

But while preparing for the upholstered seat 
and all that goes with it, get the habit of 
organizing your own affairs. Start by balancing 
your own personal budget. Spend no more . . . 
and preferably less ... than you receive, and 
put small savings away faithfully as a "reserve 
fund" against future needs. That's smart busi- 
ness practice, and good training for anyone no 
matter what his future calling may be. Open 
your own savings account at our nearest 
branch. We welcome it. 

THE ROYAL BANK 

OF CANADA 



Corporation of 
Trinity College School 

VISITOR: 
His Grace the Archbishop of Toronto and Priiiatb op All Canada. 
GOVERNING BODY 
Ex-Offiao Members 

The Chancellor of Trinity University. 

The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College. 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., B.Pabd., Headmaster. 

Elected Members 

The Hon. Mr. Justice R. M. Dennistoun, C.B.E., V.D., B.A., LL.D Winnipeg 

Robert P. Jellett, Esq Montreal 

G. B. Strathy, Esq., K.C., M.A •. Toronto 

Norman Seagram, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. Senator G. H. Barnard, K.C Victoria, B.C. 

CoL J. W. Langmuir, M.B.E., V.D Toronto 

Capt. Cohn M. Russell Montreal 

J. H. Lithgow, Esq Toronto 

A. E. Jukes, Esq Vancouver, B.C. 

Col. H. C. Osborne, C.M.G., C.B.E., V.D., MA. Ottawa 

Hugh F. Labatt, Esq London, Ont. 

F. G. Mathers, Esq., B.A., LL.B Winnipeg 

Major B. M. Osier Toronto 

J. Bruce Mackmnon, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. R. C. Matthews, P.C, B.A Toronto 

Wing Commander Charles Bums Toronto 

The Right Rev. R. J. Renison, M.A., D.D Iroquois Falls, Ont. 

Admiral Percy W. Nelles, CJB., R.C.N Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. J. Ewart Osborne, D.S.O., V.D,, B.Sc Toronto 

Air Marshal W. A. Bishop, V.C, C.B,, D.S.O., M.C., DiJ-C, LL.D Ottawa 

Lieut.-CoL Gerald W. Birks, O.B.E Montreal 

J. D. Johnson, Esq Montreal 

Major W. M. Pearce, M.C Toronto 

G. Meredith Huycke, Esq., K.C, BA Toronto 

S. S. DuMoulin, Esq Hamilton 

Argue Martin, Esq., K.C Hamilton 

T. W. Seagram, Esq Waterloo, Ont. 

Gerald Larkin, Esq Toronto 

R. V. LeSueur, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

Wilder G. Penfield, C.M.G., M.D., D.S.C., D.Ci., FJtS., FJLCS,. . . .Montreal 

Captain Strachan Ince, D.S.C Toronto 

G S. Osier, Esq Toronto 

Appointed by Trinity College 
The Hon. Mr. Justice P. H. Gordon, C.B.E., K.C, MA., LL.D., B.CL. 
Elected by the Old Boys 

P. A. EXiMoulin, Esq London, Ont. 

Capt. P. G. Campbell, M.C Toronto 

Major H. L. Symons, E.D Toronto 



Trinity College School. Port Hope, Ont. 

FOUNDED 1865 

Head Master 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge; BA., Trinity 

College, Toronto; B.Paed., Toronto. St. Mark's School, Southborough, 

,Mass., 1929-1933. (1933) 

House Masters 
C. Scott, Esq., London University. (Formerly Headmaster of King's College 

School, Windsor). (1934) 
R. G. S. Maibr, Esq., B.A., Harvard; University of Paris; Cornell University. (1936) 

Chaplain 
The Rev. E. R. Bagley, M.A., St. Peter's Hall, Oxford; Ridley Hall, Cambridge. 
(1944). 

Assistant Masters 

Col. H. V. de Bury, C.B.E., Royal Military College, Kingston, 1905-10; Stoney- 

hurst College, England. (1943) 

F. P. Gregoris, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; University of London; Univenity 

of Rome; B.Ph.; Ph.L. (1943) 

G. R. GwYNNE-TiMOTHY, EsQ., B.A., Jesus College, Oxford. (1944). 

G. A. Hill, Esq., B.A., University College, Toronto; Ontario College of Education. 

(1942) 
A. B. Hodgetts, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto; University of Wisconsin. 

(1942) 
A. B. Key, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; Ontario College of Education. (1943) 
P. H. Lewis, Esq., M.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. (1922) 
W. K. Molson, Esq., B.A., McGiU University. (Jan. 1942) 
A. C. Morris, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N.S. (1921) 
A. H. N. Snelgrove, Esq., Mount Allison University. (1942) 
R. Thompson, Esq., M.A., St. Catherine's College, Cambridge; Santander. (1942) 
A. E. White, Esq., M.A., McMaster University. (Jan. 1945). 

Tutor 
Lieut.-Col. K. L. Stevenson, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. (1930) 

Visiting Masters 

Edmund Cohu, Esq Music 

S J. DoLiN, Esq., Mus. Bac Music 

J. W. Kerr, Esq Basketball, Track 

j. W. Wilson Cricket 

Physical Instructor for both Schools 
Captain S. J. Bait, Royal Fusiliers; formerly Physical Instruaor at R.M.C., 
Kingston, Ontario. (1921) 

THE JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Principal 

C. J. Tottenham, Esq., B.A.. Queen's University, Kingston. (1937) 

A ssistant Masters 
H. G. James, Esq., Leeds University. (1922). 

J. D. Burns, Esq., University of Toronto, Normal School, Toronto. (1943). 
Mrs. Cecil Moore, Normal School, Peterborough. (1942). 

D. W. Morris, Esq., Normal School, London. (1944). 

H. C. Swallow, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto. (1944). 



Bursar G. C. Temple, Esq. 

Physician R. McDerment, Esq., M.D 

Nurse Miss Rhea Pick, R.N. 

Dietitian Mrs. J. F. Wilkin 

Matron (Senior School) Mrs. G. R. Gwynne-Timothy 

Nurse-Matron (Junior School) Mrs. G. Sturgeon, R.N. 

Dietitian (Junior School) Mrs. D. M. Crowe 

Secretary Miss E. M. Gregory 



SCHOOL DIRECTORY 

PREFECTS 

E. J. M. Huycke (Head Prefect), P. C. Dobell, H. C. D. Cox, J. M. Irwin, 

E. Howard, H, French, E. McC. Sinclair. 

SENIORS 

T. McC. Wade, J. R. McMurrich, H. C. Butterfield, G. P. Vernon, 

G. A. H. Pearson, D. A. Davidson, G. C. Bovaird, J. N. Matthews, 

J. K. P. Allen, D. A. Decker, D. H. Wilson. 

HOUSE OFFICERS 
W. G. Phippen, P. L. Gilbert, V. Dawson, R. V. S. Smith, W. G. McDougall. 
D. H. Roenisch, R. A. Hope, R. C. Paterson, R. M. Kirkpatrick, P. C. Stratford, 

F. A. H. Greenwood, J. G. Gibson, S. C. Edmonds, P. A. Richardson, 

G. N. M. Currie, E. E. Gibson, W. C. Long, J. C. Barber, P. M. Bird, 

W. J. A. Toole, J. R. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle, F. J. Main. 

SCHOOL COUNCIL 
The Headmaster, 3 Prefects 
VI Scholarship — Pearson i (French i) VC — Hardaker. 

VIA— Vernon (Sinclair) IVA (1)— French ii (McDowell) 

VIB— Howard (Hope) IVA (2)— McPherson (Jarvis) 

VA — Greenwood (McDougall) IVB — Fennell (Wismer) 

VB— aCrady (Crowe) IIIA— Hall (Rogers) 

IIIB— Spencer (Pilcher) 

CHAPEL 

Head Sacristan — J. G. Gordon 

Sacristans 

I. B. Campbell, G. R. Campbell, W. A. Curtis, V. Dawson, H. A. Hyde, 

J. M. Hallward, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, R. W. S. Robertson, 

D. H. Roenisch, T. McC. Wade, R. L. Watts. 

CRICKET TRACK 

Captain— U. C. D. Cox. Captain— 'P. C. Dobell. 

Vice-Captain — E. Howard. 

SWIMMING GYM. 

Captain — E. J. M. Huycke. Captain — D. M. O'Grady. 

Vice-Captain — E. McC. Sinclair. Vice-Captain — J. G. Gibson. 

THE LIBRARY 

Librarian — G. D. White; Assistant — H. A. Lamb 

Camepe Room — ^J. R. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle 

Used Book Room— I. B. Campbell, R. W, S. Robertson 

Lights Boys — H. P. Goodbody, P. L. Goering, R. M. Merry 



Trinity College School Record 



VOL. 48, NO. 5. JUNE, 1945. 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Active Service List 

Editorials 1 

Chapel Notes — 

Confirmation Service 6 

School Notes — 

Mr. Wilson 10 

Red Cross Collection 10 

The School Dance 11 

Architecture as a Career 13 

V-E Day 14 

Amateur Hour 14 

Inspection Day • 15 

Visit of Dr. Griffith 17 

School Debate — 

Peacetime Military Training 18 

Brief Biographies 20 

Contributions — 

"One Crowded Hour . . . . " 26 

Impressions of the Dam 27 

Do You Remember? 29 

Moose Talk 30 

A Monument to Man 32 

The Trees Still Stand 33 

Off the Record— 

The Courtship of Faded Lily 34 

Hockey — 

Impressions of the Season 36 

Hockey Finals 38 

Scoring Analysis 41 

Cricket- 
Editorial 42 

Little Big Four Swimming Meet 43 

Annual Boxing Compedtion 45 

Gym. Competitions 47 

Squash Tournaments 48 

Colours 48 

The Junior School Record 50 

Old Boys' Notes — 

On Aaive Service 60 

Old Boys' Notes II 75 

Births, Marriages, Deaths 76 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Apr. 9 School Dance. 

11 Trinity Term begins. 

22 Church Parade to St. John's. 

27 Debate with U.T.S., at Port Hope. 

May 1 Founder's Day: 80th Birthday of the School. 
3-4 Entrance and Scholarship Examinations. 

5 Inter-School Gym. Meet, in Toronto. 

7 War in Europe ends. 

8 Victory Day: Whole holiday. 

12 Inspection of Cadet Corps: Col. the Hon. Colin 

Gibson, K.C., M.C., V.D., Minister of National 
Defence for Air. 

13 The Rev. E. M. Dann speaks in Chapel. 

14 UpperSchool Test Examinations begin. 

20 Whitsunday: Dr. H. C. Griffith, Headmaster of 
Ridley, speaks in Chapel. 

23 Inter-School Track Meet, at U.C.C. 

24 Empire Day: Whole holiday. 

26 First XI. vs. Toronto Cricket Club, at Port Hope. 

27 Trinity Sunday: Annual Memorial Service; the 

Rev. F. H. Cosgrave, M.A., D.D., Provost of 
Trinity College, Toronto. 

28 Hockey Dinner. 

30 First XI vs. U.C.C, in Toronto. 

31 Final School Examinations begin. 

June 1 Sports Day. 

2 First XI vs. Ridley, at Toronto Cricket Club. 

3 Archdeacon F. H. Sawers speaks in Chapel. 

6 First XI vs. S.A.C., at Toronto Cricket Club. 

8 Athletic Prize Giving, 7 p.m. 

9 Speech Day: The Right Rev. R. J. Renison ('89- 

'92), M.A., D.D., Lord Bishop of Moosonee. 

15 Upper School Departmental Examinations begin. 
22 Annual Leaving Dinner. 

Sept. 11 Michaelmas Term begins for New Boys, 6 p.m. 
12 Supplemental Examinations begin at 8.30 a.m. 
12 Michaelmas Term begins at 6 p.m. 



Prayer in Use in the Chapel for Old Boys 
on Active Service 

O Almighty God, who art wiser than the 
children of men and overrulest all things to their 
good, hold, we beseech Thee, in Thy keeping all 
who have gone forth to battle for our cause, 
especially those from this School: watch over 
those that are missing: comfort and protect those 
in the hands of the enemy. Be with them in the 
hour of danger, strengthen them in the hour of 
weakness, sustain and comfort them in the hour 
of sickness or of death. Grant that they may be 
true to their calling and true always to Thee, 
and make both them and us to be strong to do our 
duty in Thy service, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. 

ACTIVE SERVICE LIST 

Additions, Promotions and Corrections, June, 1945. 

1925-26 AHEARN, T. T., F/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1936-39 ALEXANDER, T. L., M.B.E., Capt., Algonquin 

Regt. (freed P.O.W.). 
1929-33 AMBROSE, D. R., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1921-23 ARCHIBALD, B. M., O.B.E., D.S.O., Brigadier, 

R.E. 
1928-31 ARCHIBALD, T. D., Captain, R.C.A. (freed 

P.O.W.). 
1938-40 ARMOUR, D. E. P., Capt., R.C.A. 
1941-45 AUSTIN, J. B., Pte., Infantry. 
1930-33 BAILLIE, J. F., Major, the Black Watch (R. 

H.R.) of Canada. 
1929-35 BANKIER, P. D., Capt., R.C.A. 
1922-27 BALFOUR. St. C, Cmdr., R.C.N. 
1930-31 BARNES, R. E., Capt., R.C.A. 
1938-42 BARNETT. J. W.. P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1936-39 BEST. G. H., Lieut, R.C.E. 
1941-43 BLACK. E. P.. A.B.. R.C.N.V.R. 
1919-26 BOONE. G. L., M.B.E., E.D., Lieut.-Col.. 48th 

Highlanders of Canada. 
1941-44 BOVEY, C. A. Q.. Pte., C.A.T.C. 



1941-43 BROOKS, D. A., A/PO, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 
+1940-43 BUTLER, J. D., Tpr., Armoured Corps (Killed 

in Action). 
+1928-31 BYERS, A. G., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing. Pre- 
sumed Killed on Active Service). 
1922-27 CAMPBELL, J. D. C, Major, R.C.O.C. 
1942-44 CAWLEY, M. A., Gnr., R.C.A. 
1931-34 CHADWICK, W. S., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 
1940-42 CHARTERS, A. H., L/Cpl., Royal Regt. of 

Canada. 
1940-42 CHIPMAN, W. N. A., Pte., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1929-33 CLEVELAND, J. B., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

(demob.). 
1911-13 COOK, T. R., Major, Canadian Forestry Corps 
(S.O.S.). 
+1921-27 CROLL, I. B., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 
1938-41 DALTON, W. B., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1937-42 DAVIDSON, I. J., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N. 
1936-41 DIGNAM, H. R., F/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
Master DIXON, G. H., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1940-43 DODD, J. H. B., F/0, R.A.F. 
1927-32 DOOLITTLE, J. R., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1921-25 DuMOULIN, R. T., Major, R.C.A. 
+ 1940-42 DUNCAN, J. A. C, Lieut., Grenadier Guards 
(Killed in Action). 
1927-31 DYKES, C. P. J., Lieut, R.C.E. 
1934-39 EARLE, G. A. P., P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1938-39 FULLERTON, H. D., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1937-38 GARBUTT, D. F. B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1920-21 GARDINER, A. T., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 
1939-42 GIBBONS, M. A., Lieut., B.M.I. 
+1925-30 GIBSON, M. W., S/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 
1942-45 GILLAN, C. A. W., Pte., Infantry. 
1920-26 GLASSCO, C. S., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
Master GLOVER, R. G., A/Capt., Intelligence. 
1940-43 GOODALL, R. G. W., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
+1930-32 GRANT, J. R., S/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 



1940-45 GREIG, J. G., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1914-15 HALE, J. J., Capt, R.C.A. (demob.). 

1936-39 HAMPSON, H. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. (demob.). 

1936-38 HART, M. C., Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

1913-18 HAULTAIN, C. F., E.D., Capt., Midland Regt. 
(demob.). 

1930-36 HENDERSON, H. L., A/Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 
V.R. 

1917-18 HENDERSON, I. S., Lieut., R.C.A. (S.O.S.) 

1937-42 HIGGINS, L. T., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1925-31 HOLMES, J., P.O., R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-31 HOWARD, P. P., S/Sergt., U.S. Marine Corps. 

1927-29 INGLIS, R. S., Capt., R.C.A. 

1933-39 JOHNSON, R. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. (freed P. 
O.W.). 

1939-42 KEEFLER, D. I. M., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1939-40 KEEGAN, D. M., A/LA, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1938-41 KERRY, C. W., Bdr., R.C.A. 

1928-31 KING, T. B., Lieut., Kent Regt. (freed P.O.W.). 

1920-25 KINGSMILL, N., Lieut.-Col., 13th Inf. Bde. 

1933-35 KLINE, J. E., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1930-35 LANGDALE, A. H.. S/Sergt., R.C.E.M.E. 

1899-04 LAWSON, H. O., Colonel, R.C.A.S.C. (retired). 

1919-21 LAZIER, H. D. F., Major, R.H.L.I. (freed P. 
O.W.). 
tl924-25 LEA. S. A. W.. Flight Sergt., R.C.A.F. (Miss- 
ing, Presumed Killed in Action). 

1923-26 LEGGAT, M. H., Pte., Seaforth Highlanders 
(S.O.S.) . 

1938-41 LEWIN, F. S., Cpl.. R.C.A.S.C. (demobilized). 

1934-38 LITHGOW, C. H., Major, Royal Canadian Regt. 

1934-36 LUCAS, G. T., Capt.. R.C.A. 

1915-20 MACKINTOSH. D. C, Lieut.-Cmdr.. R.C.N.V.R. 

1931-35 MARTIN. E. D. K., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1940-42 MATHERS. W. G.. A/LA. R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 

1927-28 MAUGHAN, A. H.. Capt., Canadian Grenadier 
Guards (S.O.S.). 
tl937-40 McAVITY, H. K.. F/L. R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 

1934-46 McBRIDE. R. F.. F/L. R.C.A.F. (freed P.O.W.). 



1917-18 McCarthy. D., Major, R.C.A. (freed P.O.W.). 

1927-31 McCREA, A. E., Sergt.. R.C.A.F. 

1931-36 McFARLANE, P. A., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
(demobilized). 

1942-45 McINTYRE, P. H., Pte., Infantry. 
1 1928-34 McLAREN, R. D., D.F.C., S/L, R.A.F. (Missing, 
Presumed Killed in Action). 

1926-32 MICKLE, W. J., Lieut., 

1942-44 MILLHOLLAND, A. S., S i/c (SoM), U.S.N.R. 
tl937-42 MOORE, A. B., Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. 
(Missing, Presumed Killed in Action). 

1933-44 MORRIS, R. T., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1930-41 MORRIS, W. D., Sub-Lieut. (S), R.C.N. 

1938-43 MURRAY, I. G., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1940-43 NESBITT, A. M., Coder, R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-31 NEVILLE, D. H., Capt., U.S. Army. 

1929-33 NEWMAN, H. J. R., Capt., The Royal Regt. of 
Canada. 

1926-34 OSLER, P. C, Lieut., P.P.C.L.I. (freed P.O. 
W.). 

1941-43 PATERSON, J. A., Cadet, R.C.N, (demob.). 

1941-43 PHIPPEN, J. G., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1930-34 PINCOTT, S. W. F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1928-29 POPHAM, J. R., Major, the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada (demob.). 

1915-18 PREWER, V. H., Major, Armoured Corps. 

1930-32 PRICE, A. S., Major, R.C.A. 

1929- PRICE, H. E. C, M.B.E., Major, Royal Cana- 
dian Regt. 

1937-39 RE A, J. K., Lieut., Infantry Corps. 

1927-33 REED, L. M. K., Major, Infantry Corps. 

1930-34 REID, W. B., Lieut., 48th Highlanders of Can- 
ada (freed P.O.W.). 

1926-29 RENISON, R. J. B., F/L, R.A.F. (freed P. 
O.W.). 

1942-45 ROBARTS, G. L., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1923-26 ROBERTS, J. P., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1943-45 ROBSON, P. C, Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-32 ROGERS, W. F. B., Lieut, Irish Regt. (S.O.S.). 

1927-31 ROPER, P. K., F/L, R.C.A.F. (freed P.O.W.). 



1943-44 ROSE, J. F., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1924-28 RUSSEL, C. M., Major, R.C.A. 

1937-42 RUSSELL, D. K., P/O, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1929-32 RYERSON, Y. E. S., Lieut., Royal Regt. of 

Canada (freed P.O.W.). 
1941-43 SAVAGE, R. W., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
1940-43 SCOTT. K. A. C, Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1913-14 SHARP, J. McA., E.D., Major, H.Q., 1st Can. 

Division. 
1942-43 SHORT, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1940-42 SIMPSON, F. J. H. 

1921-24 SLATER, N. D., Croix de Guerre, Capt., R.C.A. 
1941-44 SMYTHE, J. S., Pte., Algonquin Regt. 
1927-32 SOMERS, D. C, Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. (S.O.S.) 
1919-20 SOMERS, G. T., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1906-11 SPRAGGE, G. W., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.) . 
1927-33 STIKEMAN, W. J. C, M.B.E., Lieut.-Col., the 

Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1939-42 SUTHERLAND, J. B. I., 2nd. Lieut., the Black 

Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1926-32 TAYLOR, T. L., Lieut.. Royal Regt. of Canada 

(freed P.O.W.). 
1940-42 THOMPSON, J. C, Cadet. C.P.T.C. 
1922-24 TROW. A. M., Capt, Q.O.R.C. 
1933-38 VIPOND, J. R., Lieut., Irish Regt. (freed P. 

O.W.). 
1928-34 WALDIE, I. S., Capt.. Q.O.R.C. 
1941-42 WALKER. J. M.. Cpl.. Infantry Corps. 
1937-42 WATERS, J. G., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N. 
1937-38 WESTELL, R. L., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1 1931-33 WHITE, W. L. C, Capt., Regma Rifles of Can. 

(Killed in Action). 
1929-34 WIGLE. D. H., Group Capt.. R.C.A.F. 
tl929-32 WIGLE. F. E., O.B.E., D.S.O., Lieut. -Colonel, 

Armoured Corps (Killed in Action). 
1927-31 WILLIAMS, R. S., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
1936-39 WILSON. J. W., Lieut., C.M.G.T.C. 
Master WYNN, C. N., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.N.V.R. 



Trinity College School Record 

Vol. 48 Trinhy College School, Port Hope, June, 1945 No. 5 

Editor-in-Chief p. C. Dobell 

News Editor S. C. Edmonds 

Literary Editor G. P. Vernon 

Sports Editor E. McC. Sinclair 

Feature Editor T. McC. Wade 

Business Manager R. C. Paterson 

Assistants H. French, J. B. French, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, 

A. M. Stewart, H. C, Butterfield, J. H. Caldbick, V. Dawson, W. M. 
Dobell, J. W. Dobson, D. A. Decker, J. W. Dumford, F. A. H. Green- 
wood, J. G. Gordon, J. M. Hallward, R. M. Kirkpatrick, T. W. Lawson, 
J. R. Ligertwood, J. D. McDonough, M. F. McDowell, W. H. Palmer 
G. A. H. Pearson. R. W. S. Robertson, R. V. S. Smith, R. L. Watts. 

Photography G. C. Bovaird, R. P. Stokes 

Junior School Record Mr. C. J. Tottenham 

Managing Editor Mr. W. K. Molson 

Treasurer Mr. A. H. N. Snelgrove 



The Record is published six times a year, in the months of October, December, 
February, April, June and August. 



EDITORIALS 

We can hear the bells of peace ringing in our ears. 
We have fought a long, hard and costly battle, and we 
have won; but it has been an upward struggle all the 
way. We have ever had to shrug our shoulders at defeat 
and start again with renewed vigour to make up our losses. 
There have been many moments of great sorrow, of great 
tribulation and of great joy. War brings with it the ex- 
tremes of passion. Yet none of our losses has been so 
great as the recent death of President Roosevelt; nor could 
our enemies have gained a greater victory. 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was a man feared by the 
enemy, yet revered by the Allied Nations. In his twelve 
years as President of the United States he had made many 
friends, shown himself to be a wise and honourable states- 
man and a great leader. His name will take its place beside 



2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

those of Washington and Lincoln as one of the great Presi- 
dents of the United States. 

We cannot but regret his untimely death ; we can, how- 
ever, rejoice for two reasons. He died without suffering, 
passing away in the full possession of his great faculties. 
There was no slackening off of his abilities, no abatement 
of his dynamic powers. He worked until the end for his 
country and for the world, offering himself, we might even 
say, as a sacrifice to the attainment of "peace on earth, 
goodwill towards men". And he died with victory in sight 
and with peace in the air. All his efforts had not been in 
vain and all his hopes had not been without foundation. 
Like Moses, he was only to see the "promised land", while 
we might benefit of his labours. And with Nelson, when 
he was told of victory at Trafalgar, he might murmur, 
"Thank God, I have done my duty". 

— P.C.D. 



An important proposal was advanced at a recent meet- 
ing of the Editors of the Little Big Four magazines. Re- 
presentatives from Upper Canada College, Saint Andrew's 
College and Trinity College School attended ; unfortunately, 
members of Bishop Ridley College were unable to be pre- 
sent. The proposal, stemming from a desire to promote 
unity amongst the schools, concerned the creation of a 
Little Big Four magazine. We feel this suggestion merits 
the consideration of Old Boys and present students alike. 

It should first be emphasized that the magazine is still 
in the discussion stage and that no decisions have been 
reached. A tentative constitution has been drawn up, how- 
ever, in order to clarify the proposals advanced. 

The plan is that this Little Big Four Magazine be pub- 
lished once a year, in April, and that the Editorial board 
comprise eight members, two from each School, with one 
member being elected Acting Editor-in-Chief. The maga- 
zine would be divided into four sections, School News, Con- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 3 

tributions and Photographs, Sports and Miscellaneous. The 
last section might contain comparisons of Prefect Systems, 
letters from the Headmasters, details on organization of 
sports, and other articles which would be not only in- 
teresting but of mutual benefit. Each department would 
be delegated to one School for preparation. 

School News would consist of a synthesis of important 
School events, such as Inspections, Prize Givings and 
School Dances. Contributions and photographs would be 
selected from the best items appearing in the four existing 
magazines. This would be an added incentive for boys to 
do good work. Sports News would consist almost entirely 
of Little Big Four affairs. All Little Big Four games would 
be published, the reporting being done bj^ a third School to 
ensure impartiality; otherwise, a synthesis of the already 
published versions of both Schools would be made. The 
Sports Editors would meet annually to choose the All-Star 
Football Team, and individual pictures of players might 
appear in the magazine. To avoid undue feeling, it was 
considered wise to make only brief comment of those sports 
not under Little Big Four sponsorship. 

It is suggested that the magazine be kept entirely 
separate from the individual School magazme. It would, 
it is hoped, be entirely self-supporting, relying on a very 
small yearly subscription from each boy. If possible, ad- 
vertising would be omitted. 

Certain objections to such a magazine appear to con- 
demn it at first glance; in fact, we immediately ask our- 
selves — What purpose will it serve? What interest will it 
hold? Its foremost purpose, it seems, would be to increase 
Little Big Four unity. We may consider this step ad- 
vantageous or we may not. In any case, the four Schools 
included under this term are, in our opinion, the largest 
and most outstanding private schools in the province. 
Their backgrounds are comparable, their aims are the 
same, their legacy is similar. It appears possible that such 
a magazine could do much to give emphasis to the finest 



4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

features of each institution so that the others might bene- 
fit from them and, hence, be in a position to give the stu- 
dents a better education. A magazine of this nature could 
go far in making the Little Big Four Schools even better 
known as a body in the province. There is also a feeling, 
prevalent in some quarters, that more sports ought to be 
on a competitive basis in the Little Big Four. The pro- 
posed magazine might be a means of promoting this desire. 

In further considering the question, what interest 
would the magazine hold? Several arguments suggest 
themselves. Some would maintain that all the news would 
have appeared earlier in the respective Schools' magazines; 
more would feel that the boys of one School would not be 
interested in the happenings of the three others. But, in 
reviewing the proposed contents, we discover that about 
three-fourths of the news would be entirely new, and all of 
it would be from a different view-point. Only the literary 
section would remain unchanged and none but those articles 
of sufficient quality to merit printing would be published. 
From observation, it also appears that boys are very in- 
terested in the happenings of the other Schools; if this 
feeling were fostered by the magazine, which would seem 
to be the natural result, a much closer spirit of friendship 
might be developed, a spirit which is unfortunately all too 
dormant at present. 

Since the matter is of considerable importance and one 
which ought to arouse much discussion, we should be much 
gratified if all our readers holding definite views on the 
matter would send us their arguments and opinions. In 
closing, we stress again that the magazine is still in the 
discussion stage, but we feel that the advantages are such 
as to warrant its consideration. 

— P.C.D. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




CHAPELIMNOTES 



Toward a Brighter Future 

On Sunday, March 18, Squadron Leader the Rev. H. 
N. Taylor, former T.C.S. Chaplain ('31-'41), and at present 
a chaplain in the R.C.A.F., preached the sermon. He re- 
minded us that we had reached Passion Sunday, the climax 
of Christ's suffering. What a chance padres have, he said, 
to view the suffering of war. It is their duty and privilege 
to write letters of consolation and to call upon the next of 
kin of missing men they have once known; consequently, 
they see at first hand a great deal of misery. 

But amidst all this terrible suffering we observe ahead 
what we hope to be the not-so-distant glimmer of final vic- 
tory and a lasting peace. But what, we were asked, will 
be the reward of victory? The men in the armed forces 
look forward to a rest — a relief from their tasks. But 
surely the reward for serving our country will be a greater 
capacity to serve! We are waging this dreadful struggle 
to prepare for a great destiny, the destiny of mankind, 
which is justice, peace and love. 

And so, Passiontide will live on until we win the final 
battle, the battle over the principles for which our Lord 
died. If we are true followers of Him, we will take up 
our crosses and follow. Christ breached the line; we must 
pour through the gap. 



Q TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Confirmation Service 

On the evening of Saturday, March 24, His Grace the 
Archbishop of Toronto, and Primate of All Canada, the 
Most Rev. Derwyn Owen, held the annual Confirmation 
Service in the School Chapel. Forty-one boys from the 
Senior and Junior Schools received the Laying on of Hands. 
Many visitors were present at this most impressive service, 
including the parents of a large number of candidates. 

In the address, His Grace began by explaining the 
purpose of religion. This was, he said, the same as that 
of the ligaments which bind the limbs of the body into one 
purposeful whole, and of the twine which secures the sheaf 
of wheat. In its function, the Archbishop defined religion 
as the cultivation of friendship with God, through such 
acts as helping a neighbour in his work. "No real educa- 
tion is possible without the habitual contemplation of 
greatness". This, he felt, is to be found in worship and 
prayer. 

In conclusion. His Grace was reminded of the epitaph 
of a distinguished but humble scholar. Joseph Scriven. 
Although he had shown considerable ability as a professor 
of literature, he left his native Ireland and accepted posi- 
tions as a hired hand on farms in the Rice Lake area. He 
often passed the School while visiting Port Hope, but he 
never thought to enter it. On his grave are inscribed the 
words of his best-known hymn, "O what a friend we have 
in Jesus". 

The following morning, on Palm Sunday, the con- 
firmees celebrated their First Communion. 

The order of the Confirmation service was as follows: 

Processional Hymn 398 — "Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones" 

Introit— "I Lift My Heart to Thee" 

Presentation of Candidates 

Preface and Scripture Passages 

Hymn 646— "Just as I am. Thine Own to Be" 

The Archbishop's address 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Questioning of Candidates 

Prayers 

Hymn 480— "Come Holy Ghost, Our Souls Inspire" 

Laying on of Hands 

The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — "God So Loved the World — Sir John Stainer 

Offertory Hymns: 554 — "Blest are the Pure in Heart" 

572, "O Jesu, I Have Promised" 

Collects and Blessing 

Recessional Hymn 427— "He Who Would Valiant Be" 



The Road to Emmaus 



On Sunday, April 15, the Chaplain used as his text the 
familiar story of the two Disciples who journeyed with 
Christ on the road to Emmaus shortly after our Lord's 
resurrection. Although Jesus expounded and explained 
the Scriptures to them, the Disciples failed to recognize 
Him until He broke the bread and blessed it as they dined 
together in the evening. The Chaplain pointed out that 
this episode, which may be found in the twenty-fourth 
chapter of the Gospel according to St. Luke, not only 
illustrates the unpreparedness of the Jews for the return 
of Christ, but also describes one of the small acts by which 
He manifested Himself to His people and at the same time 
proved Himself to be the Living God. 



Church Parade 



On Sunday, April 22, the Cadet Corps marched to St» 
John's Church to take part in the eleven o'clock Matins 
service. The Rector, the Rev. J. M. Crisall, preached the 
sermon, choosing his text from the tenth verse of the 
fourth chapter of Zachariah: "And who shall despise the 
day of little things?" After several references to parables 
in the New Testament, the Rector applied his text to the 



8 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Eighth Victory Loan. He pointed out that although we 
are apt to depreciate our own individual contributions, it 
is a total of small investments that will go to make up the 
gigantic sum that is our goal. 

It had been originally planned to join other cadet 
corps in the Eighth Victory Loan parade after the service, 
but this part of the programme was postponed due to 
rainy weather. 



Christianity in School 

On Sunday, April 29, the Chaplain preached on the 
qualities that make T.C.S. the School it is. He explained 
that living as we do in such close contact with one another, 
we either help or hinder the common aim. In time, we are 
forced to realize our obligations and to adopt a spirit of 
co-operation. But, continued the Chaplain, we are com- 
manded to "Love the Lord thy God". To carry out this 
order, we must strive for all the better elements in life, 
such as truth and beauty. That is why, at T.C.S. , we make 
a special effort to absorb the teachings of ancient civiliza- 
tions and to develop a sense of perspective. But it is im- 
perative also that we round out our characters by growing 
in the knowledge of Christ's teachings and in the ability 
to worship as we should. Combine these qualities with 
Christian fellowship and we discover that ours is no ordi- 
nary opportunity, ours no ordinary School. 



Words Enforced Through Action 

On Sunday, May 12. the School welcomed back the 
Rev. Eyre Dann. Chaplain at T.C.S. from September, 1942, 
to June, 1944. Beginning his sermon with a reference to 
the Service of Thanksgiving for Victory in Europe, which 
had been held in the morning, he went on to show how it 
differed from the story of the ten lepers healed by Christ. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 

Of the latter, only one returned to give thanks while the 
others, although grateful, just could not be bothered. 

We were reminded that words alone are insufficient, 
that words must be proven through action. Mr. Dann 
stressed that the noblest action of which one is capable is 
to devote oneself to the service of God, and that there is 
no higher calling than that of the Ministry. 



The Realities of Life 



On Sunday, May 20, Dr. H. C. Griffith, Headmaster of 
Bishop Ridley College, spoke at Evensong, selecting as his 
text: "Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, de- 
ceiving yourselves". This, he explained, meant that we 
should be men of action and reality. 

He then reviewed some of the realities of life, the first 
being that of the Church, the only sane solution to such 
universal ills as distrust, selfishness and cruelty. He ask- 
ed us to compare Christian actions with Christian teach- 
ings and to examine the reality of our own Christianity. 

The second reality, that of duty, is the one most likely 
to be overlooked or ignored, for it is all too easy to argue 
ourselves out of it. But a sense of duty is an absolute 
requisite of our daily lives if we are to maintain our self- 
respect. 

As the third reality. Dr. Griffith chose truth, because, 
since "Only righteousness exalts a nation", we must be 
honest in both public and private life. 

The fourth reality, of which we are reminded by the 
Memorial Cross, is the reality of sacrifice, particularly of 
our Old Boys and of others who have regarded their coun- 
try above all else. Dr. Griffith closed with the poem by 
Sir Cecil Spring Rice "I vow to thee my country", and re- 
minded us of the challenge extended to us by our Old Boys 
that we follow their examples of patriotism and Christian 
sacrifice. 



10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

^^"« 9cllOol » •" 



>- ^ /<*r/vv 



NOTtS h 




Half Holiday 

On Thursday, March 15, the School celebrated a half- 
holiday in honour of the birth of a daughter to Flight- 
Lieutenant and Mrs. D. H.("Stal") Armstrong ('29-'37)— 
and Mrs. Wilkin's first grandchild. 

F/L Armstrong was assistant gym. instructor at 
T.C.S. from 1938 to 1940, when he left us to join the R.C. 
A.F. 

The School extends its heartiest congratulations to 
both parents and grandmother, and we sincerely hope that 
F/L and Mrs. Armstrong will visit us in the near future. 



Return of Mr. Wilson 



The Cricket Team has been fortunate in having with 
them again, after an absence of four years, Mr. John Wil- 
son, late of the Royal Canadian Air Force and a veteran 
of twenty-eight flights over Germany. 

Mr. Wilson is certainly one of the better cricketers of 
Canada, and under his able guidance we are approaching 
the end of a successful season. 



Red Cross Collection 



Once again, the School has made its contribution to 
the annual Red Cross campaign. Since it was felt that 
last year's drive was a trifle overly successful, thereby re- 
stricting the size of the School's donations to other charit- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD H 

able organizations, the objective this time was lowered to 
five hundred dollars. The final results reached a total of 
$569.50, being distributed throughout the School as fol- 
lows: Bethune House $187.80, Brent House $157.00, Junior 
School $127.00, Staff $103.70. 



THE SCHOOL DANCE 



"Gibson, will you tell me the name of the solution, 
please". 

"I beg your pardon, Pat — Oh, I'm sorry, sir! The 
name? Oh yes, the name "Parvenir", isn't it, sir?" 

"Ye gods, boys, will you wake up! Davidson, the name 
of the solution?" 

"U-h-h-h — well, sir, it's like this. You take the test 
tube in one hand (RA-6082, RA-6082, RA-6082) and you 
magnetize the heat rays (66 Inglewood Drive, 66 Inglewood 
Drive) until Lloyd George calls his election (gee, she 
should have written by now!). Did you say something, 
sir?" 

Yes, the School Dance has again left its mark (I knew 
we should have had our pictures taken), and that mark 
seems to vary through the years in proportion to the suc- 
cess of the dance. Perhaps that explains the deepness (I 
wonder if she wants me to write back?) of the mark this 
year, for a couple of days around the middle of April went 
just about as perfectly as any two days will go around 
during the middle of April (or around the middle of any- 
thing else, for that matter). In other words the dance 
was a real success in spite of premature misgivings as to 
attendance (Oh, for Pete's sake, Pearson, stop worrying; 
you're supposed to be writmg up the dance!) 

About sixty girls rolled into town on the afternoon of 
the ninth and were duly escorted up to the J.S. and given 
a bed therein, while the loyal males heaved up boxes, suit- 
cases, dunnage bags and anything else that the fair damsels 
had conveniently brought along. 



12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Anjrway, whatever was inside said baggage seemed to 
help considerably, for at nine o'clock, sixty radiant-looking 
females tripped daintily out to their respective partners, 
which worthies were impatiently digging up the turf in the 
lawn outside, and gracefully offered their arms. From 
then on, festivities progressed in a truly gay fashion. The 
music was good, the decorations colourful, the atmosphere 
happy, the conversation enjoyable, and, in fact, everyone 
was thoroughly content. (Remember fellahs, I'm speak- 
ing for the majority. 

The weather on Tuesday, brought on by many fervent 
prayers, was the best it could have been. Farmers stared 
in alarm as they watched not only College boys besport- 
ing themselves around the barns, but also what looked like 
College girls! The beauties of the dam, the lake, various 
creeks and in fact all that is beautiful around Port Hope 
(O.K., O.K., but a lot of them hadn't been here before, you 
know!) were duly admired and dazed upon. 

Tuesday afternoon witnessed a tea dance in the Hall 
that seemed to satisfy everyone concerned. At least you 
couldn't walk all over her dress! (Well, I mean, — oh, 
figure it out for yourself!) The objects of all our affec- 
tions finally departed on the 8.10 train, and curiously 
enough, against all customary procedure and etiquette, 
three enterprising young men managed to unconsciously 
depart with them! Instinct triumphed in the majority of 
cases, however, and for a few seconds one might have com- 
pared the scene at the station to a beehive immediately 
after being punctured by a well-aimed missile. Talk about 
the evacuation of Dunkirk! 

And so, once more, another School Dance is written 
off. From beginning to end it was worth every minute 
spent preparing for it. In the latter connection we have 
especially to thank Mr. and Mrs. Ketchum, Mrs. Wilkin and 
her Staff, Mr. and Mrs. Tottenham, Mrs. Crowe, Mrs. 
Gwynne-Timothy, and all connected with the decorating, 
amongst whom Mr. Key, Stratford, Wigle. Ligertwood and 



TRINITY CX)LLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 

Stokes stood out. We thought the decorations, centering 
in the Hall around drawings of decorations won by Old 
Boys, and in the Cocoa-Room around "Dante's Inferno", 
more than usually worthy of praise this year. While we 
are in such a benevolent mood, let's show our appreciation 
by thanking the girls for coming. They sort of help to 
brighten up a dance, don't you think? 



Architecture As A Future Career 

On Friday night, May 4, about forty members of the 
Senior School gathered in the Carnegie Room to hear a 
lecture by Mr. Anthony Adamson of the School of Archi- 
tecture, University of Toronto. Mr. Adamson, who specia- 
lizes in town planning, outlined the nature of an architect's 
work, as well as its advantages and disadvantages. Archi- 
tecture, he said, is a highly skilled profession and requires 
five years of training at a recognized school, for entry to 
which mathematics, a faculty for organization, and an 
artistic sense are vital. On graduation, the architect is 
usually employed at a salary until he enters a practicing 
partnership. After the war, opportunities for architects 
should be very numerous, since Canada is now short of a 
million houses. 

At the conclusion of his address, Mr. Adamson answer- 
ed a number of questions concerning the possible location 
of the new Chapel, the trend towards modem design, and 
the possibilities of the newly developed materials. To 
illustrate the work of architecture students, he displayed a 
very interesting collection of blueprints, placards, and 
sketches. We are indebted to Mr. Adamson for an agree- 
able and instructive evening. 



14 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

V-E Day 

On Monday, May 7, the visit of Major and Mrs. H. E. 
Irwin ('26-'31) was in the process of being honoured by a 
half-holiday when, at 3 p.m., the tower-bell summoned the 
School to the grass tennis courts. The Headmaster then 
announced that the war in Europe had come to an end, and 
outlined the schedule to be followed during the remainder 
of that day and Tuesday. Huycke's proposal that three 
cheers be given for the soldiers, sailors and airmen of the 
Allied Nations, who had accomplished the long-awaited 
event, was readily approved by the assembled School, which 
then returned to games. A short Chapel service was held 
in the evening, followed by town leave. For two hours the 
Senior School celebrated victory in the streets of Port 
Hope, waving flags and marching behind the citizens' band, 
led by the Mayor and the Chief of Police. The evening 
closed around a great bonfire in the old orchard. 

Tuesday, May 8, officially V-E Day and a whole holi- 
day, began with a parade of the Cadet Corps to the Thanks- 
giving Service in the Town Hall Park. After lunch, the 
School carried on as usual, and in the evening an Amateur 
Hour took place in the Hall. 



Amateur Hour 



On Tuesday, May 8, the night of V-E day, an Amateur 
Hour was held m the Hall, Mr. Morris directing. The 
evening started with three competing pianists — Prower. 
Anderson and Wade — all voted equally entertaining by the 
School. The next item was a recitation by Mr. Scott which 
was greatly enjoyed by those present, especially as it en- 
couraged Mr. Molson to give us a rendition at the piano. 
This was followed by Pangman with "The Battle of Hast- 
ings" and "Albert and the Lion", and by Mr. Morris with 
some amusing stanzas on primary education. The dance 
band then proceeded to some rather lively numbers and 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 

finally gave way to Mr. Snelgrove's Pinafore Chorus. With 
Mr. Bagley singing the solos, the Chorus exposed them- 
selves for the first time to the favourable criticism — and 
even assistance — of the audience. Last on the programme 
came Hope, Wade, and a rather indefinable group of musi- 
cians and singers, who brought to a close an extremely en- 
joyable evening. 



INSPECTION DAY 



Despite the fact that it rained heavily during the 
morning of May 12, the day set for the Inspection cere- 
monies, it had cleared sufficiently by 2 p.m. so that it was 
possible to hold the parade. The officer taking the salute 
was Colonel the Hon. Colin Gibson, M.C., Minister of Na- 
tional Defence for Air, assisted by Air Vice-Marshal W. A. 
Curtis, C.B., D.S.C. & Bar and Air Vice-Marshal N. R. 
Anderson, C.B. Also included among the inspecting party 
were Colonel F. G. Malloch, M.C., V.D., Colonel A. T. Pater- 
son, D.S.O. & Bar, O.B.E., E.D., Commander H. R. Wade, 
R.C.N.V.R., and Major T. C. Holmes, District Cadet Officer. 

Military studies were first on the programme, and one 
by, one Signals, Map Reading, First Aid, Knots and Lashes, 
Aircraft Recognition, the Swift Training Rifle, the Bren 
Light-Machine Gun, and the H.E. 36 Hand Grenade classes 
were visited by Major Holmes, who later in the day ex- 
pressed his satisfaction at the progress which had been 
made in all divisions. 

Due to the downpour, it was decided to reverse the 
usual procedure and hold the Annual Gymnasium Exhibi- 
tion before lunch. The First Gym. Eight began by de- 
monstrating their abilities on the horizontal bar by means 
of a series of astonishing gyrations. But their skill was 
fully matched by that of the Gym. Twelve on the parallel 
bars, who executed a number of very difficult exercises 
seldom seen at the School. They were followed by the 
Junior School, to whose lot fell brain stimulating games. 



16 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

wall bars and beams and club swinging, and then by the 
Senior School horse team and P.T. classes. 

After the Gym. Show the Headmaster introduced the 
members of the inspecting party to the visitors and the 
assembled School, and then asked Colonel Gibson to say 
a few words. The Air Minister expressed the great plea- 
sure he felt in being able to inspect the Cadet Corps, and 
went on to tell how Captain Batt had been his Sergeant- 
Major during the last Great War and how they had later 
met again at R.M.C. The Gym. Show, he felt, was better 
balanced this year than those of former years which he 
had attended, and he extended his congratulations to the 
School upon their winning the Imperial Challenge Shield m 
shooting. After noting that T.C.S. was the first cadet 
corps in the Empire to be affiliated with an Air Force, 
Colonel Gibson pointed out that the R.C.A.F. has a record 
to be proud of, a record which includes the award of the 
Victoria Cross to a Coastal Command pilot serving off Ice- 
land. But, the speaker acknowledged, none has a greater 
right to speak of records than this School, with such a 
large proportion of its Old Boys on active service. In con- 
clusion, the Minister petitioned the Headmaster for a 
whole-holiday to commemorate the occasion. 

After a very sumptuous buffet luncheon in the Hall, 
for which Mrs. Wilkin deserves much credit since many 
more guests were present than had been anticipated, the 
Cadet Corps marched out for ceremonial drill. This was 
completed in due order and evidently much to the satisfac- 
tion of the spectators. The Corps then broke ranks and 
fell in again in preparation for the Inter-House Competi- 
tion. Bethune House was the first to be put through its 
paces and Brent followed shortly thereafter. Both Houses, 
it was felt, did extraordinarily well considering the state 
of the campus and the verj' poor weather in which they 
had been forced to practise during the preceding two weeks. 

The drill having ended, the Cadet Corps and the visit- 
ing officers were photographed. The Headmaster then in- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 

troduced Major Holmes, who was to pass verdict on the 
performances of the Houses and comment on the year's 
cadet trainmg. The District Cadet Officer was very gen- 
erous in his praise of the work done and the co-operation 
shown him by T.C.S. during his years of association with 
the School, and regretted the fact that he would no longer 
have occasion to be present at the annual Inspections since 
he had already accepted a new post. Major Holmes an- 
nounced that he had this year decided in favour of Bethune 
House and added that, while the Competition had been ex- 
tremely close, he had noticed three minor errors in the 
Brent House ranks. 

The final event of the day was the presentation by 
Colonel Gibson to the T.C.S. Cadet Corps of the King 
George V Cup, awarded to the Dominion of Canada foi' 
the highest aggregate, and held by the Cadet Corps with 
the highest aggregate in Canada. Also presented was the 
Duke of Devonshire Trophy for the best Cadet Corps in 
Canada in Youth of the Empire Shooting Matches. 



Visit of Dr. Griffith 



The School was honoured over the week-end of May 
19-20 by having as a guest the distinguished Headmaster 
of Bishop Ridley College, Dr. H. C. Griffith, who, on Satur- 
day evening, was kind enough to give a short talk on the 
subject of athletics. 

Having first of all dwelt briefly with sport in general, 
Dr. Griffith went on to speak more specifically about the 
game of football, in which he has come to be recognized as 
the foremost schoolboy coach in Canada. He outlined the 
history of football through all its varying stages of de- 
velopment, and related several interesting anecdotes con- 
cerning the causes for the adoption of new rules of play. 
The speaker finished by giving us a few hints about Rid- 
ley's successes and asserting that a team's greatest advan- 



Ig TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

tages are not trick plays, but the fundamentals of good 
kicking, passing, tackling, blocking and catching. 

The following day, Dr. Griffith delivered the sermon 
at the Evensong service. 



To honour the memory of the late President of the 
United States, the School observed two minutes' silence on 
April 14. 




S CHOP L 
O E6 AT t S 



Peacetime Military Training 

On April 27, the School acted as host to a debating 
team from the University of Toronto Schools. The motion 
was: "Resolved that there should be instituted a year of 
compulsory military training for all physically fit Canadian 
males on reaching the age of eighteen". The affirmative 
was upheld by T.C.S. 

Dobell i opened the debate by pointing out that one 
quarter of all army recruits have been found medically un- 
fit, and suggested that peacetime conscription would raise 
health standards. After assuring the House that universal 
training would lead to no discrimination in later oppor- 
tunities, he emphasized the broadening influences of disci- 
pline, fellowship and vocational training as found in the 
services. 

Ritche, for the negative, stated that after losing a 
year of school, veterans seldom return to their studies. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 

After explaining how army life and discipline grossly dis- 
tort the viewpoint, he attacked the age of eighteen as ill- 
chosen and suggested that the incidental advantages of 
army life might be gained in the schools. 

Paterson i, in support of the motion, emphasized the 
need for Canada to take her place alongside the "Big Five" 
and to maintain a defence force compatible with this posi- 
tion. Of small cost, this force might also be of use in 
national emergencies, and the trainees would become more 
tolerant through service in other provinces. At the con- 
clusion of his speech Paterson executed an excellent dove- 
tailing of two points, for the whole of which he lacked 
sufficient time. 

Horan, of the opposition, illustrated the failure of mili- 
tary training to provide security in France and Italy, and 
dwelt on the relative unimportance of any Canadian con- 
tribution. He maintained that the cost of this enterprise 
would be high, and asserted that Canada's geographical 
position was a sufficient safeguard against aggression. He 
concluded by adding that, in any case, Quebec would block 
the introduction of the necessary legislation. 

Pearson i of T.C.S. refuted several points of the nega- 
tive before beginning his speech proper. In this address 
he urged Canada to lead the Middle Powers by making her 
contribution to an international army which, he said, would 
not be a national shield but a world necessity. 

Clarke of U.T.S. delivered the most telling speech of 
the evening. He recommended the adoption of a small but 
modem defence force in place of a vast conscript army 
which would soon need retraining. He then asked whether 
it was intended to ship trainees around Canada on a Cook's 
Tour, and indicated the chaotic bureaucracy to which the 
system would lead. Moreover, it would be necessary for 
medical reasons to excuse thirty per cent of the eighteen- 
year-olds, which would lead to widespread evasion and dis- 
unity. He felt also that conscription was contrary to the 
principles of democracy since it stamped out individualism. 



20 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

In his rebuttal, Dobell pointed out that the difficulties 
of imposing conscription did not enter into the debate, and 
said that he thought the trainees could look after them- 
selves. Military service, he maintained, has been shunned 
in democracies because the people were entitled to mani- 
fest their basically sellBsh natures. 

After a number of speeches from the floor, Mr. Bagley 
informed the chairman that in the opinion of the judges, 
the affirmative had won the debate by an extremely narrow 
margin. 



BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES 

AUSTIN, J. B.— Since the Fall of '41 until this Easter 
there has been no silence or shortage of laughs in Be- 
thune, for in that year "Bun" first was able to jimmy 
open the doors of T.C.S. John was one of those boys 
who leaves no official record of his activities, but there 
are few who will ever forget him. His eloquent and 
choice use of the English language has never been 
equalled in the annals of T.C.S. history and his "subtle" 
wit and charming recitations were worth travelling 
around the world to hear. Bunny played soccer occa- 
sionally, for a while looked into the game of basketball, 
ran for Bethune in the Oxford Cup, and even went to 
far as to take a hand at cricket. All these attempts, 
however, only convinced him the more that his most 
evident ability lay in "sporting" a pipe, and in the 
"Smoker" he was one of that institution's most revered 
members. As a scholar, Bunny was no Einstein, but 
he was nevertheless a most popular boy, even with the 
Masters. (We mean it). For his considerable contri- 
bution to School life and his outstanding ability to make 
people laugh, he was made a Senior last term. But was 
a great guy, and we hope he will always remember to 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 21 

visit the host of friends he left behind him at T.C.S. He's 
in the Army now and we wish him all the luck in the 
world. 



GILLAN, C. A. W.— "Slim" arrived in the fall of '42, and 
two days later was firmly ensconced in the "Smoker", 
from which he emerged only on two occasions. One was 
in the fall of '43, when he starred as an inside on Middle- 
side, and the other was exactly one year later, during 
the fall of '44, when he became one of the best linemen 
on the First Football Team. The rest of the year he 
spent in relative obscurity, playing bridge, at which he 
was known to get down as much as 1,600 points on a 
single hand, and studying, at which he was known to get 
75% ! One of the most popular members of the School, 
"Slim" was also one of the most modest, and was rarely 
without a smile. Off to the Army at Easter, we trust 
he will find a thriving fox-farm awaiting him at Pa ken- 
ham on his return from "the wars". 



GRIEG, J. G.— In the fall of 1940, a quiet, dark, new boy 
from Windsor was one of the many who entered T.C.S. 
for the first time. In the spring of '45 he was one of 
the few that left us, but not quite as unobstrusively as 
he had arrived. Although "B.J." 's first few years were 
occupied mainly in concocting new schemes (at which he 
excelled) for avoiding work of any kind, he seldom miss- 
ed a trick, and was rarely without a smile. Although 
never aspiring to great heights as a scholar, he was an 
excellent athlete. He played on both Littleside and Mid- 
dleside football teams and spent two seasons on Bigside, 
as well as being a first class track man. An ardent mem- 
ber of the Smoker, he managed to spend most of every 
winter term imbibing its atmosphere. A House Officer 
when he left us at Easter to join the Navy, "B.J." 's 



22 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

somewhat raucous laugh and air of hearty good fellow- 
ship will be missed by all, and we wish him the best of 
luck. 



HARE, D. S. — Doug came to the School in September, 
1942, from U.T.S., and settled down in Bethune's illus- 
trious middle dormitory as England's lone representa- 
tive. He was a member of the great VA2 form of that 
year, but distinguished himself more on the Middleside 
Soccer field and on the Junior Basketball team. By the 
end of his second year he had joined the honoured ranks 
of the Bigside sacristans; he annually represented his 
house in the Chess tournament, and did yeoman service 
in the Used Book Room. Doug's real gift was revealed 
on the stage, where on three stirring occasions he played 
the part of 'une belle femme'. His bearing, actions and 
speech were remarkably feminine, and it is rumoured he 
learned it all from his sister. (Yes, we said his sister!) 
With his true English modesty he was not one to call 
attention to himself or his many accomplishments. How- 
ever, his perseverance and dependability were crowned 
with success in his last two terms, when he became Head 
Sacristan, won full Soccer Colours, played Bigside Bas- 
ketball, and received House Officer privileges. Doug is 
soon returning to England with his family, leaving many 
friends behind who wish him the best of luck. 



McINTYRE, P. H. — A small, hard, black-haired, good-look- 
ing fellow sneaked nervously (?) into the School in Sep- 
tember, 1942. At first glance, he reminded you of an 
Italian Orange peddler, complete with violin, but he turn- 
ed out to be something quite different. (Editor's Note: 
Rather!). He was a star member of Bigside football 
for three years, being Co- Vice-Captain and earning a 
Distinction Cap in his final year. The field can't be the 
same without Herby knocking himself out all over the 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 23 

place or running about in his over-grown "Buck Rogers" 
uniform, pretending he was "Man Mountain" Mclntyre. 
He captained the "Smokeaters" in the Littleside Hockey 
League in his first year, and was a steady slugger on 
Middleside Cricket. He "acted" as manager of the hoc- 
key team last season, and treated his boys like a mother 
(Editor's Note: Oh yeah!). His general appearance, in- 
cidentally, was rather odd. His shirt-sleeves had the 
most peculiar habit of slipping down over his wrists and 
getting dirty on his ink-smeared hands. The other dis- 
tinctive feature was his "Dunhill" which, it is beheved, 
never had a chance to cool down. He was made a Senior 
in the fall, and carried out his duties in his own "little" 
way. Last Valentine's day, a registered letter appeared 
in the mail ; it was his draft call ! He has now left us to 
join the army, but we won't forget his solo on "Don't 
Fence Me In" at the School Dance for a long time. So 
long. Herb. Hie! Come up and see us sometime. 



ROBARTS, G. L. — "Ginger" George scampered up the 
School Hill, gambolled around the playing fields, and 
finally crawled into Bethune House in the fall of 1942. 
He at once proceeded about the job of making himself 
famous. One soon became accustomed to George wash- 
ing his socks in the bathroom, gathering in the coppers 
in the dorm blackjack games, or staring open-mouthed 
at the accomplishments of various school athletes. Yet, 
litttle does he realize how many of those self-same 
athletes stared at hun, as he ably barked out signals on 
Littleside Football, flashed around the boards while play- 
ing for Bigside (yes, Bigside!) Hockey, gathered in the 
speed balls on Middleside Cricket, or idly flicked a serve 
past a dumbfoimded tennis opponent — all this, despite 
an ever widening waist band. Yes, George excelled at 
extra-curricular activities. Even in the classroom no 
one could equal him at extra-curricular activities. 
"Rusty" really excelled, however, in rimning around the 



24 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

track, but this feat did not come naturally to him. It 
was only developed after constant practice because 
George just couldn't seem to get to bed in time! As 
calm, cool and collected as ever (for the benefit of 
strangers, that is benevolent sarcasm), George quietly 
packed up his bags at the close of last term and set off 
on his quest for the sea. By the way, your uniform will 
attract the opposite sex, George, so keep your hat on, 
and good hunting! 



ROBSON, P. C.— Pete arrived at T.C.S. last year, fresh 
from several "adventurous" years at Walkerville Col- 
legiate, to make a name for himself in certain quarters 
of the "underworld". An ardent "choir boy", a member 
of this year's Bigside squad, and a full-fledged sunbather 
on the Bethune terrace, Pete made many friends in his 
rather brief stay here. Not what one might call a true 
student, his main activities appeared to centre around 
the "smoker" and several special "parties" in good old 
Windsor, the former taking up most of his time, and the 
latter most of his thoughts! Never idle, Pete always 
seemed either on the verge or in the middle of some new 
enterprise. He will be remembered as the only Smoker 
Member ever to become baptized and confirmed on the 
same day! The Navy took him at Easter, and we wish 
him the best of luck. 



WARNER, J. R. de C. — The name Warner brings to mind 
two things — red hair and Delahaye. During his whole 
stay, he was never without the former (although there 
was a decided thinning after one of Gordon's haircuts), 
and as for Delahaye — well, you just couldn't say one 
name without the other. "Wein's" reputation was de- 
finitely made on the football field; anyone who has ever 
seen him try to catch a football might wonder why he 
wanted to be a backfielder or, for that matter, ever had 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 25 

been one. Even if he couldn't catch a ball, he certamly 
could tackle the man coming through the line with the 
ball. An inside on Bigside for two years, his "double- 
action" method of getting through the line always left 
his opponents on their faces. Nor were his talents re- 
stricted to football, for his drive and determination on 
the Gym. floor earned him a First Team Basketball 
Colour. But this was the end. Neither cricket, nor 
tennis, nor track, nor soccer could entice him out of the 
"Smoker", where he spent his time relaxing pleasantly. 
In fact, he spent so much time in this manner that he 
was obliged to get up in the early hours of the morning 
to atone for his sins — and voluntarily, too! When he 
left us as Easter, "Wein" was a Senior of long standing, 
a member of two first teams and of the Sixth Form. May 
he ever have as much success and popularity in the U.S. 
Navy, where he follows the footsteps of his brother. 



Valete 

Austin, J. B. — ^VIB; Senior. 

GHlan, C. W.— VC; House Oflficer; XII. 

Greig, J. G.— VIB; House Officer; Middleside XII. 

Hare, D. S.— VIA; House Officer; XI; Middleside V; Head 
Sacristan; "Record" Staff. 

Huxley, T.— VB; Littleside V; "Record" Staff. 

Murray, J. C— IVA2. 

Mclntyre, P. H. — VIA; Senior; Distinction Cap XII; "Re- 
cord" Staff. 

Lamb, H. A.— VB; Littleside XI. 

Robarts, G. L.— VIB; House Officer; VI; Middleside XI. 

Robson, P. C— VIB; Middleside XH; Choir. 

Warner, J. R.— VIA; Senior; XH; V; "Record" Staff. 



Salvete 

Frith, H. S J. E. Frith, Esq., 

Paget East, Bermuda. 



26 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




Contributians 



"ONE CROWDED HOUR OF GLORIOUS LIFE IS 
WORTH AN AGE WITHOUT A NAME" 

(An answer to "The Influence of Wars on the Development of 
Civilization", appearing in the February issue) 

Beneath his feet, the hazy, purple heather bent for a 
moment, then sprang back as his weight moved on. His 
passage left no mark as he toiled up the steep slopes of 
the Ben, for heather is like the human race, stubbornly 
springing up again after being crushed. On reaching the 
summit, he looked back over the blue loch which sparkled 
at his feet, and at the purple hills in the distance. Their 
crests were lost in the shimmering heat which hung like a 
pall over the countryside. He took out his watch. 

One hour since I started, he thought. One crowded 
hour of glorious life. One hour when I was at peace. One 
hour during which I contemplated all the fine things in 
life; when my mind was not full of morbid memories, and 
I could think of the classics, and better forms of govern- 
ment for my people He brushed his eyes with his one 

good hand .... And I could look at the countryside with- 
out seeing shell-holes, broken homes, — broken bodies. 

He smiled grimly at his wrist where his coat was 
neatly folded and sewn. 

Because an age brings war, does that mean it credits 
glory? he wondered. It is certainly no credit to the glory 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 27 

of God. Will names like Napoleon, the Kaiser, wear as 
well as those of Shakespeare, Confucius and Pitt ? Does war 
bring happiness, or is hero-worship a substitute for it in 
time of strife? Surely an age without a name — a hero's 
name — is better than one m which heroes abound, gaining 
their fame through the blood and agony of others. The 
world has never given peace a try, yet condemns peace for 
being dull. The hour I spent just now was far from dull, 
it was the best hour of my life, because no unworthy 
thought entered my head. If I could capture this mood 
and this place for other people, it would be better than if 
I presented Hitler himself to the executioner. The demo- 
cracies are winning their battle, but if this war could have 
been avoided would people say at the end of the century 

"Chivalry and glory died with the last war"? Or 

would they say .... "Our decade has a great name; it has 

had the longest peace ever known to mankind"? 

He halted and gazed around him. 

"Thank you, Lord," he said, "I owe you much for this." 

He stooped and tucked a leather case under the 

heather, then turned and strode away. The gold lettering 

on the lid stated simply 

"Croix de Guerre" 

"For valour exceeding the call of duty." 

p. A. Richardson — Form VI 



IMPRESSIONS OF THE DAM 

Lazily I stretched out on a high ledge beside the old 
Ganaraska dam and let my mind wander. It was a warm 
March day with barely a cloud above, except for one wisp 
straggling off to the east. The ice and snow were melting 
rapidly and the waters of the river were swirling smoothly 
downstream. As the water neared the remains of the huge 
cement blocks, it flowed more swiftly; then, it was sud- 
denly and strongly caught in a rush and poured over the 



28 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORp 

dam. Bubbling and foaming, it lay at the bottom, then, 
gathering itself together, it slowed its pace and continued 
down the small river, between banks covered with gray 
snow, dotted here and there by some young blades of grass 
which had been bold enough to peek out from under their 
winter blanket. 

From my position by the side of the dam, I looked 
down on the foaming torrent and eddying pools. Strangely, 
I could not lift my gaze. Some hidden force of the smoothly 
creased waters below held my eyes compellingly. I stared 
down for a long while and my eyes looked deep into the 
stream as it slipped over the edge of the dam to join the 
jumbled current below. 

As I kept gazing, several groups of boys down at the 
side of the water were knocking away the ice on the river. 
Even as I watched, a large chunk floated up to the brink 
of the falls and then crashed over, adding, for a second, 
its deep rumble to the droning roar of the torrent. At the 
foot, the ice, now smashed into many pieces, floundered for 
a moment and then was caught up once more in the cur- 
rent and carried swiftly on its way. 

Suddenly I remembered Tennyson's "Brook", and mar- 
velled at the seemingly endless flow of water over the dam. 
It was almost incredible that all year round, when I was 
in bed, in classes, at home, on the train, and here beside 
them, these waters continued to pour down the sluice-way, 
and that the dull monotonous thundering of the falls would 
always toll out above every other sound. As I wondered 
at this, I thought of the others in former years who must 
have stood nearby — or perhaps at this very spot — and 
mused over the reflections that now gripped my imagina- 
tion. But as I pondered over these thoughts I turned, and 
even as I turned to look down again at the rushing stream 
its magic vanished. I saw the torrent tumbling down and 
the mist rising from the bottom and the boys hacking at 
the ice. I saw what anyone would see; but no longer did 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 29 

I feel the former fascination, that strange and wonderful 
attraction the flowing waters had held for me. 

I felt a sense of loss, of joy departed and irretrievable, 
almost of loneliness. What a pure, clean sensation it had 
been, what a freshness it gave! And now it was gone. 
Slowly, dazedly I got up ; then, taking my eyes off the scene 
below, I turned and walked mechanically back to the road, 
on over the bridge and up the hill. At the top of the rise 
I glanced back and caught a glimpse of the swirling river 
which had so recently held a special charm for me and, in 
the past, perhaps for others. 

I walked on, quickening my step, and all at once, just 
for a moment, there flashed across my inward eye that 
wonderfully magic scene. Just for the shortest second I 
recaptured that first fine rapture, that hidden secret. I 
walked faster; I ran and ran faster, and ever faster. I 
felt happy and fresh and new again; I felt the inward joy 
of nature's revelation. 

J. M. Hallward — Form V 



DO YOU REMEMBER? 



When e'er I find myself alone — and pensive, 

I love to leave my daily cares behind, 

And drift into the land of memories. 

To bring back childhood days and friends to mind. 

My recollections all are ones of happiness, 

Of "cops 'n robbers", marbles, holidays, 

Of Hallowe'en, and Santa Claus, and fairies, 

And fireworks on the twenty-fourth of May. 

And, oh, how well I see the earnest industry 

Of building tree huts, snowmen, model planes; 

Or gathering wild berries for a penny sale, 

With liquorice from the corner store our gain. 

And what a thrill it was that mischief brought: 

To steal from old man Brown's apple tree. 

Or secretly arise at five to meet the milkman, 



30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

And pick the chocolate cake in our pantry. 

Or suddenly "forget" it's Sunday morning 

And meet the gang at "poop-tree paradise", 

To hike out to our dear old swimming hole 

And have a "skinner" in the river, cold as ice. 

Oh how we loved to hoax our placid neighbours 

By "tictacs", purses stringed, or knocks at doors; 

And when they caught us, we would all apologize, 

And get a piece of cake for being polite. 

And e'en on rainy days 'twas great adventure 

To set up armies on the attic floor, 

And lead a hundred thousand men to victory 

By ingenious tactics, equalled ne'er before. 

Oh, I am sure I could go on forever 

Dreaming of days I'll not enjoy again; 

How much I sometimes wish that time would turn 

Around, and once again I could be only ten. 

— T. W. Lawson — Form V 



MOOSE TALK 



Alec MacDougall was a middle-aged Indian of pure 
blood despite his acquired name. He was grinning as he 
left the Hudson's Bay Post, carrying in his hand a letter 
from his son, Jim, which the Factor had been kind enough 
to read to him. So Jim was in the American Army. He 
was working for the Americans — a great joke that. He 
would be well paid, anyway; they always did things in a 
lavish way down there. Alec would never forget some of 
the handsome tips he had been given while guiding for 
them in the hunting and fishing seasons. All these thoughts 
ran through his mind before he recalled an incident that 
had taken place during the moose season, some four years 
ago. 

He had been engaged as a guide for one week-end by 
Senator Wilbur Armstrong. The wealthy Texan intended 
to shoot moose in Florence Lake, a gem of Northern On- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 

tario some thirty-five miles north of the Post. In spite of 
his fear, Alec had consented to fly into the lake with his 
employer; arriving safely, he had prepared the camp and 
a good meal before the sun sank in a final blaze of glory 
behind the sheer, towering, granite cliffs on the north-west 
shore. 

The first rays of the reappearing sun wakened the 
Indian in the early hours of the following morning. Having 
nothing better to do, for he never slept after dawn, he 
made his way down to the smooth rock where his canoe 
was drawn up. While soft, hardly perceptible gusts of 
wind gradually cleared the mist from the lake, he silently 
propelled his craft into a shallow bay nearby. There, amid 
the tall reeds, stood two large and imposing bull moose. 
Since they were intent on eating, the Indian judged that 
they would not soon depart. He swiftly returned from 
whence he came and pulled his blankets over him as if he 
had not been up at all. 

A moment later, the white man was startled from 
slumber by his guide, who was whispering loudly, "Wake 
you, wake you, quick". 

In reply to the Texan's mumblings he continued, "Me 
smell moose". He sniffed the air around him again and 
added, "Me smell two bull moose". 

Alec had ordered his astonished employer to keep 
silent before the latter could begin to question him, and, 
having collected a gun and some ammunition, the pair 
quietly set out for the little cove. Sure enough. Senator 
Armstrong found two bull moose, managed to shoot both, 
and rewarded his guide more than generously before re- 
turning to the south. 

MacDougall mentally visualized all these things as he 
paddled away from the Post to his little shack. Though 
illiterate, he still kept here an issue of a popular, American 
sporting periodical which featured the amazing story of a 
Canadian Indian g^de, who could not only smell moose at 
half a mile, but could tell how many there were. 

— R. M. Kirkpatrick — Form VI 



32 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

A MONUMENT TO MAN 

The grave's a silent thing: whate'er 
We do while in this world is lost; 
The presidency of a state 
Is naught when we compare the true 
Accomplishments of One who died 
A martyr's death upon the cross. 
However, lives well-lived should be 
Remembered long. How else are we 
To set our course the perfect way? 
Christ's life, a beacon, shines upon 
Us from the past; we must have some 
Before us now, the path to show. 
He was that type of man: He tried 
To live, and then to die the best, 
Most useful way in which He knew. 
The weight of years of worry, strain 
And illness left their mark, and when 
He least expected bore him off. 
He strove for peace; He strove ahead 
To better ways to live; the man. 
The common man, was ever His 
Most salient thought. Some criticized, 
While others brought Him to the top 
Where He could put His plans in play; 
Republican or Democrat, 
Whate'er He was, He stood for peace, 
And honour, common good for all. 
But surely what He did while in 
This world will live long after He 
Is gone: A monument to man. 

— J. R. Llgertwood — Form VI 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL REXX)RD 33 

THE TREES STILL STAND 

The fearful storm's wind tore relentlessly at the huge 
pines that fringed the small lake, the rain slashed at the 
foliage and rutted the earth around the trees' roots. At 
quickening intervals, loud crashes penetrated through the 
menacing wind. The more sturdy ones fought against the 
fearful onslaught. Then, almost as quickly as the storm 
had come, it died, and the dark thunder clouds were herded 
away by the prevailing winds, grumbling as they went. 
The sky became clear and cool as the rays of the sunset 
sky crept stealthily back to the stricken area, spreading 
warmth to the moisture laden trees which began to right 
themselves. The sun dipped down behind the thickly 
wooded ridge in its final stage of beauty, painting the sky 
red and purple, tapering off to a lovely pale blue. An 
innocent cloud was given a glorious golden hue. The leaves 
waved in ever-strengthening applause at this spectacular 
sight, given to the battered trees as a reward for holding 
out against the malevolent storm. Finally, the curtain of 
night ended the beautiful scene, leaving the audience no 
chance for a curtain call. But, as the night blackened, the 
stars did their best to wink at the sleeping world, thus 
giving a twinkling ballet and covering the earth with a 
silvery coat until the dawn should come; then, once more, 
the strengthened trees would meet the day. 

P. L. E. Goering — Form IV 



We wish to apologize for the inadvertent appearance 
in the April issue of the "Record", of a short story closely 
resembling one in the "Reader's Digest". 



34 TRINITY COLi-EGE SCHOOL RECORD 




orr THE 



THE COURTSHIP OF FADED LELY 

(Taken from the Indian Legend) 

Canto I: In which the plight of the fair maiden, Faded 
Lily, is revealed. 
By the shores of Lake Re-Volting, 
Dwelt the lovely Faded Lily. 
Her features, sad, were slightly jolting 
But her shape was really dilly. 
Dwelt in a tepee by the water 
(Air-Conditioned, central heating) 
While her papa, Creeping Otter, 
Printed bank-notes without ceasing. 
Braves for miles and miles around 
Steered clear of lovely Faded Lily, 
And foolish as perhaps it sounds, 
It wasn't silly, rilly! 

Canto II: In which a noble warrior comes to rescue her, 
and the villain is revealed. 
Until one day through Ringworm Pass, 
Across the Plains of Trench-foot, came 
The mighty warrior "Out-of-gas," 
A brave of international fame. 
Came from out the western water 
To the shores of Lake Re-Volting, 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 35 

Came for Creeping Otter's daughter 
Came with eagle plumes a-moulting. 
And his rival for the hand 
Of the shy, retiring maiden 
Was the villain, "Hot-dog- stand," 
Feared throughout the Flat-feet nation. 
For he could spit a hundred paces 
When his wind was good and sound, 
And rabbits dared not show their faces 
In this monster's hunting-groimd 

Canto III: In which the struggle for the maiden takes 

place. 
And so these braves of well-known might 
Met, at a cool-green shaded patch 
Of grass, and pledged, for their awful fight 
That king of struggles, a spitting match! 
In the blackness of the night-time 
The struggle waged, until 
When the sun began its climb, 
One warrior-brave lay stark and still. 
The hunter stretched out by the water 
On the coldness of the sand, 
The loser of C. Otter's daughter. 
Was, of course, great "Hot-dog-stand"! 
And "Out-of-gas", the noble victor, 
Went to claim his conquered bride, 
But when he saw the Lily's picture 
He, too, lay down and died. 

J. H, Caldbick — Form V 




36 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




IMPRESSIONS OF THE SEASON 

It is May, the temperature is up to 70 degrees, cricket 
is in full swing, the end of the term is less than a month 
away and the fishing season is open — yet I've been asked 
to write some impressions of the hockey season, of all 
things ! 

Those four months of hockey seem a long way off now 
and my impressions are vague — vague and slightly mixed 
up with swimming, basketball, cricket and a trip to Niagara 
Falls. That trip to Niagara Falls was the highlight of 
the season. Such nice ice at Port Colborne, too: they say 
that it was artificial ice — real, blue-painted, artificial ice! 
And those roomy, air-conditioned coaches were so cool, 
not a bit tiring! The barometer is rising and so would 
those Ganaraska brown trout be rising. Hare's Ear should 
be good to-day. 

Huycke was Captain of the hockey team, and provided 
real leadership. No novelty, of course, for Huycke to be 
Captain of a School team. He should have had that cast 
put on before he boxed Hogarth and not afterwards. Daw- 
son kept wickets with few byes. I mean he stopped every- 
thing that could be reasonably expected, and also some 
very remarkable and unreasonable ones. Campbellford 
forwards found Dawson most unreasonable at times. 
Howard is Vice-Captain of Cricket and is said to be one 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 37 

of the best bats in the School. He was also a standout on 
the defence in hockey, being one of the smoothest skaters 
we've had at T.C.S. in a long time. On second thought, 
Hare's Ear might not be so good to-day — a bit too cloudy. 
Dawson, Huycke, Howard were awarded Distinction Caps. 
These awards were made after the School Dance and there- 
fore had little practical value. Dobell i is Captain of Track 
and Vice-Captain of Hockey and he runs very fast. He 
skated the same way at the centre forward position on the 
first line. The School and Captain Batt won the Imperial 
Challenge Shield again this year. Dobell had a very good 
shot also. He hit the bull's eye, ankle-high, many times, 
and made it possible for Sinclair and McMurrich to do the 
same. Some chance that Sinclair and McMurrich are com- 
ing back next fall. That means two running halves, one 
quarterback, one plunging half, two passers. 

But here, these are hockey impressions. McMurrich 
was high scorer on the team, being very useful wdth his 
bat just off the crease. The opposition always claimed 
that he was just in the crease, while the referees were of 
two minds about it all season. Sinclair was probably the 
most consistent forward on the team. After all, he is the 
Sport's Editor. He is also very good at aquatics — an 
extremely useful accomplishment this spring around T.C.S. 
There are two feet of water in Mr. Kerr's new jumping pit 
already. Another six inches and we are going to stock it. 

How Hope missed the Debating team is a mystery. He 
was the best debater, certainly, on the hockey squad and 
a pretty good centre-forward, too. He gambled with his 
shoulder (U.S. Tracks being closed as of January 1) and 
we were all delighted that he won. A very courageous 
piece of work. Roenisch, Gilbert and Robarts rounded out 
the forward lines. The word "rounded" is used advisedly 
and has no reference to the figure Gilbert cut on the ice. 
As a matter of fact, Gilbert was one of the best at all times. 
The so-called second line often saved the day for the team. 
Roenisch played with a smile on his face all the time. He 



38 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

even hit someone on the nose while smiling. This proved 
very confusing to the opposition; but the referee knew 
what to do. Roenisch was the most improved player on 
the team this year, and Robarts is in the navy. If he pur- 
sues Japanese subs with the same gusto he had while 
chasing the puck, the war in the Pacific won't last too long. 

Davidson and Pearson i relieved Huycke and Howard 
— Pearson and U.N.R.R.A. certainly go together. Davidson 
played well when given a chance and was particularly good 
defensively. He scored twice and assisted on several goals, 
very much to the surprise and joy of everyone, including 
Davidson. And, very seriously, it should be added that 
sport would always be in a very high place indeed if every 
boy showed the same attitude which Pearson did during 
the hockey season. Mclntyre i, in his big boots, and Fen- 
nell in the goal judge's cage, complete the picture. Mc- 
lntyre was an excellent manager; Fennell, next winter, 
should be our regular goal-keeper. 

The team saw a fair portion of Southern Ontario, made 
many good friends, had some very loyal supporters, and all 
in all had a fine season. And we almost won the champion- 
ship. Excuse me while I go and dig up some garden hackle. 

— A.B.H. 



SOHOOL vs. POWASSEN 
At Oshawa, March 21; Won 9-3 

Trinity College School moved into the finals of the 
M.O.H.A. Juvenile "B" league by defeating Powassen 9-3. 
Despite Mousseau's early first period goal the School never 
seemed to be in danger and had little trouble in winning. 

The first period opened slowly, with neither team able 
to gain an immediate advantage. Mousseau opened the 
scoring after five minutes when he took McCloskey's pass 
close in to beat Dawson. The School immediately carried 
the play with new vigour into Powassen's end, where they 
kept it for most of the remainder of the period. Hope 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 39 

evened up the score when he took Huycke's pass at the 
blue-line and tallied, and Howard put T.C.S. up one when 
a combination with Dobell and Sinclair clicked. Huycke 
and Dobell each scored before the end of the period to make 
it 4-1 for the School. 

Twenty-four seconds after the second period opened, 
Sinclair scored on a lovely play from Huycke and Dobell. 
Powassen took advantage of Huycke's penalty to press, but 
excellent defensive work and back-checking kept them off 
the score sheets. Play see-sawed back and forth, both 
goalies being called upon to make sensational saves, and 
not until three minutes before the end of the period was 
the School able to score, Hope being the marksman. The 
period ended with T.C.S. scrambling around the Powassen 
net, and the score 6-1. 

Dobell opened the scoring in the final frame, eleven 
seconds after the opening face-off, Sinclair getting the 
assist. Powassen got their second goal of the game three 
minutes later, Piper scoring from Mousseau. Huycke, how- 
ever, nullified this effort when his hard shot from the blue- 
line glanced off a stick to beat Hummel. Davidson got the 
School's final counter a few minutes later when he blasted 
a shot from the red-line. Play evened up for the remainder 
of the period. Powassen showed good combination but 
was unable to get it past Dawson until, with less than a 
minute to go, Mousseau scored his second goal of the game 
on a break-away with Piper to make the final score 9-3. 

The game was dominated by the hard force-checking of 
the T.C.S. forwards, and the School's victory was mainly 
due to this work. Huycke and Howard also showed welj 
on defence. Despite the score, Hummel was excellent in 
the Powassen nets, while Mousseau was their best forward. 

Powassen — Goal, Hummel; defence, Hodgson, Ktmkel; centre, 
Mousseau; wings, McCloskey, Piper. Alternates: Kiunbel, Hyddle, 
Jamieson, Gimderson, Paul. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
\vings, McMurricli, Sinclair. Alternates: Gilbert, Hope, Roenisch, 
Robarts, Pearson, Davidson, Femiell. 



40 TRINITY COLJ-,EGE SCHOOL RECORD 

SCHOOL vs. WELLAND 

At Port Colborne, March 28: Lost 11-7 

The Hockey team packed their trunks a day early last 
term, and headed from Toronto for the General Brock 
Hotel the following noon. The visit to Niagara was the 
first for some and old stuff to others, but apart from losing 
a hard game on bad ice that night, all who went to the 
Falls and the States more than enjoyed themselves. 

In the first of the Juvenile "B" O.M.H.A. finals, the 
School carried the play, and the quick turning of the tide 
in the last period is hard to comprehend. Barker of Wel- 
land opened the scoring, but the School came back with 
one from Gilbert and another from Roenisch, Thus, a 
fast, thrill-packed period ended 2-1 in the School's favour, 
much to the delight of Port Hopers who were informed of 
the period scores by telephone. 

The second period was much the same as the first, 
goals coming from Barker, Kafun and Rosette, to give Wel- 
land a 4-2 lead. This, however, lasted but a few minutes 
before the School again stepped ahead, first by one from 
McMurrich, then two from Gilbert and one from Dobell, 
The second period closed with a 6-4 T.C.S. lead. 

Disaster fell upon the School in the next twenty 
minutes, Welland scoring seven goals, six of which came in 
three minutes and sixteen seconds, when the School had 
two badly timed penalties. Sinclair was the School's lone 
marksman, tallying twenty seconds before the closing 
whistle, to make the final count 11-7. 

Welland — Goal, Doyle; defence, Kafun, Beatty; centre, Ander- 
son; wings, Holmes, Barker. Alternates: Onda, Ort, Rosette, Belle, 
Howick, Montanna. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke, Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurrich. Alternates: Gilbert, Roenisch, Hope, 
Davidson, Fennell. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 4J 

SCHOOL vs. WELLAND 
At Oshavva, March 29: Lost 11-4 

The second game of the finals was nothing like the 
first, for although the ice was the best possible, the teams 
had both slowed down considerably, due to so much travel- 
ling. After a few minutes of play, however, there seemed 
to be no doubt as to the outcome of the game, yet the 
School fought admirably with a determined, never-say-die 
spirit. Howick and Barker were the Welland marksmen 
in the first period, while McMurrich was the School's lone 
scorer. The second and third periods were much alike, 
Welland racking up seven goals in the second and two in 
the last, to two in the second and one in the third for the 
School. Thus, Welland took the game by an 11-4 count 
and the series by a decisive 22-11 score. 

Howick, Anderson and Holmes, all on the same line, 
bagged three goals each, and Barker scored two. The 
School's goals were divided amongst McMurrich, Dobell, 
Sinclair and Gilbert. The main star of the series, however, 
was Dawson, the School's goalie, who, despite the number 
of goals scored upon him, did more than his share for the 
team. No one knew it, but he carried a case of chicken pox 
with him in both games. Much credit also goes to the 
Captain, Eddie Huycke, who played two stand-out games 
with a badly broken thumb. 

Welland — Goal, Doyle; defence, Kafun, Beatty; centre, Ander- 
son; wings, Holmes, Barker. Alternates: Onda, Ort, Rosette, Belle, 
Howick Montajina. 

T.C.S. — Goal, Dawson; defence, Huycke; Howard; centre, Dobell; 
wings, Sinclair, McMurrich. Alternates: Gilbert, RoenLsch, Hope, 
Robarts, Davidson, Fennell. 



BIGSIDE HOCKEY SCX)RING ANALYSIS 

The following are the individual scoring points, as re- 
vised from the last issue: 



42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Goals Assists Total 

1. McMurrich 33 30 63 

2. Sinclair 29 31 60 

3. Dobell i 24 31 55 

4. Gilbert 29 19 48 

5. Roenisch 12 17 29 

6. Howard 12 16 28 

7. Huycke i 5 21 26 

8. Hope 7 8 15 

9. Robarts 5 5 10 

10. Davidson 2 2 4 

11. Pearson i Oil 




PICKfl 



EDITORIAL 

The period between the middle of April and the middle 
of May is devoted annually to the formation of the Cadet 
Corps and the perfecting of various Gym. displays. As a 
result, the activities on the playing fields are cut consider- 
ably, and it is often difficult to organize team practices 
with hopes of a full turn-out. Nevertheless, cricket started 
with a bang when the grass wicket was used for a practice 
game early in April. Cox i as Captain, Howard as Vice- 
Captain and Mr. Wilson as coach, supervised the team, 
which included five of last year's Colours and many cric- 
keters from Bermuda. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 43 

Middleside played the game seriously under the able 
guidance of Mr. Gwynne-Timothy, and a thorough ground- 
ing is being given for future play. Wilson was elected 
Captain and Vernon Vice-Captain. 

Littleside lost its traditional coach, but gained a 
valuable adviser in the Rev. Mr. Bagley, who took over Mr. 
Scott's duties. Gaunt was elected Captain and Pater- 
son iii Vice-Captain. 

Track came into the limelight, perhaps more than 
ever before, as we were the proud possessor of a full-time 
coach. Mr. Kerr took over in the full sense of the word, 
and the track team turned out regularly. Dobell i was 
elected Captain. 

The swimming team continued to operate this term, 
and here, also, meets were arranged, with the climax being 
the annual House Meet. 

Tennis has been enjoying its usual popularity, and the 
courts have been in constant use. 

An explanation might be in order regarding the ap- 
pearance of more hockey material in this issue. Owing to 
the late dates of the last three games, we were unable to 
report them in our last number. 

— E.McC.S. 



UTTLE BIG FOUR SWIMMING MEET 

At Hart House, Toronto, March 17 

For the third year in a row, St. Andrew's College won 
the Little Big Four swimming meet. Only five points 
separated the first three, with T.C.S. second, Ridley third, 
and Upper Canada last. Two records were shattered, Say- 
lor of S.A.C. swimming the fifty yards free style in 25.8 
seconds, and Christie of Ridley swimming the two hundred 
yards free style in 2:27.4 minutes. The total scores were 
S.A.C. 45; T.C.S. 41; B.R.C. 40; U.C.C. 10. Following are 
the individual results: 



44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



Diving — 




1. 


Errington (S.A.C.) 


2. 


Sinclair (T.C.S.) 


3. 


Huycke (T.C.S.) 


4. 


Malcomson (S.A.C.) 


5. 


Jarvis (B.R.C.) 


Medley — 




1. 


T.C.S. Time: 1:36.4 minutes. 


2. 


B.R.C. Time: 1:37 minutes. 


3. 


S.A.C. Time: 1:38 minutes. 


4, 


U.C.C. Time: 1:42 minutes. 


200 Yard Free Style— 


1. 


Christie (B.R.C.) Time:2:27.4 (new record) 


2. 


Malcomson (S.A.C.) 


3. 


Bourne (S.A.C.) 


4. 


Lambert (T.C.S.) 


5. 


Frid (B.R.C.) 


50 Yard Free Style— 


1. 


Saylor (S.A.C.) Time: 25.8 (new record) 


2. 


Elder (S.A.C.) 


3. 


Irwin (T.C.S.) 


4. 


Ordonez (B.R.C.) 


5. 


Wilkie (B.R.C.) 


50 Yards Back Stroke— 


1. 


Cowley (U.C.C.) Time: 32.8 sec. 


2. 


Christie (B.R.C.) 


3. 


Beverley (S.A.C.) 


4. 


Powell (B.R.C.) 


5. 


Sinclair (T.C.S.) 


100 Yards Free Style— 


1. 


Elder (S.A.C.) Time:59.6 sec. 


2. 


Glen (B.R.C.) 


3. 


Sinclair (T.C.S.) 


4. 


Malcomson (S.A.C.) 


5. 


McTaggart (B.R.C.) 


50 Yards Breast Stroke— 


1. 


Huycke (T.C.S.) Time: 35 sec. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 45 

2. McGivem (B.R.C.) 

3. Kii-kpatrick (T.C.S.) 

4. Humphries (B.R.C.) 

5. Errington (S.A.C.) 
200 Yards Free Relay— 

1. T.C.S. Time: 1:51 minutes. 

2. B.R.C. 

3. S.A.C. 

4. U.C.C. 



ANNUAL BOXING COMPETITION 

The Boxing Competition, held at the close of last term, 
was closely contested, with all the boxers making a fine 
showing. Gaunt demonstrated fine style to win the Rous 
Cup for the best Novice performer, while Huycke i was 
awarded the Bradbum Cup for the best boxer by virtue 
of his third round technical knockout over Hogarth in the 
heavyweight class. 

Following are the results: 

Paperweight Novices 

First Round — Macklem beat Morgan ii; Hawke ii beat 
Prentice. 

Final — Hawke ii beat Macklem. 

Featherweight Novitees 

First Round — McLennan beat Morgan i; Deverall beat 
Spencer. 

Semi-Finals — McLennan beat Deverall; Wismer beat 
Newcomb. 

Final — Wismer beat McLennan. 

Bantamweight Novices 

First Round — Huycke ii beat Woods; MacLaren beat 
de Pencier. 

Final — MacLaren beat Huycke ii. 



46 TRINITY COT.T,F,GE SCHOOL RECORD 

Flyweight Novices 

First Round — Armour ii beat Scott. 
Final — Armour ii beat Drummond. 

Lightweight Novices 

First Round — Gaunt beat Gumming; MacLean beat 
Lamb. 

Final — Gaunt beat MacLean. 

Welterweight Novices 

Final — Tessier beat Taylor ii. 

Middleweight Novices 

First Round — ^Bermingham beat Alley. 
Final — Bermingham beat Pilcher. 

Bantamweight Open 

First Round — Barrow beat Sanborn. 
Final — Stewart beat Barrow. 

Lightweight Open 

First Round — Hyde beat Nicholson; Armour i beat 
Dumford. 

Final — Armour i beat Hyde. 

Welterweight Open 

First Round — Langdon beat Day; Grier beat Toole. 

Second Round — Goodbody beat Roenisch; McMurrich 
beat Pearson i; Main beat Whitfield; Langdon beat Grier. 

Semi-Finals — Langdon beat Goodbody; McMurrich 
beat Main. 

Final — McMurrich beat Langdon. 

Middleweight Open 

First Round — Cox ii beat Warner; Wilson beat Daw- 
son; Vernon beat Crowe; Cox i beat Huxley. 

Semi-Finals — Wilson beat Cox ii; Cox i beat Vernon. 
Final — Wilson beat Cox i. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 47 

Lightheavy Weight Open 

First Round — Wade beat Greenwood. 
Final — Wade beat Gilbert. 

Heavyweight Open 

First Round — Hogarth beat Hibbard. 
Semi-Finals — Hogarth beat Drew; Huycke i beat Kirk- 
pa trick. 

Final — Huycke i beat Hogarth. 



GYMNASIUM COMPETITIONS 

Bigside Gym. 

The Bigside Gym. Competition produced one of the 
most well balanced and skilled gym. teams the School has 
had in years. Gibson ii set the pace with 207 out of a pos- 
sible 215 points and O'Grady followed with a close 206, 
Jarvis placed third with 200 points and Whitfield, Lambert. 
Cox ii, Huycke i, Riddell, Butterfield i, and McDowell finish- 
ed in that order. 



Middleside Gym. 

The standard of work on Middleside was well up this 
year. Curtis carried off first place position, and was closely 
followed by Conyers ii and Crowe, who shared second 
honours. Payne, Lawson, Paterson ii and Deverall finish- 
ed in that order and were awarded colours by virtue of 
their good efforts. 



Littleside Gym. 

Littleside gym. work was below the usual par. Lack 
of practice was evident, and as a result only four boys 
were awarded colours. In order of merit they were Gum- 
ming, Gill, Welsford and Prentice. 



48 TRINITY COLJL.EX5E SCHOOL RECORD 

Gjinnasium Cup 

The Gymnasium Cup was won by Brent House by the 
considerable margin of 2088-1185 points. 



SENIOR SQUASH TOURNAMENT 

The Bullen Cup for the winner of the Senior Squash 
Tournament was won by Howard in a close final series with 
Dobell i. Both had previously advanced to the finals un- 
beaten in a single game. The entries were slightly lower 
than usual this year but the standard of play was up to 
that of former years. 



JUNIOR SQUASH TOURNAMENT 

The Fred Watts Prize for Littleside Squash was won 
by French ii who defeated Tessier 3-1 in the final round. 
There was a large entry, and the juniors seem keen to play 
the game. 



COLOURS 

Hockey 

The following have been awarded Colours for the 1945 
season : — 

First Team — Davidson, Dawson, Dobell i, Gilbert, Hope, 
Howard, Huycke i, McMurrich, Robarts, Roenisch, 
Sinclair. 

Half First Team — Fennell, Pearson i. 

Middleside — Bird, Campbell i, Currie, Dobson, Hawke i, 
Lambert, Lawson, Fisher, Macdonald, Taylor ii. 

Littleside — Brewer, Bronfman, Dobell ii, French ii, Gaunt 
Goodbody, Hyde, Jarvis, Newcomb, Rogers, Wells. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 49 

Basketball 

The following have been awarded Colours for the 
1945 season: — 

First Team — Drew, French i, Toole, Wade, Warner. 
Half Fi^rst Team — Carhartt, Ligertwood. 
Middleside — Edmonds, Hare, Taylor i, Hibbard, McDowell, 

Wismer. 
Littleside — Crowe, Evans, Mahaffy, Whitehead. 



Gym. 

The following have been awarded Colours for the 

1945 season: — 

First Team — O'Grady, Gibson ii, Jarvis, Whitfield, Lam- 
bert, Cox ii, Riddell, Huycke i, Butterfield i. 

Half First Team— McDowell. 

Middleside — Curtis, Conyers ii, Crowe, Payne, Paterson ii, 
Lawson, Deverall. 

Littleside — Cumming, Gill, Welsford, Prentice. 



Squash 

The following have been awarded Colours for the 1945 
season : — 
Half First Team— Howard, Dobell i. 



Distinction Caps 

In consideration of their consistantly outstanding 
play, Distinction Caps for Hockey have been awarded to 
E. J. M. Huycke, E. Howard and V. Dawson . 



The Kerr Trophy 

The Kerr Trophy for the most valuable player on 
Bigside Hockey has been won by E. Howard. 



The Bamett Trophy 

The Bamett Trophy for the most valuable player on 
Bigside Basketball has been won by C. G. H. Drew 



50 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 




mmm 








Editor-in-Chief M. E. Wright 

Assistants D. A. Chester, T. G. R. Brinckman, 

P. T. Macklem, P. B. Mackenzie. 

On looking back through past numbers of the Record, 
we have been struck by the frequent allusions we have 
made to the weather! We have firmly resolved not to men- 
tion it this time — it is, indeed, unmentionable! 

The boxing competition, which took place at the end 
of last term, was a good one. There was a larger J.S. 
entry than usual and it produced many very good bouts. 

Some forty boys have entered the Junior School Tennis 
Tournament this year, and the competition promises to be 
very close. 

Again this year the Junior School responded very 
generously to the Red Cross drive for funds. The total of 
$127.00 which was reached is a very good effort. 

Our sincere thanks to Mrs. Alan Stewart for a gift of 
costumes and a number of B.O.P.'s. 

Starting this term, the bounds for the top forms in the 
J.S. were considerably extended. Boys in these forms 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 

are allowed Town Leave on Saturday morning and Country 
leave on half holidays and Sunday. 

The Junior School joined in the V-E Day chapel ser- 
vice with the Senior School. In the evening there was a 
bonfire and a feed for the School. On Tuesday we watched 
the parade in the town, and then ran off some of the pre- 
liminary heats for Sports day. The boys cooked their ovm 
picnic lunch outside. 

Our best wishes go with Richard Abel- Smith who has 
left us to return to England. 



School Appointments 



Captain of Cricket N. F. Thompson 

Vice-Captains H. E. Thompson, P. A. C. Ketchum 

Warden of Tennis D. V. Ketchum 



V-E DAY 

To a Junior School boy, nearly six years represents a 
large portion of his life. It means that many of the 
younger boys have no recollection of the beginning of the 
war — to them there has been war for as long as they can 
remember. Even to the oldest lads in the J.S. the early 
years of conflict are not clearly marked except in cases 
where a father or a brother went off to war. 

Now, V-E Day has come at last! The fathers and 
brothers can be expected home in the not too distant 
future. The small nine-year-old, who watched them go 
off to war, has now grown into a husky fourteen-year-old. 
How proud they will be of each other! 

In the midst of the general rejoicing our thoughts 
turn to those boys whose fathers have given their lives 
that their sons might grow up in a free world. We are 
confident that these lads will grow up to be worthy of them. 
We also think with deep gratitude of the many Old Boys 



52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

from the Junior School who have fought and died so gal- 
lantly. 

We are glad to think of what V-E Day will mean to 
our many English boys who have returned to their homes. 
They were good lads, and we wish them well in the years 
which lie ahead. 



THE VOLCANO 



We had been travelling for three hours now, heading 
for the new volcano which had erupted and started out of 
a corn field. In one hour more we would reach our destina- 
tion, which was a city by the name of Uruapan. From 
there, we would mount busses and ride ten mOes over a 
trail littered with cinders from the city to the volcano it- 
self. 

Arriving in Uruapan, we found everything, every nook 
and cranny, covered with at least a thin layer of cinders. 
They were continually raining down and getting into every- 
thing, even the food. 

We spent about an hour in Uruapan, and, having 
changed our clothes and eaten, we finally got onto some 
horses and started off for the volcano. 

After a long, hard, dusty ride, we saw through the 
cinder covered trees a reddish glow, which told us we were 
approaching the volcano. By now, every thirty or forty 
seconds you could feel the earth tremble like a jelly be- 
neath your feet. We also had to get off our mounts, as 
the cinders were so deep that the horses were just flounder- 
ing about, just as a horse flounders in deep mud. 

We kept on going, and suddenly, as we came around 
a bend, we saw the volcano. It looked just like a display 
of firecrackers on the fourth of July. Tremendous 
boulders, red hot, were being shot twenty -five hundred feet 
out of the crater, together with long red streamers of 
burning gasses. Over it all hung, like a great big cloud, a 
pall of dense, black smoke. Every once in a while you 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 

could hear a tinkle like the breaking of glass, where a 
boulder had fallen and, meeting the cold ground, had split. 

To the left of the flaming crater was a hole in the side 
of the volcano, where white-hot lava was pouring out and 
devouring everything in its path. Every so often you could 
see a flash of flame, where the lava had met a tree and was 
burning it up. Soon, the village of Paricatin, about two 
miles away, would be devoured by the lava. Already you 
could see people with their belongings making their way 
somewhere else to make a new home. 

Night was coming on, and with it came the rain. We 
started leading our horses back the way we had come. One 
last look, and then all you could see was a red glow through 
the trees. This glow meant beauty for some people and 
sadness and destruction for others. 

— Mackenzie i, Form III 



THE BOMBER 



My story is a short one; 

It's not a merry song. 

If you think my job's an easy one 

Then you are quite wrong. 

Early in the morning. 
And often in the night, 
I rise up from the runway 
Into the air to fight. 

On the way there is no sleeping — 

I fly, I dive, I zoom; 

If the enemy is in the sky 

I'll shoot them up quite soon. 

O'er the blazing target, 
Then the bombing run; 
To watch the bombs exploding 
Seems to be quite fun. 



54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

But every bomber's end must come, 
And every man's the same — 
I crashed into the hard, hard ground 
In the midst of song and fame. 

So, when you are rejoicing, 
In your humble prayers 
Think of the men and planes 
Lying here and there. 

And also when you're praying 
For us across the sea. 
Don't forget the bombers — 
Especially pray for me. 

— A. Croll, FormUlAlr 



THE END 



Slowly the emaciated figure crept over the snow on all 
fours ; he seemed to be a walking or crawling mass of frost. 
The wind and snow blew at him mercilessly. When he 
brought his foot up to push himself farther across the snow 
his knee, which showed through the rip in his trousers, 
was as red as the sun would have been, had it been shining. 

He raised his head slowly and one could see his eyes, 
almost out of their sockets, gaze through the brightly 
lighted window where he could just hear, above the noise 
of the wind, the merry-making and the crackle of the warm 
fire. 

He finally reached the door and his hand was slowly 
lifted towards the handle, which he failed to reach. After 
many futile attempts his hand dropped, his feet drummed 
on the snow, he gave a slow shudder, and he lay still. 

The wind howled mercilessly across the still body and 
the snow beat down on it. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 

The sun shone brightly and a cool breeze kept the air 
from becoming too hot. 

From the bottom of the valley in which stood the ham- 
let of Clivesbury, a small procession wound its way up the 
hill to the graveyard. 

It was a fine beginning of Spring. 

— J. F. D. Boulden, Form III 



CREE CRICKET 



Cricket is a funny game. 

On this we all agree; 

But of all the funny games I've seen, 

Was one played with a Cree. 

Now Cree's an Injun tribe, you know, 
A right nice one at that, 
But this bright boy, Kiji's the name, 
Was really good at bat. 

For cricket is an English game, 
You'll not deny that truth. 
But when an Injim tries his hand. 
Well, that's not quite forsooth. 

But you just wait and see 
The outcome of this game. 
And you'll agree with me, I bet, 
That Injuns can be tame. 

The play has started, the Injun bats, 
He knocks it for a four; 
With one loud whoop he runs the pitch. 
Then hits it for four more. 

Now this went on for quite a while. 
Until, bad luck, he's caught; 
For then the wickets fell quite fast, 
And the Cree's team came to naught. 



56 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

The Cree was in the field at last, 

To play long leg was his, 

And all the balls which that day were hit, 

To catch them was his biz. 

He ran here, there and everywhere, 
A stupid fool was he, 
But when you take all this in hand. 
He was only just a Cree. 

— R. B. Mackenzie, Form IIA2 



THE CONVOY 



It had been a long, hard trip. The convoy had suffered 
both from nature and the enemy. Yet, on the tenth day, 
the storm raged with ever increasing fury and the sub- 
marine detectors hummed louder. The decks were coated 
with ice and it was practically suicide to go on deck. Over 
half the crew had had some part of their body frozen at 
one time or another, and the storm still raged. One man 
was swept clean off the deck while trying to get aft and 
was never seen again. On the morning of the eleventh day 
the storm abated a little, and by noon the other ships that 
had not got off their course were visible. They all looked 
to be in no better shape than we were. 

At five o'clock that night, the submarine detectors 
ceased to hum and the sea was almost back to normal. The 
following morning land was sighted and we were pretty 
well on our course. Our escort then left us and we made 
port. The whole convoy had lost five men and two serious- 
ly injured. One ship was lost, but most of its crew had 
been rescued. Yet, despite all this, "The Convoy Got 
Through". 

—J. McGUl, Form IIB. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 57 

ATHLETICS 

Gym. Competition 

The Junior School Gym. competition set a very high 
standard this year. Much of the credit for this is due to 
O'Grady and Gibson who gave so willingly of their time 
to help the Junior Schools boys in their extra gym. prac- 
tices. 

Possible Score 90 

1. Thompson 85.5 

Hughes 85.5 

3. Mackenzie i 84 

Panet 84 

5. McConnell 82 

6. Gill 79 

7. Graham 76.5 

8. Boulden 75.5 

9. Ketchum i 72 

10. Knox 47 

Colours have been awarded to those who obtained 
60% of the possible score. 

M. J. Dignam has been awarded an extra colour. 



JUNIOR SCHOOL BOXING COMPETITION 

The Orchard Cup for the best boxer has been awarded 
to M. E. Wright. 

50 lbs. Competition 

First Round — Ketchum iii beat Boultbee ii. 
Final — Ketchum iii beat Wyman ii. 

60 lbs. Competition 

First Round — Willoughby beat Kelk. 
Final — Willoughby beat Carr-Harris. 



58 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

70 lbs. Competition 

First Round — Spencer beat Church; Knox ii beat 
Price; McDerment beat Tuer; McDonough beat Shannon. 

Semi-Final — Spencer beat Knox ii; McDerment beat 
McDonough. 

Final — Spencer beat McDerment. 

80 lbs. Competition 

First Round — ^McRae beat Gill; Woods ii beat Boult- 
bee i; Williams beat Adamson. 

Second Round — Thompson ii beat Peters; Woods ii 
beat McRae; Southam beat Williams; Gate beat Wyman i. 

Semi-Final — Thompson ii beat Woods ii; Southam beat 
Gate. 

Final — Thompson ii beat Southam. 

90 lbs. Competition 

First Round — Bate beat Woods i; Wright beat Grout; 
Brinckman ii beat Saunders; Stevens beat Macklem; Tes- 
sier beat Potter; Van Straubenzee beat Strathy. 

Second Round — Bate beat Moff itt ; Wright beat Brinck- 
man ii; Tessier beat Stevens; Van Straubenzee beat Mac- 
kenzie i. 

Semi-Final — Wright beat Bate; Tessier beat Van 
Straubenzee. 

Final — Wright beat Tessier. 

100 lbs. Competition 

First Round — Groll beat Ketchum i; Mackenzie ii beat 
Brinckman i. 

Second Round — Boulden beat McGill; Mackenzie ii 
beat Groll; Dignam ii beat Howard; Greenwood beat 
Rogers. 

Semi-Final — Mackenzie ii beat Boulden; Dignam ii 
beat Greenwood. 

Final — Dignam ii beat Mackenzie ii. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 59 

110 lbs. and Over Competition 

First Round — McConnell beat Knox i; Thompson i 
beat Hogarth; Lawson beat McCaghey; Chester beat 
Weicker. 

Second Round — Stratford beat Graham; McConnell 
beat Thompson i; Chester beat Lawson; Hughes beat 
Brodeur. 

Semi-Final — Stratford beat McConnell; Hughes beat 
Chester. 

Final — Stratford beat Hughes. 



SALVETE 

Charron, Richard Clayton Dr. K. C. Charron, 

Tanganyka Territory, East Africa. 

Reford, Lewis Alexis Meighen L. E. Reford, Esq., 

230 Hospital Street. Montreal, P.Q 

Wells, Christopher Charles Lt.-Col. C. Wells, 

Washington, D.C. 

VALETE 

Abel Smith, Richard Francis H.R.H. Princess Alice, 

Countess of Athlone, 
Government House, Ottawa. 

Shannon, William Donald Wing Cmdr. H. B. Shannon, 

Port Hope, Ont 




60 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



>OLD 





NOTES < 




OLD BOYS' NOTES— I— On Active Service 
HONOURS 

Lieut. Peter Y. Taylor ('34-'35), D.F.C.: An official 
Army Air Force Communique reads as follows: "Covering 
the air attack on Morotai, as Yank landing barges scraped 
ashore on the Jap-held island, Lieut. Taylor and his crew 
members of a Catalina Flying boat, observed two fighter 
pilots floating in the water between Morotai and nearby 
Halmahera island, where they had been shot down. 

"Enemy gun positions were on one side of the fliers, 
while barge-mounted machine g^ins kept up an incessant 
cross fire on the other side. In spite of no fighter protec- 
tion, a choppy sea making the landing dangerous and Jap 
batteries opening up as the plane approached, the crew set 
the ship down within 100 feet of one pilot. 

"The rescue was made in a few minutes but the second 
pilot was killed by machine gun fire before the plane got 
to him." 

The citation reads as follows: "During the entire 
operation the rescue aircraft was subjected to incessant 
enemy barrage which damaged it severely. The outstand- 
ing courage and devotion to duty displayed by these crew 
members under hazardous conditions are worthy of the 
highest commendation. 

"Lieut. Taylor who escaped uninjured from the dar- 
ing rescue, has flown more than 75 rescue missions with the 
'Snafu Snatchers', 13th A.A.F. Rescue unit". 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 61 

Squadron Leader J. W. C. Langmuir ('35-'40), D.F.C.: 
The complete citation for the award reads as follows: 

"This officer has completed a large number of anti- 
submarine sorties over the North Atlantic. He has always 
displayed a high degree of skill and keenness of a most 
commendable nature in the performance of his duties. As 
captain of aircraft he pressed home two most determined 
attacks on an enemy submarine despite intense and heavy 
anti-aircraft fire. On another occasion he made an excel- 
lent attack on another U-boat. S/L Langmuir's qualities 
of courage, leadership and determination have been an in- 
spiration to all those with whom he has been associated". 

* * * m * 

The citation covering the award of the Croix de Guerre 
with Bronze Star, to Captam N. D. Slater ('21-'24), R.C.A., 
reads in part: "Though wounded Capt. Slater was able to 
reform a squadron, badly shot up by Nazi Artillery, after 
which they destroyed eight tanks". 

* « * « * 

Lieut. Gordon L. Rawlinson ('33-'36), Royal Canadian 
Dragoons, who has been awarded the Military Cross, is 
now back in Canada. The citation covering the M.C. reads: 
"On August 30, 1944, his troop v/as given the task of find- 
ing a crossing over the River Foglia in the area near Borgo 
S. Maria. This officer was the first across the river in the 
face of heavy mortar and machine gun fire and personally 
organized a defensive bridgehead which was immediately 
strongly counter-attacked by the enemy. This attack was 
repulsed after very hard fighting during which Lieut, 
Rawlinson displayed courage and leadership of the highest 
order. The advance was resumed. 

"On September 17, his troop was given the task of 
clearing the enemy in an area of railroad track from the 
River Melo to the River Marano. Upon reaching the 
Marano. Lieut. Rawlinson saw that the enemy had not yet 
consolidated on the opposite bank of the river. Lieut. 



62 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Rawlinson led his troop across the dangerous obstacle in 
face of very heavy fire. The enemy immediately counter- 
attacked after a heavy concentration of mortar fire and in- 
flicted seven casualties on his troop after fierce hand-to- 
hand fighting. Although twice wounded and weak from 
loss of blood Lieut. Rawlinson remained in the forefront of 
the battle for half an hour. By his great courage and 
skill he rallied his troop and under cover of smoke he 
evacuated all his casualties. By this time he was on the 
verge of collapse from exhaustion and wounds but he ex- 
tricated the remainder of his troop and remained until all 
his men had been withdrawn to cover before allowing a 
medical orderly to evacuate him". 

***** 

Major H. E. C. Price (1929), R.C.R., has been award- 
ed the M.B.E. 

***** 

Major Allan G. Magee, ('35-'38), R.C.R., was mention- 
ed in despatches for gallant and distinguished conduct. 

***** 

Brigadier B. M. Archibald, ('21-'23), Royal Engineers, 
has been awarded the D.S.O. 

***** 

Lieut.-Col. F. E. Wigle ('29-'32), Armoured Corps, who 
was killed in action on April 14, was awarded the O.B.E. 

and D.S.O. 

***** 

Lieut. Colin Patch ('38-'41), the Black Watch (R.H. 
R. of Canada, was Mentioned in Despatches, April 10, 
1945, for service in Normandy in 1944 while on loan 
to the King's Shropshire Light Infantry, British Army. 
Colin, who was severely wounded in action, July 20, 1944, 
was back on duty with a Holding Unit in England when 
this award was made. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 63 

Lieut. D. J. Lewis ('35-'37),R.C.N.V.R., was awarded 
the Certificate of the Royal Humane Society for life-saving 
in the English Channel during the Normandy invasion 
operations on D-Day-Plus-One, June 7, 1944. Lieut. Lewis, 
who had previously been Mentioned in Despatches for gal- 
lantry during the Dieppe landing operations, August 19, 
1942, is now serving as an officer of the mine-sweeper, 
"Kapuskasing", 

« * # « ♦ 

Lieut.-Col. W. J. C. Stikeman, the Black Watch (R.H. 
R.) of Canada, was awarded the M.B.E. in June, 1944. 



FREED PRISONERS OF WAR 

It is with grateful hearts that we list the following 
Old Boys who have been freed from prison camps by the 
Allied Armies: 

Capt. T. L. Alexander, M.B.E. ('36-'39) Algonquin Regt. 
Capt. T. D. Archibald, ('28-'31) R.C.A. 
Flight Lieut. R. M. Johnson, ('33-'39) R.C.A.F. 
Lieut. T. B. King ('28-'31), Kent Regt. 
Major H. D. F. Lazier, ('19-'21) R.H.L.I. 
Flight Lieut. R. F. McBride, ('34-'36) R.C.A.F. 
Major D. McCarthy, ('17-'18) R.C.A. 
Major R. E. McLaren, ('21-'25) R.H.L.I. (repatriated May, 

1944). 
Lieut. P. C. Osier, ('26-'34) P.P.C.L.I. 
Lieut. W. B. Reid, ('30-'34) 48th Highlanders of Canada. 
Flight Lieut. R. J. B. Renison, ('26-'29) R.A.F. 
Flight Lieut. P. K. Roper, ('27-'31) R.C.A.F. 
Lieut. Y. E. S. Ryerson, ('29-'32) Royal Regt. of Canada. 
Lieut. T. L. Taylor ('26-'32), Royal Regt. of Canada. 
Lieut. J. R. Vipond, ('33-'38) Irish Regt. 



64 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

WOUNDED 

Lieut. J. R. LeMesurier ('38-'42), R.C.A., on loan to 
the 5th Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, British Army, 
was wounded in action in Germany, March 25, 1945. Lieut. 
LeMesurier, previously wounded, February 11, 1945. when 
he suffered second degree burns of the face and bomb frag- 
ment wounds of the right arm and scalp, rejoined his unit 
in March. When wounded on March 25, he suffered in- 
juries which necessitated the amputation of his left leg, 
as well as a compound fracture of the lower right leg and 
a penetrating wound of the right arm. He was a patient 
in No. 17 Canadian General Hospital and was reported do- 
ing well April 7, 1945. As we go to press news has reached 
us that "Rosie" arrived back in Canada in May. 

***** 

Lieut. A. S. LeMesurier ('36-'39), 48th Highlanders of 
Canada, who was severely wounded in action in Italy, 
October 18, 1944, is a patient in a Convalescent Hospital 
in Colchester, England, March 29, 1945. 

***** 
Lieut. L. R. McLemon, D.S.C., ('33-'36), R.C.N.V.R., 
was wounded by the explosion of a Land-Mine, Western 
Europe, April 5, 1945. Lieut. McLemon, who won the 
D.S.C. in 1940 for gallantry in assisting the withdrawal of 
British troops from France, was reported recovering from 
his injuries in hospital in England, April 15, 1945. 

* * « * * 

Pte. W. N. A. Chipman ('40-'42), 1st Battalion, Black 
Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada, formerly Trooper, Canadian 
Armoured Corps, was wounded in action on the Western 
Front. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 65 

J. C. N. Currelly ('26-'28), Capt., 48th Highlanders, 
writes to say that a friend of his, Walter S. Hogg, Saska- 
toon Light Infantry, has been receiving cigarettes, letters 
from the Headmaster and the "Record" and has enjoyed 
all very much. However, he points out that due to a mix- 
up in mail and duplicity in names, his friend is not an Old 
Boy — not the W. S. Hogg ('11-'14) that we show on our 
records. 

***** 

George Caldbick ('40-'42), Pte., R.H.L.I., has seen 
Allan Charters ('40-'42). Royal Regt., who is in the same 
Brigade, several times. They have both seen action in 
Holland and Germany and George tells us that the civilians 
in Holland were most decent to them, 

# * # « « 

Lieut. Larry Higgins ('37-'42), R.C.N.V.R., and Ken 
Clark ('38-'39), are in the same group with the R.C.N.V.R. 

***** 

Fred Huycke ('37-'43), Gnr., R.C.A., has been in action 
in Holland and Belgium. He has had a letter from Colin 
Patch ('38-'41) saying he was recovering nicely from a 
bullet woimd in the foot. He saw John Butler ('40-'43), 
who was on his way to Italy with the R.A.C. Fred also 
says he has caught the odd glimpse of Major John Osier 
('22-'30), "who is not hard to identify". 

***** 

Sergt. Art McCrea ('27-'31). R.C.A.F.. writes from 
overseas to say that a good deal of the experience which 
has been of value to him in the service was gained at T.C.S. 

***** 

P. M. Russel ('35-'38), Lieut., D.Y.R.C. Hussars, was 
on course for three weeks in England before going into 
France as a movement control officer. On course with him 
was Johnny Rea ('37-'39), now transferred to infantry. 



65 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Capt. Gordon Lucas ('34-'36), R.C.A., has been acting 
as F.O.O. with the Infantry and from "somewhere in Ger- 
many" he writes in part: "We pushed into Germany in 
February close behind our shells and had some very bitter 
fighting. I then had a leave and got back with my unit 
in time for the crossing of the Rhine .... We joined in 
the mad dash to the North Sea. It was not all a picnic 
and the only part of the Gronigen welcome I can remember 
is a very accurately laid 20 mm. and small arms fire. It 
was a hot spot and we were not sorry to see another 
battalion push through our hard won bridgehead. I am 
now in Herman's front yard and it is quite easy to get 
accommodation. We have run across a great many freed 
Prisoners of War, who are trying to make their way home. 
Some Poles and Russians have been unbelievably ill treated 
and we have the unhappy task of maintaining law and 
order between the Prisoners of War and the Hun popula- 
tion". 

# * * * m 

Howard Patch ('35-'38), Bdr., R.C.A., visited John 
Waters ('39-'42), Les McLemon ('33-'36), in N.W. Europe 
this spring. 

JohnGreig ('40-'45), Pete Robson ('43-'45) and George 
Robarts ('42-'45) are all in the Alberni Division at H.M.C.S. 

Montcalm, Quebec. 

***** 

Bart Dalton ('38-'41), F/Q, R.C.A.F., writes to say 
that he did the rounds in London with Colin Patch ('33- 
'41), Graham Thomson ('36-'39) and John Higginbotham 
('39-'40). He also says that Bill Greene ('36-'41) is a pilot 
of one of the big Halifax bombers. 

***** 

Harry Scott ('32-'34), Capt., R.C.A.M.C, is serving 
with No. 17 Canadian General Hospital and reports on the 
convalescence of some of the Old Boys. Bill Speechley 
had a broken leg and was recovering rapidly. Harr>' tells 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 67 

US that Ross LeMesurier ('38-'42) was in his care for a 
short time and was particularly impressed with his good 
spirits, in spite of serious wounds. While on leave Harry 
met Owen Frederick ('33-'34) and "Dago" Knox ('30-'34). 
Dago had broken his glass eye and was wearing a black 
patch. This, topped off by the Glengarry, gave him "quite 
a piratical appearance", 

***** 
Sandy Pearson ('36-'40), Lieut., Calgary Highlanders, 
mentions that John Hayes ('35-'38) has left his Company 
to go as General Crerar's A.D.C. Bill WUls ('34-'39) is 
still the Signals Officer in Sandy's Regiment. 

* « * • * 

Colin Kerry ('38-'41), Gnr., R.C.A., has taken a short 
course and is now with the Educational Services, which he 
finds most interesting. Recently he has seen Sid Lambert 
('34-'43), Fred Huycke ('37-'43) and Dave Keefler ('39- 

'42). 

* # * * * 

Reg. Chown ('26-'31), Capt., R.C.A., writes: "I have 
seen John Coulson ('26-'30) still with the 48th Highlanders, 
and Major John Osier ('22-'30) recently and was surprised 
to learn that one of my assistants was at the School, ('34- 
'35) — Bud Crombie . , , , Along with the rest of 1 Corps, 
after nearly one and a half years in Italy, I am enjoying 
the more northern countries to the full. We all thought 
we had about reached Utopia on arriving in Belgium and 
even though we have moved into action, we find everything 
infinitely better than Italy". 

***** 

Harry Hyndman ('35-'37), Lieut,, R,C,N„ has return- 
ed from six years at sea. In that time he has seen service 
on H,M.S, "Hood" in the battle of Oran, was on H,M,S. 
"Nelson" when she was torpedoed, and did convoy duty 
from Gibraltar to Malta when the fighting was heaviest. 



68 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

E. D. K. Martin ('31-'35), F/O, R.C.A.F., is doing 
technical radio maintenance work in England. 



Graham Sneath ('41-'42), Sub-Lieut., R.N.V.R., is on 
H.M.S. "Bayfleur" and enjoying the Navy way very much. 
He seems to be living on "bananas, oranges and sunshine". 
Before leaving England he saw Reg. Dewar ('39-'43) at 
Cambridge and also Mike Reford ('40-'42), who is going to 
take a scholarship at Oxford when his time with the Fleet 
Air Arm is finished. Graham hopes to get into some 
Psychiatry work "apres la guerre". 

* * * * # 

John Osier ('22-'30), Major, R.C.A., was taken ill in 
Italy with jaundice and malaria on November 8, 1944. On 
his leaving hospital on December 18, he spent Christmas 
with his regiment and then had a v/eek's leave in Rome and 
Florence. When he rejoined his outfit he was made 2-1/c 
"a nice change, though one does not work with the men as 

much". 

* * « * « 

Charlie Seagram ('29-'36), Lieut., 48th Highlanders, 
is now transport officer of that regiment and while he is 
enjoying the work, he finds it quite difficult to keep all 
vehicles on the road. We can imagine "Uk" will figure 
some scientific approach to the problem and the work will 
be done with his usual thoroughness. 

* • « • * 

Con Harrington ('26-'30), Major, R.C.A. has been 
serving with the 48th Highlanders since Sicily and has 
had many cheery evenings with George Renison ('33-'38) 
and Bill "Abe" Leadbeater ('28-'34) gossiping about the 
School. He heard from John Kerrigan ('29-'33), who is in 
Western Europe. He also hears that his brother, Eric 
Harrington ('28-'31), took part in the sinking of a German 
submarine while on board his ship the "Sea Cliff". 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 69 

Major D. K. Parr, R.C.O.C, is now Camp Commandant. 
Arnprior Military Camp. 



Tony German ('37-'42) has been assigned to courses 
in England and had the good fortune to spend a short time 
at home on his way there from Australia. He recently 
visited the Naval College and reports that David Common 
('41-'43) and Mike Phillips ('41-'43) were in the boxing 
finals. Tony will soon be an acting Sub-Lieutenant and 
will be confirmed in the rank on completion of his six 
months course in England. 

* * # * * 

Dal Russel ('26-'34), Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F., has re- 
cently been home on leave from duties in Western Europe. 
Dal had a great deal to do with the destruction of many 
German jet propelled planes. 

* * * * * 

Ian Tate ('34-'41), Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., tells of 
seeing the following Old Boys at Halifax with the Navy, 
while on leave: Wally Duggan ('37-'41), Ken Scott ('40- 
'43) now at sea, Pat Hare ('40-'42) who is taking a four 
months navigation course at Kings, Wee Willie Balfour 
('37-'39), St. Clair Balfour ('22-'27) and Pete Stanger 

('40-'41). 

***** 

Dave Ambrose ('29-'33), F/L, R.C.A.F., is Flymg Con- 
trol Oflicer with a wing of the Tactical Air Force. His 
wing was the first to set up an air strip in Normandy and 
Dave says they were most fortunate to be led by Dal Rus- 
sel. Also with his wing as Army Liaison Oflicer is Major 
Frank Nobbs ('27-'29). Dave has been keeping a sharp 
lookout for familiar faces and has spoken to Al Staunton 
('27-'31), Ian Waldie ('28-'34), Bill Braden ('29-'33) and 
Bas Southam ('28-'36). Bill Braden is now back in Canada. 



70 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Peter Mulholland ('16-'22), Major, R.C.A., has left 
R.M.C. and is now serving as Administration Officer at No. 

2 C.A.R.U. 

# * * * * 

R. S. Wniiams ('27-'31), Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. V.R., is 
now 0/C H.M.C.S. "Saskatoon" and was transferred from 
H.M.C.S. "Shawinigan" just prior to her being lost with 
all hands. During his time on convoy duty for three years 
not one ship has been lost through submarine action, 
though a number of U-boats have been "scared off". 

* # # * « 

David Jellett ('37-'42), Mids., R.C.N., is now on H.M.S. 
"Devonshire". 

Ian Waldie ('28-'34), Lieut., Q.O.R.C, does not want 
to be "quoted" but has bumped into quite a few Old Boys 
in England, among them: Pete O'Brian ('28-'32), Major 
Boulden, George Somers ('23-'28) Paymaster of his Unit, 
Al Staunton ('27-'31), Jock Spragge ('18-'24), John Ker- 
rigan ('29-'33). lan's Little Big Four training seems to 
have set him up fairly well for all this "bumping into". 

***** 

Bill Fleming ('39-'42), Sergt., R.C.A.F., went over on 
the same ship with Arch. Humble and has recently seen 
Bob Kovacs ('39-'41) while stationed at Bournemouth. 

« • * • * 

W. R. Duggan ('37-'41), Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., is now in 
command of his own ship — Motor Launch 112 and is very 
proud of both the command and the crew. He has played 
quite a bit of squash with Arch Jones ('35-'41) and Pete 

Armour ('38-'41). 

• • • • • 

Nels Stewart ('38-'44), N.A.2, R.N.A.S., F.A.A.. is 
waiting at Gosport, England, for a chance at an observers' 
course. He has seen a greait many Old Boys near his sta- 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 71 

tion and in London, amongst whom were — Ian Macdonald 
('39-'43), who is waiting to go on course, Jack Gourlay 
('37-'43) and Ford Jones ('36-'44), now on a deck com- 
mission course. At the same station are Ian Murray ('38- 
'43), Gordon Gwynne-Timothy, Mike Reford ('40-'42), and 
"Dago" Speirs ('37-'43). Also seen were Jim Thompson 
('40-'42), Colin Patch ('33-'41) and Dave Keefler ('39-'42). 



Blake "Dago" Knox ('30-'34), Lieut., the Black Watch, 
writes: "It seems to me that I ran into more Old Boys in 
Normandy, Belgium and Holland than even in training 
days — especially so in our divisional area. The most sur- 
prising encounter was when we were holding a position 
outside Dunkirk and Johnny Popham (same CompanjO 
('28-'29) and I discovered we were confreres of Port Hope. 
Needless to say those in the near vicinity were unwittingly 
regaled for the next hour or two with mystifying reference 
to "Didnay", "Bigside", "Hard Andy" and the well known 
creek beloved by all former Trinity outlaws. The language 
used by Blake sounds little like that formerly used by 
'Dago'." We were pleased that Blake has almost completely 
recovered from the wound that cost him an eye. 



Al Wheeler ('41-'43, A/B, R.C.N.V.R., is stationed at 
St. John's on the H.M.C.S. "Atholl". 

***** 

Sid Lambert ('34-'43), Pte., Indian Army, seems to 

have had some real experiences since leaving School what 

with the Fleet Air Arm, washing dishes, skipping classes. 
and then joining the "Queens". While at Lee-On-Solent he 
met Froggy Symons ('38-'43), Acton Fleming ('30-'35), 
who had an R.A.F. group doing naval spotting. Bill Mathers 
('40-'42), and Dave Brooks ('41-'43). Sid was transferred 
from the Fleet Air Arm early in July, 1944, joined the 
Indian Army the 15th July, and is now through a very in- 



72 TRINITY COI^LEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

tensive training period and in India, enjoying the Army 
very much better than the Navy. 

***** 

Tommy Seagram ('34-'39), Lieut, R.C.N.V.R.. met 
Jack Sylvester ('36-'37) in London, who was on course be- 
fore returning to France. Tom has also met Harry Little 
('29-'32), Surgeon Lieutenant on H.M.C.S. "Niobe", D. E. 
Jemmett ('26-'30) on H.M.C.S. "Haida" and Ed. Cayley 
('33-'39) on the H.M.S. "Trepasser". Tommy has put on 
quite a bit of weight and doubts if he could make it up 
the School hill. (He could scarcely make it when he was 
at School). 

***** 

Charles N. Wynn (Ex-Master) now Lieut.-Cmdr., R. 
N.V.R., H.M. Naval Office I, Colombo, recently met Lieut.- 
Col. Hiscocks (also Ex-Master). 

***** 

Rid. Doolittle ('27-'32), F/L, R.C.A.F., has retired to 
the Reserve and is now employed with the Queenston 
Quarries Limited, Niagara Falls, Ontario. 

***** 

L/Cpl. E. L. Dillane ('20-'22), R.C.A.M.C, is quoted 
in the "Beeton World" from a letter written about the use 
of blood plasma for wounded men. Lister is serving in 
Belgium and writes in part: "I want to make it very plain 
that hundreds of lives have been saved in our unit alone 
by this means. The saving of these lives would not be 
possible were it not for the people at home in Canada and 
England who are donating their blood, and for the splen- 
did organization that processes and delivers it We 

are where the work is being done, but you are giving us 
the means by which it can be done. There is no greater 
satisfaction possible than to see a man, who an hour and 
a half ago was at death's door, talking and smoking with 
you It is a great work, and a work in which we all 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 73 

have a part — you do the ground work and I see the won- 
derful results." 

* « « * « 

F. S. Lewin ('38-'41), Cpl., R.C.A.S.C, has been de- 
mobilized because of eye trouble and is now at McGill Uni- 
versity studying Science. 

Lieut-Cmdr. Colin Brown ('27-'31), R.C.N.V.R., has 
been appointed Sports Officer for the Newfoundland Com- 
mand. For some time now Colin has been roving Sports 
Officer in the English Coastal Ports organizing recrea- 
tional activities for the boys in the Navy. 

* * * * * 

John McCaughey ('40-'41), Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., is now 
at H.M.C.S. "Protector", Sydney, N.S., as Berthing Officer. 

***** 

C. L. Ingles ('23-'28), Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F., recently 
graduated at the top of his class on a pilots' course at 
Hagersville, No. 16 S.F.T.S. This course consisted of many 
men who had done tours of operations as navigators and 

wireless air gunners. 

***** 

Lieut. Archie Jones ('35-'41), R.C.N.V.R., writes from 
H.M.C.S. Timmins. c/o Fleet Fail Office, Halifax, N.S., on 
May 10, that he ran into John Duncanson ('33-'41), Wally 
Duggan ('37-'41) and Ian Tate ('34-'41) in St. John's. 
Archie sent a $10.00 contribution and also wished the 

Cricket Team good luck. 

***** 

Sergt. G. L. Wilkinson ('41-'43), R.C.A.F., was in civi- 
lian reserve for two months, was suddenly sent overseas, 
and is now stationed on the South Coast of England. He 
went over on the same ship as Ken Scott ('40-'43) and 
Tony German ('37-'42). 



74 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Tim Blaiklock ('39-'42), A.B., R.C.N.V.R., is in a Cana- 
dian M.T.B. Flotilla on the other side. 



"Froggie" Symons ('38-'43), A/LA, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.) 
writes from 14 S.F.T.S., Kingston: "Dave Brooks ('41-'43) 
just left Kingston plus his wings and a promotion to A/PO, 
going to Moncton, N.B., and then United Kingdom". Bill 
Mathers ('40-'42) and Mike Keegan ('39-'40), also Fleet 
Air Arm, are at Kingston. "Froggie" has another few 
weeks at Kingston before following Brooks. Mathers and 
Keegan each have about three months to go in Kingston. 

Lieut.-Cmdr. J. Gordon King ('20-'26), U.S.N.R., is 
stationed in San Francisco, California, where he is the Act- 
ing Officer in Charge of 101 uptown machine-shops in the 
possession of the U.S. Navy Department. 

***** 

Capt. David Law ('28-'31) formerly Adjutant of 1st 
Battalion, Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada, who was 
wounded in action, November 25, 1944, and later recovered 
in No. 17 Canadian General Hospital in England, was 
among the invalided officers from overseas who arrived in 
Montreal, AprU 10, 1945. 

• • * • • 

Lieut. A. V. L. Mills ('29-'35), the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada, who was wounded in action in Holland, 
October 13, 1944, has recovered from his injuries and is 
now serving at H.Q., Canadian Reinforcement Units, Eng- 
land. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 75 

OLD BOYS' NOTES— II 

Colin Scott ('42-'45) has arrived safely in England 
after a rather dreary trip on a banana boat. He plans to 
go to Repton in May, but says that no school will take the 

place of T.C.S. 

* * * * # 

Joe de Pencier ('15-'16) is National Chairman of the 
War Savings Stamp Committee. 

* * * * * 

F L Gerald Dixon (Master), R.C.A.F., Assistant Com- 
mand Cadet OflScer, Montreal, has now retired from Active 
Service in the R.C.A.F. and is engaged as Campaign Secre- 
tary in the work of the McGill War Memorial Campaign. 
H. H. Stikeman ('26-'31) is Campaign Representative in 
Ottawa. 

***** 

J. R. del Rio ('39-'41) is in Mexico City with 20th. 
Century Fox, translating scripts from English to Spanish. 

***** 

Amongst visitors at the School since Easter were; 
A.B. J. K. Parr ('31-'41), P. E. Britton ('37-'44), D. M. 
Saunderson ('40-'44), G. C. Curtis ('40-'44), R. V. LeSueur 
('40-'44), J. M. Holton ('38-'44), Ord/Smn. D. W. Morgan 
('41-'44), Rev. E. M. Dann, Colonel Ewart Osborne ('92- 
'95), R. P. Jellett ('92-'97), Major E. A. Hethrington ('02- 
'06), S. B. B. Saunders ('16-'20), Major A. A. Duncanson 
('26-'32), Major H. E. Irwin ('26-'31). Sergt. R. E. Day 
('41-'44), Pte. C. A. Q. Bovey ('41-'44), Ord/Smn. L. D. 
Clarke ('40-'43), D. C. Higginbotham ('39-'44), F/L J. B. 
Cleveland, D.F.C. ('29-'33), A.B. R. T. Morris ('33-'44). 
Pte. F. B. Michael ('39-'44), J. P. Ingham ('42-'44), Rev. 
T. P. Crosthwait ('17-'20), Pte. P. H. Mclntyre ('42-'45), 
F/L P. A. McFarlane, D.F.C. ('31-'36), Capt. F. E. Cochran 
('28-'35), Lieut.-Col. N. Kingsmill ('20-'25), G. S. Osier 
(•16-'23), 2nd Lieut. J. B. I. Sutherland ('39-'42), M. B. 



i 



76 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Sutherland ('42-'44), Capt. J. L. ff. Jemmett ('34-'39), Tpr. 
E. M. Parker ('38-'44), Tpr. J. A. Beament ('37-'44), Col. 
J. W. Langmuir ('06-'07), A.B. D. M. Blaiklock ('39-'42), 
Ord/Smn. G. B. Rutherford ('42-'44), A.C.2 R. B. Nicol 
('41-'44), 2nd Lieut. D. M. Culver ('39-'41), W/0 L. D. 
Erenhous ('38-'40), Sergt. E. H. N. Lambert ('34-'38), 
Lieut. E. G. Finley ('33-'40), Lieut. W. R. Wright, D.S.C. 
('30-'32), Gordon Ince ('12-'16), O. T. C. Jones ('39-'44), 
G. F. Crum ('38-'42), Capt. P. D. Bankier ('28-'35), Major 
D. W. McLean, M.C. ('27-'30), P/0 J. W. Barnett ('38-'42). 
***** 

Congratulations to C. E. Lyall ('37-'41) on winning 
the American Society of Heating and Ventilating En- 
gineers' Prize in Fourth year Engineering Course at the 
University of Toronto and also completing his year. 

***** 

Passed First Year: Civil Eng. — G. H. Curtis (one 
sup) ; Mech. Eng. — J. L. MacLaren (honours) ; P. E. Brit- 
ton (one sup) ; J. M. Holton (two sups) ; Chem. Eng. — R. 
V. LeSueur; D. M. Saunderson (two sups). 

***** 

Dr. Edward Keefer ('29-'35) who graduated from Mc- 
Gill Medical School is assistant in surgery at the Peter 
Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. 



BIRTHS 

Capreol— On February 1, 1945, at the Toronto General Hos- 
pital, Private Patients' Pavilion, to Mr. and Mrs. Cyril 
L. Capreol ('15-'18), a daughter. 

Crosthwait— On May 13, 1945, at the Port Hope Hospital, 
to the Rev. and Mrs. Terence P. Crosthwait ('17-'20), a 
son. 



78 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Keefer — On May 16, 1945, at Morrestown, N.J., to Dr. and 
Mrs. Edward B. C. Keefer ('29-'35), a son. 



MARRIAGES 

Draper — Wickham — On April 11, 1945, in Belfast, Ireland, 
Flight Lieutenant John William Patterson Draper, D.F.C. 
('40-'41), R.C.A.F., to Miss Henrietta Mary Wickham of 
Ashdene, Comber, Belfast. 

Russel — ^Dolsen — In December, 1944, in England, Lieu- 
tenant Percival Molson Russel ('35-'38), D.Y.R.C. Hus- 
sars, to Nursing Sister Lieutenant E. Susan Dolsen. 

Wilkinson — McMillan — On March 25, 1945, in Windsor, 
Ontario, Sergeant George Lawrence Wilkinson ('41-'43), 
R.C.A.F., to Miss Joy McMillan, of Port Hope. 



DEATHS 

Hugel — On March 10, 1944, at Toronto, Lieut.-Colonel Nor- 
man Grey Hugel (73-'81). 

McLaren — On April 16, 1945, at Hamilton, Henry Evatt 
McLaren ('84-'89). 



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began — that is, with nothing." 
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Founded in 1817 



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CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 

COST INSTALLATIONS, 
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Henry J. Welch, F.C.A. Charles R. Welch, B.A., C.A. 
S. A. Morrison, C.A. Hugh C. Anderson, C.A., CJ*~A- 

59 YONGE ST. TORONTO 1. 



Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. 

FOUNDED 1865 

Head Master 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge; B.A., Trinity 

College, Toronto; B.Paed., Toronto. St. Mark's School, Southborough, 

Mass., 1929-1933. (1933) 

House Masters 
C. Scorr, Esq., London University. (Formerly Headmaster of King's College 

School, Windsor). (1934) 
R. G. S. Maier, Esq., B.A., Harvard; University of Paris; Cornell University. (1936) 

Chaplain 
The Rev. E. R. Bagley, M.A., St. Peter's Hall, Oxford; Ridley Hall, Cambridge. 
(1944). 

Assistant Masters 

CoL. H. V. DB Bury, C.B.E., Royal Military College, Kingston, 1905-10; Stoney- 

hurst College, England. (1943) 

F. P. Grhgowis, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; University of London; University 

of Romu; B.Ph.; Ph.L. (1943) 

G. R. Gwynne-Timothy, Esq., B.A., Jesus College, Oxford. (1944). 

G. .A. i liLL, Esq., 13. A., University College, Toronto; Ontario College of Education. 

(1942)^ 
A. B. HooGEi'is, Esq., B.A., Unlvcir.itv of Toronto; University of Wisconsin. 

(1942) 
A 13. Key, Esq., B.A., Queen's University; Ontario College of Education. (1943) 
P. H. Lfwis, Esq., M.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. (1922) 
W. K. MoLSON, Esq., B.A., WcGili University. (Jan. 1942) 
A. C. Morris, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N.S. (1921) 
A. H. N. Snei.grove, Esq., Mount Allison University. (1942) 
R. Thompson, \zSi)., M.A., St. Catherine's College, Cambridge; Santander. (1942) 
A. E. White, Esq., M.A., McMaster University. (Jan. 1945). 

Tutor 
LiBur.CoL. K. L. Stevenson, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. (1930) 

Visiting Masters 

Edmund Cohu, Esq Music 

S J. DoLFN, Esq., Mus. Bac Music 

J. W. Kerr, Esq Basketball, Trade 

J. W. Wilson Cricket 

Phydcal Instructor for both Schools 
Captain S. J. Bath, Royal Fusiliers; formerly Physical Instrurtor at R.M.C., 
Kingston, Ontario. (1921) 

THE JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Prtricif>at 

C. J. Tottenham, Esq., B.A., Queen's University, Kingston. (1937) 

A tfistant Matters 
H. G. Jambs, Esq., Leeds University. (1922). 

J. D. Burns, Esq., University of Toronto, Normal School, Toronto. (1943). 
Mrs. Cecil Moore, Normal School, Peterborough. (1942). 

D. W. Morris, Esq.. Normal School, London. (1944). 

H. C. Swallow, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto. (1944). 



Bursar G. C. Temple, Esq. 

Physician R. McDerment, Esq., M.D 

Nurse Miss Rhea Pick, R.N. 

Dietitian Mrs. J. F. Wilkin 

Matron (Senior School ) Mrs. G. R. Gwynne-Timothy 

Nurse-Matron (Junior School) Mrs. G. Sturgeon, R.N. 

Dietitian (Junior School ) Mrs. D. M. Crowp 

Secretary Miss E. M. Gregory 



SCHOOL DIRECTORY 

PREFECTS 

E. J. M. Huycke (Head Prefect), P. C. Dobell, H. C. D. Cox, J. M. Irwin, 

E. Howard, H. French, E. McC. Sinclair. 

HOUSE PREFECTS 
G. P. Vernon, G. A. H. Pearson, T. McC. Wade, J. R. McMurrich. 

SENIORS 

H. C. Butterfield, D. A. Davidson, G. C. Bovaird, J. N. Matthews, J. K. P. Allen, 

D. A. Decker, D. H. Wilson, D. H. Roenisch, V. Dawson, W. G. Phippen, 

R. A. Hope, P. C. Stratford, G. N. McD. Currie, P. L. Gilbert, 

R. C. Paterson, J. G. Gibson, R. M. Kirkpatrick. 

HOUSE OFFICERS 
Bbthune — F. A. H. Greenwood, S. C. Edmonds, W. J. A. Toole, J. R. Ligertwood, 

W. N. Conyers, K. C. Lambert, W. J. Brewer. 
Brent— R. V. S. Smith, W. G. McDougall, P. A. Richardson, E. E. Gibson, 
C. W. Long, J. C. Barber, P. M. Bird, W. D Wigle, F. J. Main, 
J. G. Gordon, F. D. Malloch, R. P. Stokes, D. M. O'Grady. 

SCHOOL COUNCIL 
The Headmaster, 3 Prefects 
VI Scholarship — Pearson i (French i) VC — Hardaker. 

VIA— Vernon (Sindair) IVA (1)— French u (McDowell) 

Vm— Howard (Hope) IVA (2)— McPherson (Jarvis) 

VA — Greenwood (MdDougall) IVB — Fennell (Wismer) 

VB— O'Grady (Crowe) IIIA— Hall (Rogers) 

IIIB— Spencer (Pilcher) 

CHAPEL 

Head Sacristan — J. G. Gordon 

Sacristans 

I. B. Campbell, G. R. Campbell, W. A. Curtis, V. Dawson, H, A. Hyde, 

J. M. Hallward, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, R. W. S. Robertson, 

D. H. Roenisch, T. McC. Wade, R. L. Watts. 

CRICKET TRACK 

Captain— U. C. D. Cox. Captain— P. C. Dobell. 

Vice-Captain — E. Howard. 

SWIMMING GYM. 

Captain — E. J. M. Huycke. Captain — D. M. O'Grady. 

Vice-Captain — E. McC. Sinclair. Vice-Captain — J, G. Gibson. 

THE LIBRARY 

Librarian — G. D. White; Assistant — H. A. Lamb 

Carnegie Room — J. R. Ligertwood, W. D. Wigle 

Used Book Room — I. B. Campbell, R. W. S. Robertson 

Lights Boys — H. P. Goodbody, P. L. Goering, R. M. Merry 



Corporation of 
Trinity College School 

VISITOR: 
His Grace rHB Archbishop of Toronto and Primatb of All Canada. 
GOVERNING BODY 
Ex-Officio Members 

The Chancellor of Trinity University. 

The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College. 

P. A. C. Ketchum, Esq., M.A., B.Paed., Headmaster. 

Elected Members 

The Hon. Mr. Justice R. M. Dennistoun, C.B.E., V.D., B.A., LL.D Winnipeg 

Robert P. Jellett, Esq Montreal 

G. B. Strathy, Esq., K.C., M.A Toronto 

Norman Seagram, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. Senator G. H. Bamard, K.C Victoria, B.C. 

Col. J. W. Langmuir, M.B.E., V.D Toronto 

Capt. Colin M. Russell Montreal 

J. H. Lithgow, Esq Toronto 

A. E. Jukes, Esq Vancouver, B.C. 

Col. H. C. Osborne, C.M.G., C.B.E., V.D., M.A Ottawa 

Hugh F. Labatt, Esq London, Ont. 

F. G. Mathers, Esq., B.A., LL.B Winnipeg 

Major B. M. Osier Toronto 

J. Bruce Mackinnon, Esq Toronto 

The Hon. R. C. Matthews, P.C, B.A Toronto 

Wing Commander Charles Bums Toronto 

The Right Rev. R. J. Renison, M.A., D.D Iroquois Falls, Ont. 

Admiral Percy W. Nelles, C.B., R.C.N Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. J. Ewart Osborne, D.S.O., V.D., B.Sc Toronto 

Air Marshal W. A. Bishop, V.C, C.B., D.S.O., M.C., D.F.C., LL.D Ottawa 

Lieut.-Col. Gerald W. Birks, O.B.E Mom.-eal 

J. D. Johnson, Esq Montreal 

Major W. M. Pearce, M.C Toronto 

G. Meredith Huycke, Esq., K.C, B.A Toronto 

S. S. DuMoulin, Esq Hamilton 

Argue ."' lartin, Esq., K.C I lamilton 

T. W. Seagram, Esq Waterloo, Ont. 

Gernld Larkin, Esq Toronto 

R. V. LeSucur, Esq., X.C., B.A Toronto 

Wilder G. Penfield, C.M.G., M.D., D.S.C., D.C.L., F.R.S., F.R.C.S Montreal 

Captain Strachan Ince, D.S.C Toronto 

G S. Osier, Esq •• Toronto 

Appointed by Trinity College 
The Hon. Mr. Justice P. H. Gordon, C.B.E., K.C, M.A., LL.D., B.C.L. 
Elected by the Old Boys 

P. A. DuMoulin, Esq London, Ont. 

Capt. P. G. Campbell, M.C Toronto 

Major H. L. Symons, H.D Toronto 



Trinity College School Record 



VOL. 48, NO. 6. AUGUST, 1945. 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Active Service List 

Editorial 1 

In Memoriam — 

J. D. Butler 4 

A. G. Byers 5 

L B. Croll 6 

J. A. C. Duncan 7 

M. W. Gibson 8 

J. R. Grant 9 

H. K. McAvity 9 

R. D. McLaren, D.F.C 10 

A. B. Moore 12 

W. L. C. White 13 

F. E. Wigle, O.B.E., D.S.0 13 

A. B. Wilkes 16 

Chapel Notes 17 

School Notes — 

Gifts to the School 21 

T.C.S. in the West 22 

Music in the School 27 

Report from the High School Inspertor 29 

The Hockey Dinner 30 

The Leaving Dinner 31 

A Tribute to the Late Rev. H. F. Hamilton 33 

Dinner for the Provost 34 

Honours at the University of Toronto 34 

The Headmaster's Report 37 

Valedictory Address 44 

Senior School Prizes 47 

Old Boys in the War 57 

Some War Time Statistics 61 

Contributions — 

Victory in Eurof)e 64 

Indecision 65 

Some Slections from Previous War Numbers of the Record 68 

Cricket 120 

Sports Day 126 

Junior School Record 131 

Olde Boys Notes — 

I — On Aaive Service 142 

Old Boys' Notes— II. 159 

Birth, Marriages and Deaths 166 



Prayer in Use in the Chapel for Old Boys 
on Active Service 

O Almighty God, who art wiser than the 
children of men and overrulest all things to their 
good, hold, we beseech Thee, in Thy keeping all 
ivho have gone forth to battle for our cause, 
especially those from this School: watch over 
those that are missing: comfort afid protect those 
in the hands of the enemy. Be with them in the 
hour of danger, strengthen them in the hour of 
weakness, sustain and comfort them in the hour 
of sickness or of death. Grant that they may be 
true to their calling and true always to Thee, 
and make both them and us to be strong to do our 
duty in Thy service, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. 

ACTIVE SERVICE LIST 

1941-42 ABRAHAM, J. A., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1935-36 ADAMS, R. C, Sergt., R.C.A. 

1935- ADAMS, S. M, F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1925-26 AHEARN, T. T., F/O, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1928-35 ALDEN, J., A.C.I, R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 ALEXANDER, T. L., M.B.E., Capt., Algonquin 

Regt. (freed P.O.W.). 
1929-35 ALLAN, M. B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1929-33 AMBROSE, D. R., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1931-34 AMBROSE, P. J., Pte., Infantry Corps. 
1927-32 AMBROSE, S. H., Lieut., R.C.O.C. 
1937-40 ANDERSON, F. S., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 
1925-34 ANNESLEY, J. C. L., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 
1932-35 ARCHBOLD, G. J. D., R.N.V.R. 
1921-23 ARCHIBALD, B. M., O.B.E., D.S.O., Brigadier, 

R.E. 
1925-27 ARCHIBALD, C. R., Major, R.C.A. 
1924-28 ARCHIBALD, R. L., Major, the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1928-31 ARCHIBALD, T. D., Captain, R.C.A. (freed 

P.O.W.). 



tl922-27 ARDAGH, A. P., Lieut.-Col., B.C., Dragoons 
(Killed in Action). 

1938-40 ARMOUR, D. E. P., Capt., R.C.A. 

1906-10 ARMOUR, E. B. P., Colonel, R.C.A. (demob.) 

1938-41 ARMOUR, P. G. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1924-32 ARMOUR, W. E., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 

1929-37 ARMSTRONG. D. H., A.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1923-24 ARNOLD, J. P., Capt., N.D.H.Q. 

tl933-35 ATKIN, J. W., P/O, R.C.A.F. (KUled on Active 
Service) . 

1939-42 ATKIN, R. H., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1911-12 ATWOOD, J. P. C, Major, Armoured Corps. 

1941-45 AUSTIN, J. B., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1939-42 AUSTIN, J. McN., Sergt.-PUot, R.C.A.F. 

1937-39 AVERY, J. R., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1930-33 BAILLIE, J. F., Major, the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada, 

1909-12 BAKER. C. E., Capt., R.C.A. (demob.). 

1914-19 BAKER, M. H., Major, R.C.O.C. 

1922-27 BALDWIN, W. K. W., M.B.E., Capt., Toronto 
Scottish Regt. (M.G.). 

1930-31 BALDWIN, W. W., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1922-27 BALFOUR, St.C, D.S.C., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1937-39 BALFOUR, W. S., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1925-31 BAND, J. T., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1942-44 BANISTER, P. G. McC, Cadet, R.C.N. 

1929-35 BANKIER, P. D., Capt., R.C.A. 

1941-44 BANNISTER, K. H., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1930-31 BARNES, R. E., Capt., R.C.A. 

1938-42 BARNETT, J. W., P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1920-22 BARROW, F. B., Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1937-38 BEAIRSTO, W. H., Lieut., Wmnipeg Grena- 
diers. 

1937-44 BEAMENT, J. A. Tpr., Armoured Corps. 

1936-39 BEARDSHAW, R. F., S.P.O., R.C.N. 

1935-38 BEATTY, R. P., Trp/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1919-27 BEATTY, W. L., Major, 48th Highlanders of 
Canada. 

1926-32 BECK, B. H. deB., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1934-37 BEDDOE, A. C, F/0, R.C.A.F. 

n 



1942-43 BEDORE, G. E., Sub-Lieut., R.N.F.A.A. 

1941-43 BEEMAN, W. J. M., Pte., C.P.T.C. 

1924-27 BELL, J. T., Major, R.H.L.L 

1938-41 BERKINSHAW, W. R., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1940-41 BERRY, L. R., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 BEST, G. H., Lieut, R.C.E. 

1918 BETHUNE, A. C, A/Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1905-10 BETHUNE, R. T., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1910-14 BETHUNE, W. D., L/Cpl., R.C.E. (demob.). 

19^2-35 BEVAN, K. W. A., D.F.C., Lieut., U.S. Army 

Air Corps. 

1921-27 BIGGAR, H. T., Capt, R.C.A.S.C. 

tl929-34 BILKEY, J. D., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (Killed on 

Active Service). 

1921-23 BINGHAM, C. S. K., Lieut., 4th P.L.D.G. 

1939-42 BIRKS, R. I., Lieut., R.N. 

1941-43 BLACK, E. P., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

tl931-37 BLACK, W. A., A.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Killed 

in Action). 

1936-40 BLACK, W. B., F/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1919-24 BLAIKIE, G. R., M.B.E., Major, R.C.A. 

1939-42 BLAIKLOCK, D. M., A.B., R.C.N. 

1938-41 BOGGS, J. D., Jr. W/0, Merchant Navy. 

1920-21 BONNYCASTLE, C. H., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-32 BONNYCASTLE, G. F., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1919-26 BOONE, G. L., M.B.E., E.D., Lieut.-Col., 48th 

Highlanders of Canada. 

1919-20 BOSTOCK, W. N., C.B.E.. Brigadier, R.C.E. 

Master BOULDEN, C. H., M.B.E., Chaplain & Hon. 

Major, C.M.H.Q. 

1920-28 BOULTON, W. O. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1941-44 BOVEY, C. A. Q., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

Master BOWERS, H., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1937-40 BOWMAN, M. C. D., M.C., Lieut., Royal Can. 

Regiment. 

1940-42 BOWMAN, S. J., Gdsm., Armoured Corps. 

1905-07 BOYCE, C. D., Major, C.A.T.C. 

Master BRACK. C. F., Lieut., R.A. 

1929-33 BRADEN, W. G., Major, R.C.E.M.E. 

m 



1923-26 BRAIN, R. T. F, M.C., Chaplain and Hon. 
Capt., S.D. & G. Highlanders. 

1928-31 BRAINERD, T. C, Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1923-28 BRIDGER, J. R., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1928-33 BRIDGER, N. C, Capt., American Fid. Service. 

1937-44 BRITTON, P. E., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1941-43 BROOKS, D. A., A/PO, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 

1911-13 BROUGHALL, H. S., M.C., D.F.C., Grp. Capt., 
R.A.F. 

1912-13 BROUGHALL, J. H. S., M.B.E., E.D., Major, 
Irish Regt. of Canada. 

1927-32 BROUGHALL, W. H., M.B.E., Major, R.H.L.I. 

1927-31 BROVm, C. McC, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1927-32 BROWNE, A. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1917-19 BRUCE, A., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-33 BRUNTON, Sir E. F. L., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 

1937-39 BRYSON, J., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 

1933-37 BUCK, E. C, Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

1924-25 BUCK, J. H., Capt., R.C.A. 

1922-24 BUCK, W. M., Capt., R.C.A. 

1912-13 BULL, R. O., M.C., V.G. of C. (retired). 

1925-29 BUNTING, C. W., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 

1929-30 BUNTING, J. R., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1921-25 BURNS, C. F. W., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1938-40 BURROV\^S, C. A., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
tl940-43 BUTLER, J. D., Tpr., Armoured Corps (Killed 

in Action). 
tl928-31 BYERS, A. G., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed on Active Service). 

1926-30 BYERS, D. N., Major, R.C.A. 

1940-42 CALDBICK, G., Pte., R.H.L.I. 

1938-42 CALDWELL, T. A., Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. 

1917-19 CAMPBELL, A. P., C.B.E., Grp. Capt., R.A.F. 

1922-27 CAMPBELL, J. D. C, Major, R.C.O.C. 

1919 CAMPBELL, M. R., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1924-26 CAPE, J. M., M.B.E., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 
tl930-32 CARLING, L. I., Lieut., Royal Canadian Regt. 
(Killed in Action). 

1919-21 CAPREOL, J. H. D., Pte., R.C.O.C. 

1940-43 CARMICHAEL, D. G. O., Coder, R.N. 

IV 



tl920-26 CARTWRIGHT, G. S., F/0, R.C.A.F. (Killed 

in Action). 
1935-38 CARTWRIGHT, J. R. C., Sergt., R.C.A. 
1918-23 CASSELS, J. G., Major, R.C.A. 
1916-21 CASSELS, R. F., Sergt.-Instructor, R.C.A.F. 

(demob.). 
1926-33 CASSELS, W. P., Capt., R.C.O.C. (demob.). 
1931-34 CASSILS, M., Capt., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) 

of Canada. 
1927-36 CASTLE, G. V., Pte., U.S. Army. 
1925-30 CASTLE, J. H., Lieut.-Cmdr., U.S. Navy. 
1912-13 CATTO, J. M., E.D., Major, R.C.C.S. 
1938-42 CAWLEY, J. C, F/O, R.C.A.F. 
1942-44 CAWLEY, M. A., Gnr., R.C.A. 
1933-39 CAYLEY, E. C, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1916-20 CAYLEY, H. C, Capt., 48th Highlanders of 

Canada. 
1937-40 CAYLEY, P. H., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N. 
1931-34 CHADWICK, W. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. (de- 
mob.). 
1940-42 CHARRINGTON, G. A., Tpr., R.A.C. 
1940-42 CHARTERS, A. H., L/Cpl., Royal Regt. of 

Canada. 
1939-41 CHEYNEY. B. J. K., Sub-Lieut., R.N.F.A.A. 
1940-42 CHIPMAN, W. N. A., Pte., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1926-31 CHOWN, R. E., Capt, R.C.A. 
1938-39 CLARK, K. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1928-32 CLARKE. H. H., Major, Armoured Corps. 
1940-43 CLARKE, L. D., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 
1 1935-38 CLELAND, C. L., P/0, R.C.A.F. (Missing, 

Presumed Killed in Action). 
1928-30 CLELAND, D., S/L, R.C.A.F. 
1924-28 CLELAND, J. G., Capt. ,Toronto Scottish Regt. 
1926-30 CLELAND, W. M., Capt., Armoured Corps 

(demob.). 
1929-33 CLEVELAND, J. B., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

(demob.). 
1926-30 CLEVELAND, P. L., Capt., R.C.E. 
Master COATES, R. C, Lieut., R.N.V.R. 



1928-35 COCHRAN. F. E., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 
1 1926-32 COMBE. J. O.. Lieut.. Essex Scottish Regt. 
(Killed in Action). 
1941-43 COMMON, D. L., Cadet Capt., R.C.N. 
1911-13 COOK, T. R., Major. Canadian Forestry Corps 

(S.O.S.). 
1923-24 CORRIGALL, D. J., Major, P.P.C.L.I. 
1926-30 COULSON, J. F., Cpl., 48th Highlanders of 

Canada. 
1937-39 COULTIS, J. S., P.O., R.C.N.V.R. 
1921-22 COWAN. O. D., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 
+1924-30 COWPERTHWAITE, E. M., F/0, R.A.F. 

(Killed in Action). 
+ 1924-31 COWPERTHWAITE, L., F/0, R.C.A.F. (KUled 
in Action). 
1928-33 COX, J. C, A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
Master CRAKE, J. E. A., Lieut., the Lome Rifles 

(Scottish). 
1937-39 CRAWFORD, D. G., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
+1921-27 CROLL, I. B., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 
1910-18 CROLL, L. D., Lieut.-Col.. R.C.A.M.C. (demob.) 
1934-35 CROMBIE. M. G., Bdr., R.C.A. 
1926-30 CROSSEN. W. M.. Capt., R.C.O.C. 
1912-16 CRUICKSHANK. G., Capt., R.C.A. 
1932-33 CRUMP, W. R., Sgn., R.C.C.S. 
1939-41 CULVER. D. M.. 2nd Lieut., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1916-23 CUMBERLAND, L H., O.B.E., D.S.O., E.D., 

Brigadier, Armoured Corps. 
1921-25 CUMMINGS, W. F. A., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 
1917-18 CUNDILL, F. H., Capt., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1926-28 CURRELLY, J. C. N., Capt., 48th Highlanders 

of Canada. 
1933-38 CURTIS, E. H., Cpl., U.S. Army. 
1940-44 CURTIS, G. H., N.A.2, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 
1928-37 CUTTEN, J. E., Capt., R.C.A. 
1927-34 CUTTEN, W. H., P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1919-21 DALTON, C. F. R., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

VI 



1938-41 DALTON, W. B., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1937-42 DAVIDSON, I. J., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N. 

1933-36 DAVIS, N. C, Capt., R.C.A. 

1930-35 DAWES, D. K., Capt., R.C.A. 

1926-31 DAWSON, D. B., Capt., R.C.A. 

1941-44 DAY, R. E., Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. (Reserve) 

1923-26 DEFRIES, J. G., Capt., 48th Highlanders of 

Canada. 

1919-22 DELAHEY, F. C, F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1916-20 DeLOM, T. C. B., F/L, R.A.F. 

1938-42 DIGNAM, D. S., Cadet Officer, Can. Merchant 

Navy. 

1936-41 DIGNAM, H. R., F/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1920-22 DILLANE, E. L., L/Cpl., R.C.A.M.C. 

1920-22 DILLANE, J. E., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1923-24 DILLANE, R. G., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

Master DIXON, G. H., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1940-43 DODD, J. H. B., F/0, R.A.F. 

1927-32 DOOLITTLE, J. R., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1935-36 DOUGLAS, G. C, Major, R.C.O.C. 

1933-36 DOUGLAS, P. H., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1928 DOUGLAS, R. D., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1927-31 DOUGLAS, R. F., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1919-23 DOULL, A. K., Pay. Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1919-21 DOUPE, C. S., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1940-41 DRAPER, J. W. P., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1921-23 DUDLEY, E. J. S., Lieut.-Col., Sask. Lt. Infy. 

(S.O.S.) 

1927-29 DUFF, R. P., Sergt., R.C.A. 

1937-41 DUGGAN, R. B., Lieut, R.C.A. 

1937-41 DUGGAN, W. R., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-31 DUMARESQ, C. F., Lieut., P.P.C.L.I. 

1916-18 DUMBRILLE, J. C, Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1921-25 DuMOULIN, R. T., Major, R.C.A. 

1913-17 DUNBAR, A., Major, R.C.A. (demob.). 

1 1940-42 DUNCAN, J. A. C, Lieut., Grenadier Guards 

(Died of wounds received in Action). 

1926-32 DUNCANSON, A. A., Major, Royal Regt. of 

Canada. 

1933-41 DUNCANSON, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

VII 



1927-31 DYKES, C. P. J., Lieut,. R.C.E. 

1934-39 EARLE, G. A. P., P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1929-35 EDE, E. D., F/0, R.A.F. 

tl930-34 EDE. H. F. G., D.F.C., F/0. R.C.A.F. (Killed in 
Action) . 

Master EDWARDS, C. A. M., Sergt., Personnel Selec- 
tion Board, 

1910-12 EMERY, H. J., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. (demob.) 

1928-32 EMMANS, R. W., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1938-40 ERENHOUS, L. D., W.0.1, R.C.A.F. 

1936-39 EVANS, A. H., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1918-23 EVANS, J. H., Lieut., R.C.E. 

1918-25 EVANS, J. L., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1938-39 FAIRLIE, T. W., Lieut., R.C.O.C. (demob.). 

tl927-35 FERGUSON, A. McD., Lieut., Royal Can. Regt. 
(Killed in Action). 

1933-40 FINLEY, E. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1942-44 FISHER, J. P., Cadet Captain, R.C.N. 

1927-29 FISHER, R. A., Lieut., Royal Can. Regt. 

1908-12 FISKEN, S. F., M.C. & Bar, Lieut.-Col., R.A. 

1936-37 FLEET, E. G., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1930-38 FLEMING, A. S., Capt., Can. Field Security. 

1930-35 FLEMING, J. B. A., Wing Cmdr., R.A.F. 

1939-42 FLEMING, W. R., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1933-38 FLOCK, D. A., Lieut., C.A.T.C. (demob.). 

1930-34 FORTYE, R. A., Surg.-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1918-20 FOSTER, G. M. D., Lieut., Q.O.R.C. 

1921-24 ERASER, M. P., Group Capt., R.C.A.F. 

1933-34 FREDERICK, F. O., Capt., Can. Dental Corps. 

1941-44 FULFORD, G. T., Cadet, R.C.N. 

1938-39 FULLERTON, H. D., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1922-27 FYSHE, T. G., Major, R.C.A.M.C. 

1921-30 FYSHE, T. M., Capt., R.C.A. 

1920-23 GAISFORD, G., D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., R.A.C. 

1931-32 GALLOWAY, D. E., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1937-38 GARBUTT, D. F. B., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1920-21 GARDINER, A. T., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 

1923-28 GARDINER, O. E. S., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1937-42 GERMAN, A. B. C, Mids., R.C.N. 

1939-42 GIBBONS, M. A., Lieut., B.M.I. 

VIII 



1930-36 GIBSON, F. M., Lieut., R.C.A.P.C. 

tl925-30 GIBSON, M. W., S/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 

1936-39 GIFFEN, P. J., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1923-25 GILL, L. N., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1911-13 GILL, N. G., Capt., Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1942-45 GILLAN, C. A. W., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1924-29 GILMOUR, J. P., U.S. Merchant Marine. 

1927-29 GLASS, D. C, Sergt., R.C.A.P.C. 

1918-22 GLASSCO, A. E., Major, Indian Army. 

1920-26 GLASSCO, C. S., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

Master GLOVER, R. G., Capt., S.D. & G. Highlanders. 

1919-21 GODET, T. M. duB., Lieut., R.N.V.R. 

1941-43 GOERING, J. W. L., Corporal, Infantry Corps. 

1926-33 GODSHALL, H. L., Major, U.S. ArtUlery. 

1940-43 GOODALL, R. G. W., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

Master GOODDAY, C, Major, Armoured Corps (de- 
mob.). 

1942-43 GORDON, E. C, A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

tl922-25 GORDON, H. L., F/0, R.C.A.F. (Killed on 
Active Service). 

1909-11 GOSSAGE, B. F., M.C., Major, R.C.A. 

1913-17 GOSSAGE, G. M., Capt., Royal Regt. of Cana- 
da (demob.). 

1937-43 GOURLAY, J. N., N.A.2, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 

1920-22 GRANT, G., Major, R.C.C.S. 

1 1930-32 GRANT, J. R., S/L, R.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 

1929-32 GRANT, R. D., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1930-32 GRAYDON, A. S., Capt., Can. Fusiliers (M.G.). 

1938-39 GREENE, M. D., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1936-41 GREENE, W. E., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1929-31 GREER, J. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1940-45 GREIG, J. G., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-32 GRIER, A. E., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1934-39 GRIPTON, J. M., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1913-18 GROUT, F. L. J., E.D., Major, Q.O.R.C. 

1935-39 GROVER, J. L., Lieut., Infantry Corps. 

1926-32 GUNN, J. M., Lieut, R.C.A. 

1927-29 HADDON, G. P. E., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 

IX 



1900-03 HAGARTY, W. G., D.S.O., Colonel, No. 31 Re- 
serve Brigade Group. 

1914-15 HALE, J. J., Capt., R.C.A. (demob.). 

1941-43 HALLER, P. N., Pte., C.A.T.C. 

1936-39 HAMPSON, H. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. (demob.). 

1934-39 HAMPSON, J. G., Lieut., D.Y.R.C. Hussars 
(demob.). 

1936-39 HANCOCK, G. R. K., Capt., Highland Light In- 
fantry of Canada. 

1938-39 HANNA. J. E., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1940-42 HARE, M., Pte., British Army. 

1940-42 HARE, P. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-30 HARRINGTON, C. F., Major, R.C.A. 

1928-31 HARRINGTON, J. E., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1926-29 HARRIS, L. P., Capt., Armoured Corps. 

1937-38 HARSTONE, J. C. R., Lieut., A. & S. High- 
landers. 

1936-41 HART, J. O., 2nd Lieut, U.S.M.A.C.R. 

1936-38 HART, M. C, Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

1940-43 HARVEY, O. D., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1934-38 HARVEY, W. C, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-30 HATCH, C, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

Master HASS, H. C, F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1913-18 HAULTAIN, C. F., E.D., Capt., Midland Regt. 
(demob.). 

1904-09 HAULTAIN, R. M., Capt., R.C.A. 

1940-43 HAYES, B. P., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1935-38 HAYES, J. S., Lieut., Calgary Highlanders. 

1938-42 HEATON, P. B., Mids., R.C.N.V.R. 

1922-27 HEES, G. H., Major, R.C.A. 
tl934-35 HEES, W. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Killed on Active 
Service) . 

1933-37 HEIGHINGTON, A. G., Gnr., R.C.A. 
1 1928-32 HEIGHINGTON, E. N., Captain, 48th High- 
landers of Canada (Killed in Action). 

1930-36 HENDERSON, H. L., A/Lieut.-Cmdr., 
R.C.N.V.R. 

1917-18 HENDERSON, L S., Lieut, R.C.A. (S.O.S.) 

1933-36 HENDERSON, J. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1930-33 HESSEY-WHITE, P. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

X 



1928-29 
1923-26 
1933-36 
1934-40 

1937-42 
t 1934-35 

1929-34 

Master 

1936-38 

1911-14 

1941-43 

1925-31 

1938-44 

1937-41 

1937-44 
tl937-41 

1912-16 
1926-31 
1923-29 
1931-35 

1943-44 
1933-36 

Master 
1925-31 
1938-42 
1942-44 
t 1929-31 

1937-43 
tl931-32 
1 1936-39 

1935-37 
1923-28 



HEWITT, G. W., Major, Duff. Hald. Rifles. 
HEWITT, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
HEYBROEK, E. P., S/L, R.C.A.F. 
HIGGINBOTHAM, J. F. M., Tpr., Armoured 

Corps. 
HIGGINS, L. T., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
HINGSTON, F. B., P/0, R.C.A.F. (KUled in 

Action) . 
HINGSTON, H. W., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
HISCOCKS, C. R., Lieut.-Col., R.M. 
HOBBS, R. B., P/0, R.C.A.F. 
HOGG, V\^. S., Lieut., R.C.A. 
HOLMAN, R. M., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 
HOLMES, J., P.O., R.C.N.V.R. 
HOLTON, J. M., Pte., Infantry Corps. 
HOLTON, L. J., Polish Cross of Valour, Lieut., 

Armoured Corps. 
HOPE, F. C, Tpr., Armoured Corps. 
HOPE, J. C. W., p/0, R.C.A.F. (Killed on 

Active Service). 
HOWARD, E. F., M.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

S/Sergt., U.S. Marine Corps. 
Major, R.C.A.M.C. 
W., A/Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., 



P. 
P. 
V. 



HOWARD, P. 

HOWARD, R. 

HOWLAND, 
R.C.N. 

HUGHES, J. A., Pte., British Army. 

HUGHES-HALLET, D. H. C, Lieut., U.S. 
Army. 

HUMBLE, A. H., Capt., Army Examiner. 

HUME, J. J., Pte., West Nova Scotia Regt. 

HUME, R. D., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

HUNGERFORD, T. E., P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.) 

HUNTER, C. H., W.0.1, R.C.A.F. (Killed on 
Active Service). 

HUYCKE, F. A. M., Gnr., R.C.A. 

HYDE, G. G., F/0, R.C.A.F. (KUled in Action). 

HYNDMAN, F. T., Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. (Kill- 
ed in Action). 

HYNDMAN, H. H., Lieut, R.C.N, (demob.). 

INGLES, C. L., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 



XI 



1927-29 INGLIS, R. S., Capt., R.C.A. 
1907-10 INGS, E. I. H., M.C., Major, C.A.T.C. 
1923-31 IRVINE, J. A., Capt., R.C.A. 
1934-38 IRWIN, D. M., Major, Armoured Corps. 
1926-31 IRWIN, H. E., Major, Armoured Corps. 
1935-38 IRWIN, J. R., Lieut. (E), R.C.N.V.R. 
1941-43 JACKSON, F. B., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 
tl939-40 JACKSON, J. D., Lieut., Q.O.R.C. (Killed in 

Action) . 
1938-40 JACKSON, W. H., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 
1922-24 JAQUAYS, H. M., E.D., Lieut.-CoL, the Black 

Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1906-08 JARVIS, A. E. deM., D.F.C., Croix de Guerre, 

S/L, R.C.A.F. 
1916-18 JARVIS, E. A. M., E.D., Major, N.D.H.Q. 
1937-42 JELLETT, J. D., Mids., R.C.N. 
1926-30 JEMMETT, D. E. ff. O.B.E., A/Cmdr., 

R.C.N.V.R. 
1934-39 JEMMETT, J. L. ff., Capt., Armoured Corps. 
1940-43 JOHNSON, D. M., Pte., C.M.G.T.C. 
1929-31 JOHNSON, L. G., Major, R.C.A.M.C. 
1933-39 JOHNSON, R. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. (freed P. 

O.W.). 
1917-22 JOHNSTON, D. C, Pte., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1 1930-37 JOHNSTON, M. G., Lieut., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. (Killed in Action). 
1935-41 JONES, A. R. C, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1920-22 JONES, A. W., Major, R.C.E. 
1917-19 JONES, C. E. F., Colonel, Can. Forestry Corps. 
1936-44 JONES, D. F. N., N.A.2, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 
1937-39 JONES, G. K., D.F.C. & Air Medal, Lieut., U.S. 

Army Air Corps. 
1918-20 JONES, W. O., Capt., R.C.O.C. 
1937-38 JOY, D. H., Mids., R.C.N. 
1936-38 JOY, H. P. G., N.A.2, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 
1934-38 JUKES, A. J. K., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 
1929-35 KEEFER, E. C, Surg.-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. (de- 
mob.). 
1929-36 KEEFER, R. G., D.F.C, F/L, R.C.A.F. 

xn 



1939-42 KEEFLER, D. I. M., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1939-40 KEEGAN, D. M., A/LA, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 

1933-37 KERR, J. W., Lieut, R.C.A.S.C. (demob.). 

1929-33 KERRIGAN, J. V., Capt., R.C.A. 

1938-41 KERRY, C. W., Bdr., R.C.A. 

1909-11 KETCHUM, E. J., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 

1911-15 KETCHUM, H. F., Capt., Army Examiner. 

1912-18 KETCHUM, K. G. B., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. (de- 
mob.). 

1935-37 KETCHUM, S. M. O., Wren Sig., W.R.C.N.S. 

1939-44 KEYES, R. G., Pte., U.S. Army. 

1930 KIESEWETTER, W. B., Capt., U.S. Army Air 

Corps (Med.). 

1930-31 KILGOUR, J. F., Capt., Can. Dental Corps. 

1920-26 KING, J. G., Lieut.-Cmdr., U.S.N.R. 

1928-31 KING, T. B., Capt., Kent Regt. (M.G.) (Freed 
P.O.W.). 

1920-25 KINGSMILL, N., Lieut.-Col., S.D. & G. High- 
landers (demob.). 

1922-30 KIRK. C. B. K., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 
1 1933-39 KIRKPATRICK, H. J., Flt.-Sergt., R.C.A.F. 
(Missing, Presumed Killed in Action) . 

1933-35 KLINE. J. E., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1937-40 KNAPP, D. B., Pte., A.S.T.P.R. 

1937-40 KNAPP, J. D., P.F.C., U.S. Army Air Corps. 

1930-34 KNOX, G. B., Lieut., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) 
of Canada. 

1932-35 KORTRIGHT. L. H. G.. Lieut., R.C.O.C. 

1939-41 KOVACS, R. V„ Sergt.. R.C.A.F. 

1942-44 LAING, C. A., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1941-42 LAING. G. D., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1934-38 LAMBERT, E. H. N., Sergt.. R.C.A.F. (demob.) 

1934-43 LAMBERT, S. N., Cadet., Indian Army. 

1931-39 LANDRY, P. C, Cpl.. R.C.A.F. 

1930-35 LANGDALE, A. H., Staff Sergt., R.C.E.M.E. 

1937-39 LANGDON, W. H., Lieut.. F.S.S.F. 

1935-40 LANGMUIR, J. W. C. D.F.C., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1925-30 LASH, Z. R. B., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-31 LAW, D. A., Capt., the Black Watch (R.H.R.) 
of Canada. 

XIII 



\ 



1926-30 LAW, J. F., Lieut.-Col., Royal Regt. of Canada. 
1933-34 LAWSON, A. D., Chief Wireless Officer, U.S. 

Merchant Marine. 
1899-04 LAWSON, H. O., Colonel, N.D.H.Q. (demob.). 
1936-39 LAWSON, J. H., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1938-43 LAWSON, J. P., Cadet, R.C.N.V.R. 
1933-34 LAWSON, W. A., Lieut., Cameron Highlanders 

of Ottawa. 
1937-40 LAYNE, J. H., Gnr., R.C.A. 
1919-21 LAZIER, H. D. F., Major, R.H.L.I. (freed P. 

O.W.). 
1920-22 LAZIER, J. E., Lieut. 
tl924-25 LEA, S. A. W., Flight Sergt., R.C.A.F. (Miss- 
ing, Presumed Killed in Action). 
1928-34 LEADBEATER, W. J., Capt., 48th Highlanders 

of Canada. 
1931-37 LEATHER, E. H. C, Capt., R.C.A. 
1936-39 LEBROOY, P. B., Tpr., Armoured Corps. 
1936-39 LEBROOY, P. J., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1898-03 LEE, J. F. B., M.C., Major, R.C.A.M.C. 
1923-26 LEGO AT, M. H., Pte., Seaforth Highlanders 

(S.O.S.). 
1936-39 LeMESURIER, A. S., Lieut., 48th Highlanders 

of Canada. 
1938-42 LeMESURIER, J. R., Lieut., R.C.A. 
1940-44 LeSUEUR, R. V., Pte., Infantry Corps. 
1938-41 LEWIN, F. S., Cpl., R.C.A.S.C. (demobilized). 
1935-37 LEWIS, D. J., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1921-22 LIEB, J. S., Capt., Ordnance Dept., U.S. Army. 
1927-30 LINES, S. J. H., Gnr., R.C.A. 
1934-38 LITHGOW, C. H., Major, Royal Canadian Regt. 
1929-32 LITTLE, M. H., Surg.-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1936-42 LLOYD, J. B. C, L/Cpl., R.C.O.C. 
1922-27 LONDON, G. T., Major, Canadian Scottish 

Regt. 
1918-19 LOOSEMORE, J. P., A/Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., 

R.C.N. 
1927-37 LOWE, W. B., O.F.C., R.A. 
1934-36 LUCAS, G. T., Capt., R.C.A. 
1925-29 LUCAS, G. S., Lieut., R.C.A. 

XIV 



1907-10 LUMSDEN, G. L., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1911-12 LUSSIER, E. J, D.F.C., S/L, R.C.A.F. 
1 1924-28 LYON, R. P., Major, 48th Highlanders of Cana- 
da. (Killed on Active Service). 

1921-25 LYON, W. D., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1904-11 MACAULAY, N. H., D.S.O., Lieut.-Colonel 
Armoured Corps (demob.). 

1916-21 MacCAUL, D. H., Group Capt., R.C.A.F. 

1941-42 MACDONALD, D. D., Cadet Officer, Can. Mer- 
chant Navy. 

1929-30 MACDONALD, D. K. deB., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1910-13 MACDONALD, D. M., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1922-27 MACDONALD, G. W. K., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1939-43 MACDONALD, I. R., N.A.2, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.) 

1909-16 MACDENDRICK, D. E., Major, Q.O.R.C. 

1936-40 MacKENZIE, M. G., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 

1937-41 MacKINNON, P. B. L., L/Cpl., R.C.O.C. 

1939-41 MACKINTOSH, A. J. F., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1915-30 MACKINTOSH, D. C, Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 
V.R. 

1922-25 MacLAURIN, A. L., Croix de Guerre, Capt., the 
Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 

1928-31 MacNUTT, E. G., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1935-38 MAGEE, A. G., Major, Royal Canadian Regt. 

1934-37 MAGEE, B. R. B., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-35 MAGEE, E. D. B., Major, R.C.E. 
tl930-32 MARKHAM, G. A., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
(Killer in Action). 

1931-35 MARTIN, E. D. K., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1920-26 MARTIN, H. A. R., M.C., Capt., R.C.A. 

1927-29 MARTIN, H. A., Major, Armoured Corps. 

1936-38 MARTIN, M. C, Tpr., D.Y.R.C. Hussars. 

1913-14 MARTINSON, P. J., Major, R.C.O.C. 

1940-42 MATHERS, W. G., A/LA, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.) . 

1902-07 MATHEWSON, F. S., D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., the 
Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada 
(demob.). 

1927-28 MAUGHAN, A. H., Capt., Canadian Grenadier 
Guards (S.O.S.) 

XV 



tl936-40 McAVITY. H. K.. F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing, 
Presumed Killed in Action). 

1936-36 McBRIDE, R. F.. F/L, R.C.A.F. (Freed P.O.W.) 

1913-14 McCARTER, G. A., Brig., R.C.A. 

1917-18 McCarthy, D., Major, R.C.A. (Freed P. 
O.W.). 

1940-41 McCAUGHEY, J. H., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-33 McCLOSKEY, P. H., M.C., Lieut. 

1926-30 McCONNELL, J. N., T/5, U.S. Army. 

1934-39 McCONNELL, W. A., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1931-38 McCONNELL, W. S., Cpl., U.S. Army. 

1927-31 McCREA, A. E., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1935-38 McCULLOUGH, J. C, F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1919-21 Mcdonald, H. S., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1923-24 McFARLANE, M. M., Capt., N.D.H.Q. 

1931-36 McFARLANE, P. A., D.F.C., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
(demob.). 

1929-33 McGINNIS, A. D., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1928-36 McGLASHAN, J. C, Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1942-45 McINTYRE, P. H., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1936-38 McIVOR, A. M., Cpl., R.H.L.L 

1936-39 McIVOR, W. J., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 
1 1928-37 McLAREN, F. G., Major, 48th Highlanders of 
Canada. (Killed in Action). 

1919-22 McLAREN, H. D., Capt., R.C.A. 
tl928-34 McLAREN, R. D., D.F.C., F/L, R.A.F. (Killed 
in Action). 

1921-25 McLAREN, R. E., Major, R.H.L.I. (Repatriat- 
ed P.O.W.) . 

1939-42 McLEAN, A. R., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1927-30 McLEAN, D. W., M.C., Major, P.P.C.L.L 

1931-36 McLENNAN, J. L., Lieut., the Black Watch 
(R.H.R.) of Canada. 

1933-37 McLERNON, A. R., D.F.C., Group Capt., R.C. 
A.F. 

1933-36 McLERNON, L. R., D.S.C., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
+1925-30 McMULLEN, J. E. T., Capt., Seaforth High- 
landers. (Killed in Action). 

1926-28 McPHERSON, J. A. Pte., Toronto Scottish 
Regt. 

XVI 



1924-28 MEDD, S. A., Bdr., R.A. 

1917-19 MERRY, R. E., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1919-22 MERRY, R. L., E.D., Major, 48th Highlanders 

of Canada. 
1939-44 MICHAEL, F. B., Pte., C.A.T.C. 
1926-32 MICKLE, W. J., Lieut., 
1932-35 MILLER, W. B., Pay. Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N. 

V.R. 
1942-44 MILLHOLLAND, A. S., S i/c (SoM), U.S.N.R. 
1924-28 MILLICHAMP, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1929-35 MILLS, A. V. L., Lieut, the Black Watch (R. 

H.R.) of Canada. 
1931-34 MITCHELL, J. S., L/Cpl., R.C.A.S.C. 
1 1937-40 MONRO, G. G., Pte., Perth Regt. (Killed in 

Action). 
1909-10 MONTGOMERY, D. G., Capt., V.G. of C. 
1928-38 MOOD, W., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1 1937-42 MOORE, A. B., P/0, R.C.A.F. (Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 
1935-38 MOORHOUSE, A. E., Sub-Lieut., R.N.V.R. 

(F.A.A.). 
1941-44 MORGAN, D. W., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 
1940-44 MORGAN, R. E. S., Pte., R.C.A.M.C. 
1933-44 MORRIS, R. T., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 
1930-41 MORRIS, W. D., Sub-Lieut. (S), R.C.N. 
1928-33 MORRISEY, H. S., Lieut., R.C.A. 
1931-33 MORRISEY, J. P., Lieut, R.C.A.S.C. 
1917-21 MORSE, E. W., S/L, R.C.A.F. 
1938-40 MORTON, R. T., Cpl., R.C.C.S. 
1939-41 MOYSEY, R. D., P/0, R.C.A.F. 
1925-29 MUDGE, R. M. L., Cpl., R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1916-22 MULHOLLAND, R. D., Major, R.C.A. 
1911-13 MURISON, C. A. P., C.B., C.B.E., M.C., Major- 

General, R.A. 
1917-18 MURPHY, G. A., Capt., N.D.H.Q. 
1938-43 MURRAY, I. G., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 
1920-27 MUSSEN, P. V., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1932-33 NATION, G. H., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1907-08 NELLES, P. W., C.B., Admiral, R.C.N. 
1940-43 NESBITT, A. M., Coder, R.C.N.V.R. 

xvn 



1928-31 
1926-31 
1926-31 
1929-33 
1925-29 
1919-24 
1941-44 
1927-29 
1907-12 

1928-32 

1930-33 
1919-21 
1916-19 

Master 

1938-42 

1915-20 

1 1928-32 

1920-26 
1929-37 
1916-23 

1922-30 
1926-34 

1927-33 
1 1921-29 

1922-26 
1916-22 
1928-31 

1929-33 

+ Master 

1916-18 
1938-44 



S., D.F.C. & Bar, Wing Cmdr., 
(Missing). 



S., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
Capt., R.A. 
, H., E.D., Major, 



Armoured 



NEVILLE, D. G., N.A.2, R.A.F. Fleet Air Arm 
NEVILLE, D. H., Capt., U.S. Army. 
NEVILLE, G. L., Ensign, U.S.C.G.R. 
NEWMAN, H. J. R., Capt., Royal Regt. of Can 
NICHOL, T. E., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
NICHOLS, T. E., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
NICOL, R. B., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 
NOBBS, F. J., Major, Royal Can. Dragoons. 
O'BRIAN, G. S., A.F.C., Air Commodore, 

R.C.A.F. 
O'BRIAN, P. G 

R.A.F. 
O'BRIEN, H. J. 
OGILVIE, J. T., 
OGILVIE, R. E 

Corps. 
OGLE, W., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
OLDS, H. K., Sergt., U.S. Army Air Corps. 
ORCHARD, R. H. G., Lieut, R.C.E. 
OSBORNE, J. W., Lieut., A. & S. Highlanders. 

(Killed on Active Service). 
OSLER, B. M., Major, R.C.A. 
OSLER, C. R., Major, R.C.A. 
OSLER, G. S., Capt., 48th Highlanders of Can- 
ada (demob.). 
OSLER, J. G., Major, R.C.A. 
OSLER, P. C, Lieut., P.P.C.L.I., (freed P. 

O.W.). 
OSLER, P. S., Major, R.C.A. 
OSLER, R. F., Lieut., 48th Highlanders of 

Canada. (Killed in Action). 
OSLER, W. E., Major, Q.O.C.H. 
OSLER, W. R., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
OSWALD, W. E. D., Lieut., the Black Watch 

(R.H.R.) of Canada. 
PADLEY, C. C, Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
PAGE, W. D., W.O., R.C.A.F. (Killed in 

Action) . 
PANET. deL. H. M., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A. 
PARKER, E. M., Tpr., Armoured Corps. 

xvm 



Master PARR, D. K., Major, R.C.O.C. 

1931-41 PARR, J. K., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-38 PARTRIDGE, D. G., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1930-35 PASSY, deL. E. S., Flt.-Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1931-35 PASSY, F. C., Major, R.A. 

1938-41 PATCH, C. M., Lieut., 4th K.S.L.I. 

1935-38 PATCH, H. M., Bdr., R.C.A. 

1933-36 PATCH, P. R., Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1929-32 PATCH, R. A., Capt., R.C.A. 

1939-43 PATERSON, H. B., Gnr., R.A. 

1924-31 PATERSON, H. C, L/S, R.C.N.V.R. 

1941-43 PATERSON, J. A., Cadet, R.C.N, (demob.). 

1939-43 PATERSON, N. R., Officer Cadet, R.C.S. 

1928-32 PATTON, J. M. S., G.C., Capt., R.C.E. 

1929-32 PAVEY, W. G. H., Lieut., Armoured Corps. 

1936-40 PEACOCK, E. F., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

tl935-38 PEACOCK, J. V/. F., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Killed in 
Action). 

1909-12 PEARCE, H. J. L.. M.C., Lieut., Canadian 
Forestry Corps. 

1920-29 PEARCE, J. P., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 

1929-33 PEARSON, B. F. C, A.C.I, R.C.A.F. 

1936-40 PEARSON, H. J. S., Capt., Calgary High- 
landers. 

1931-33 PECK, H. S., Capt., R.C.A. 

1933-35 PENFIELD, W. G., Capt., W/Intell., Can. 
Army. 

1928-32 PENNY, A. E. G., Writer, R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-37 PERLEY-ROBERTSON, A., Capt., R.C.A. 

1941-43 PHILLIPS, W. M., Cadet, R.C.N. 

1941-43 PHIPPEN, J. G., Gnr., R.C.A. 

1921-25 PHIPPS, N. E., Major, R.C.A. 

1930-34 PINCOTT, S. W., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1927-29 PITCHER, P. B., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1928-29 POPHAM, J. R., Major, the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada. 

1929-31 POWELL, R. M., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1931-33 POWELL, W. H., Capt., P.L.D.G. 

1915-18 PREWER, V. H., Major, Armoured Corps. 

1930-32 PRICE, A. S.. Major. R.C.A. 

XIX 



1924-29 PRICE, D. G., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 
1917-19 PRICE, F. A., O.B.E., Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 
1929 PRICE, H. E. C, M.B.E.. Major, Royal Can. 

Regt. 
1918-24 PRICE. H. V., Major, R.C.A.P.C. 
1927-34 RATHBONE, G. H., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 
1933-36 RAWLINSON, G. L., M.C., Lieut., Armoured 

Corps. 
1916-24 RAY, R. G.. Capt., R.C.E. 
1937-39 REA. J. K., Lieut., Infantry Corps. 
1 1937-39 REDPATH, J. G., P/0, R.C.A.F. (Killed on 

Active Service). 
1920-33 REDPATH, R. F., Sergt., Victoria Rifles of 

Canada. 
1927-33 REED, L. M. K., Major, Infantry Corps. 
1916-19 REES, H. C, Lieut., R.C.A. 
1940-42 REDFORD, M. S., N.A.2, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 
1928-30 REID, G. R., Lieut., R.H.L.I. 
1936-43 REID, I. B., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 
tl934-37 REID, R. M. F., P/0, R.C.A.F. ((Missing, Pre- 
sumed Killed in Action). 
1930-34 REID, T. L., Lieut., R.C.E. 
1930-34 REID, W. B., Lieut., 48th Highlanders of Can. 

(freed P.O.W.). 
1933-38 RENISON, G. E., Lieut.-Col., Hastings & P. E. 

Island Regt. 
1926-29 RENISON, R. J. B., F/L, R.A.F. (freed P. 

O.W.). 
1901-04 RHODES, Sir G. D., K.C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., 

Brig.-Gen., R.E. 
1920-22 RICHARDSON, K. P., S/L., R.C.A.F. 
1921-26 RITCHIE, R. A., Capt., R.C.A. 
1938-40 ROBARTS, C. P. S., Gnr., R.C.A. (demob.). 
1942-45 ROBARTS, G. L., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 
1928-30 ROBERTS, A. E., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1923-26 ROBERTS, J. P., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1930-36 ROBERTSON, G. R., Capt., Victoria Rifies of 

Canada. 
1936-39 ROBERTSON, J. H., Sergt.-Pilot, R.C.A.F. 

XX 



1926-30 ROBERTSON, S. R., Lieut., Royal Montreal 
Regt. 

1935-36 ROBINSON, F. C, F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1926-33 ROBSON, E. W., Lieut., Armoured Corps. 

1943-45 ROBSON, P. C, Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 
tl922-25 ROGERS, E. B., Major, R.C.A. (Killed in 
Action) . 

1894-96 ROGERS, G. H., Co., H.Q., Home Guard, Eng. 
(demob.). 

1911 ROGERS, H. S., Capt., R.C.A. 

1924-33 ROGERS, J. B., Capt, R.C.E. 

1936-41 ROGERS, J. B., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1928-32 ROGERS, W. F. B., Lieut., Irish Regt. of Can- 
ada (S.O.S.) 

1927-31 ROPER, P. K., F/L, R.C.A.F. (freed P.O.W.). 

1943-44 ROSE, J. F., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1928-31 ROSS, J. K., Capt., 1st Hussars. 

1935-36 ROSS, J. L. S., Lieut., R.C.E. 

1916-17 ROSS, K. A., E.D., Major, V.T.S., M.D.I. 

1927-32 ROUGHTON, P. R. W., Major, U.S. Artillery. 

1932-39 ROUGVIE, C. N., Pte., 4th P.L.D.G. 

1921-28 ROUS, F. H., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1929-30 RUSSEL, A. D., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1926-34 RUSSEL, B. D., D.S.O., D.F.C. & Bar, Wing 
Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1924-28 RUSSEL, C. M., Major, R.C.A. 

1933-39 RUSSEL, H., F/L, R.C.A.F. (Missing). 
tl931-34 RUSSEL, H. D. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., (Miss- 
ing, Presumed Killed in Action). 

1934-39 RUSSEL, O. K. S., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1935-38 RUSSEL, P. M., Lieut., D.Y.R.C. Hussars. 

1937-42 RUSSEL, D. K., P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1942-44 RUTHERFORD, G. B., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-32 RYERSON, Y. E. S., Lieut., Royal Regt. of 
Canada (freed P.O.W.). 

1915-20 RYRIE, J., F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1914-18 RYRIE, R., Cpl., R.C.A.F. 

1928-31 SAVAGE, G. C, Major, R.C.A. 

1928-32 SAVAGE, H. B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1941-43 SAVAGE, R. W., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

XXI 



1937-39 SAVAGE, W. A., W.0.1. R.C.A.F. 

Master SCHAEFER, C, F/L, R.C.A.F. 

1926-30 SCHELL, H. R., Major, Armoured Corps. 

1942-43 SCHELL, P. C, P/0, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1 1917-24 SCHOLFIELD, G. P., Major, Royal Regt. of 
Canada. (Died of Wounds while Prisoner 
of War) . 

1941-42 SCHWARTZ, D. B., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1935-37 SCOTT, G. F., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 

1932-34 SCOTT, H. J., Capt., R.C.A.M.C. 

1919-20 SCOTT, J. G., Major, Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1940-43 SCOTT, K. A. C, Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1929-36 SEAGRAM, C. J., Lieut., 48th Highlanders of 
Canada. 

1920-26 SEAGRAM, N. O., Wing Cmdr., R.C.A.F. 

1926-34 SEAGRAM, R. D., Lieut, Q.O.R.C. 

1934-39 SEAGRAM, T. B., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 

1940-42 SEARLE, S. A., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1917-19 SHARP, H. McK., Brig., Armoured Corps. 

1913-14 SHARP, J. McA., E.D., Major, H.Q., 1st Cana- 
dian Division. 

1928-31 SHAW, H. V., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. (S.B.). 

1907-10 SHEPHERD, O. G., Lieut.-Col., Canadian Den- 
tal Corps. 

1942-43 SHORT, J. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1925-27 SILVER, P. D., Capt., R.C.A. 

1940-42 SIMPSON, F. J. H., 

1937-41 SIMS, P. B., Lieut., Irish Regt. of Canada. 

1921-24 SLATER, N. D., Croix de Guerre, Capt., R.C.A. 

1935-36 SLEE, J. F., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1940-42 SMITH, A. A. G., 2nd Lieut., C.A.T.C. 

1 1917-25 SMITH, A. L., Capt, R.C.A. (Killed m Action). 

1932-37 SMITH, E. L. G., Major, R.H.L.I. 

1916-20 SMITH, F. A., Chaplain & Hon. Major, 4th 
P.L.D.G. 

1933-37 SMITH, G. H., Lieut., C.M.H.Q. 

1933-37 SMITH, R. H., Capt., British Columbia Regt. 

1941-44 SMYTHE, J. S., Pte., Algonquin Regt. 

1941-42 SNEATH, G. R., Sub-Lieut., R.N.V.R. 

1927-32 SOMERS, D. C, Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. (S.O.S.). 

xxn 



1923-28 SOMERS, G. B., Capt., Q.O.R.C. 

1919-20 SOMERS, G. T., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 

1931-41 SOMERVILLE, C. M., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1928-36 SOUTHAM, B. G., Capt., R.C.O.C. 

1926-32 SOUTHAM, F. M., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1927-28 SOUTHAM, J. D., Major, R.C.A. 

1926-29 SOUTHAM, K. G., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1941-44 SOUTHEY, J. B. S., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

Master SPEECHLY, W. G., Lieut., Royal Winnipeg 

Rifles. 
1937-43 SPEIRS, H. A., N.A.2, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 
1938-42 SPENCE, R. G., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1938-39 SPENCER, C. H. A., Capt., Irish Regt. of 

Canada. 
1894-02 SPENCER, C. R., Chaplain & Hon. Major, Can. 

Army. 
1924-30 SPRAGGE, E. W., L/Cpl., R.C.O.C. 
1906-11 SPRAGGE, G. W., F/L, R.C.A.F. (demob.). 
1918-24 SPRAGGE, J. G., D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D., Brig., 

Q.O.R.C. 
1928-31 SPRAGGE. P. W., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1940-41 STANGER, E. T., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1931-35 STARNES, J. K., Capt., the Black Watch (R. 

H.R.) of Canada. 
1928-29 STAUNTON, S., 
1927-31 STAUNTON, T. A., Capt., Q.O.R.C. 
1930-34 STAUNTON, T. A. G., Lieut, R.C.N.V.R. 
1927-30 STEPHENS, A. K., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. . 
1938-44 STEWART, I. C, N.A.2, R.N.V.R. (F.A.A.). 
1927-33 STIKEMAN, W. J. C, M.B.E., Lieut.-Col., the 

Black Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1924-30 STONE, A. C, Wing Cmdr.. R.C.A.F. 
1927-32 STONE, J. R., Sergt., Armoured Corps. 
1934-36 STORMS, D. D., L/Cpl.. R.C.E. 
1934-36 STORMS, P. H., Lieut., R.C.E. 
1919-23 STRATHY, C. M. A., Group Capt., R.C.A.F. 
1 1929-34 STRATHY, G. H. K.. Sub-Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

(Killed in Action). 
1919-22 STRATHY, J. G. K., E.D., Colonel. Q.O.R.C. 
1922-26 STRATTON, J. W., Capt., R.C.A.S.C. 

xxm 



1910-13 STRATTON. W. W., Lieut.-Col.. R.C.A.S.C. 

(demob.). 
tl939-42 STRONG, W. G. M., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. (Killed 

on Active Service). 
1897-01 STUART, C. J. S., M.C., Chaplain 8z Hon. 

Lieut.-Col. (demob.). 
1940-42 SULLY. B. A. B., 2nd Lieut., Armoured Corps. 
1917-23 SUMMERHAYES, D. T., F/L, R.A.F.V.A. 
1914-15 SUTCLIFFE, F. M., E.D., Capt., R.C.A. 
1939-42 SUTHERLAND. J. B. I., 2nd Lieut., the Black 

Watch (R.H.R.) of Canada. 
1938-42 SVENNINGSON, B., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1928-32 SWAISLAND, J. W., L/Cpl., R.C.A.F. 
1937-38 SWINTON, W. F., Capt.. R.C.A.S.C. 
1936-37 SYLVESTER. J. L.. Capt., R.C.A. 
1938-43 SYMONS, J. J., A/LA, R.N.A.S. (F.A.A.). 
1934-41 TATE, C. I. P., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1935-39 TAYLOR, E. W., Capt., Armoured Corps. 
Master TAYLOR, H. N., Chaplain & Hon. S/L. R.C. 

A.F. 
1 1936-38 TAYLOR, J. A. C, Sergt. Air Gnr., R.C.A.F. 

(Killed in Action). 
1934-35 TAYLOR. P. Y., D.F.C., Lieut., U.S. Army Air 

Corps. 
1926-32 TAYLOR, T. L., Lieut., Royal Regt. of Canada 

(freed P.O.W.) 
1940-42 THOMPSON, J. C, Cadet, C.P.T.C. 
1921-28 THOMPSON, J. S. D., Lieut., 48th Highlanders 

of Canada. 
1929-32 THOMSON, A. D. D., F/L, R.C.A.F. 
1937-39 THOMSON, J. S., D.F.C., F/0, R.C.A.F. 
1936-39 THOMSON, W. G., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
1915-19 TORNEY, T. H. F., Major, R.C.A. 
1940-41 TRACY, G. L., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 
1930-33 TRENHOLME. T. C, Capt.. Royal Montreal 

Regt. 
1922-24 TROW, A. M., Capt, Q.O.R.C. 
1929-30 TROW, G. H., Sub-Lieut.. R.C.N.V.R. 
1921-23 TROW, J. D., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
1936-39 TURCOT, C. S. E.,. Lieut., R.C.A. 

XXIV 



1934-38 TURCOT, J. P., A.C.2, R.C.A.F. 

1918-20 TURNER, A. H., Major, R.C.A. 

1919-21 TURNER, H. R., Major, R.C.A. 

1930-32 TURPIN, G. W. F., Capt., Royal Montreal Regt. 

1923-29 USBORNE, T. H., Flt.-Sergt, R.C.A.F. 

1928-32 VALLANCE, C. G., Lieut., R.H.L.I. 

1936-39 VALLANCE, J. M., Lieut., R.C.O.C. 

1922-25 VAN STRAUBENZEE, C. B., Lieut.-Colonel, 
Armoured Corps. 

1930-34 VAUGHAN, R. P., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1909-13 VERNON, A. A. H., S/L, R.C.A.F. 

1910-11 VIPOND, H. K., Lieut.-Col., R.C.A.P.C. 

1933-35 VIPOND, J. F., F/0, R.C.A.F. 

1933-38 VIPOND, J. R., Lieut., Irish Regt. of Canada 
(freed P.O.W.). 
1 1925-26 VOKES, F. A., Lieut.-Col., Armoured Corps 
(Killed in Action). 

1921-23 WADDS, G. M., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1937-40 WALCOT, C. A., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1928-34 WALDIE, I. S., Capt., Q.O.R.C. 

1941-44 WALKER, D. A., Tpr., Armoured Corps. 

1941-42 WALKER, J. M., Cpl., Infantry Corps. 

1936-39 WALLACE, J. A. G., P/0, R.C.A.F. 

1934-41 WARBURTON, H. W., Bdr., C.A.T.C. (de- 
mob.). 

1934-39 WARBURTON, J. A., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1936-41 WARNER, F. H. O., P.O., U.S.N.R. 

1932-38 WARNER, G. D. E., Capt, R.C.A.S.C. 

1936-39 WATERS, D. M., Lieut., R.C.N. 

1937-42 WATERS, J. G., Sub-Lieut., R.C.N. 

1937-38 WESTELL, R. L., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1941-43 WHEELER, A. D., A.B., R.C.N.V.R. 

1903-07 WHEELER, Sir E. O., K.B., M.C., Legion of 
Honour, Brig.-Gen., R.E. 
tl931-33 WHITE, W. L. C, Capt., Regina Rifles of Can- 
ada (Killed in Action). 

1927-34 WHITEHEAD, R. L. W., U.S. Field Ambulance 
SERVICE. 

1925-26 WHYTE, K. T., Capt., 48th Highlanders of 
Canada. 

XXV 



1941-43 WIGHT, J. B., Pte., Infantry Corps. 

1929-34 WIGLE, D. H., Group Capt., R.C.A.F. 

tl929-32 WIGLE, F. E., O.B.E., D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., A. 

and S. Highlanders (Killed in Action). 

tl905-08 WILKES, A. B., Major, R.A.M.C. (Died on 
Active Service). 

1924-31 WILKIE, D. R., Capt., Royal Regt. of Canada. 

1926-30 WILKINSON, A. H., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 

1942-43 WILKINSON, F. J., A.C.I, R.C.A.F. 

1941-43 WILKINSON, G. L., Sergt., R.C.A.F. 

1930-33 WILLIAMS, B. S., Lieut., U.S.N.R. 

1911-15 WILLIAMS, E. W., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1927-31 WILLIAMS, R. S., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.C.N.V.R. 

1937-42 WILLS, H. P., Ord/Smn., R.C.N.V.R. 

1934-39 WILLS, W. S., Lieut., R.C.C.S. 

1910-13 WILSON, A. L., Major, R.C.A. (demob.). 

Master WILSON, D. S., Lieut., Pictou Highlanders. 

1921-24 WILSON, E. C. J., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1905-06 WILSON, J. C, Lieut.-Col., R.C.A.M.C. 

1936-39 WILSON, J. W., Lieut., C.M.G.T.C. 

1918-21 WILSON, R. B., Lieut., R.C.A. 

1940-44 WISENER, R. A., Chief Cadet Captain, R.C.N. 

1918-24 WISER, J. G., Capt., 4th P.L.D.G. 

1925-32 WOOD, J. D., Lieut., R.C.A.S.C. 

1937-39 WOOD, P. A., D.F.C., F/O, R.C.A.F. 

1937-38 WOODSIDE, G. E., Pte., R.C.O.C. 

1927-31 WORRELL, J. C. 

1928-32 WORTHINGTON, J. M. W., L.A.C., R.C.A.F. 

1919-26 WOTHERSPOON, G. D., D.S.O., E.D., Lieut.- 
Col., Armoured Corps. 

1925-31 WOTHERSPOON, R. B., Major, R.E. 

1930-32 WRIGHT, H. H., Lieut., the Black Watch (R. 
H.R.) of Canada (demob.). 

1930-32 WRIGHT, W. R., D.S.C., Lieut., R.C.N.V.R. 
(demob.) 

Master WYNN, C. N., Lieut.-Cmdr., R.N.V.R. 

1940-43 WYNNE, R. F., A.B., R.N.V.R. 



XXVI 



(3n ^^m0riam 



Killed in Action 

John Denis Butler (T.C.S. 1940-43) 
Trooper, Armoured Corps. 

John Andrew Cardew Duncan (T.C.S. 1940-42) 
Lieutenant, Grenadier Guards. 

Robert Duncan McLaren, D.F.C. (T.C.S. 1928-34) 
Flight Lieutenant, R.A.F. 

William Lyle Christie Whit-e (T.C.S. 1931-33) 
Captain, Regina Rifles of Canada. 

Frederick Ernest Wigle, O.B.E., D.S.O. 

(T.C.S. 1929-32) 

Lieutenant-Colonel, Argyle and Sutherland 

Highlanders. 

"Yet can I not persuade me thou art dead, 
Oh no! for something in thy face did shine 
Above mortality that showed thou wast divine." 



^- ^. f. 




^n ^tiuoxinm 



Missing, Presumed Killed in Action 

Ian Bruce Croll (T.C.S. 1921-27) 
Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Maurice Weir Gibson (T.C.S. 1925-30) 
Squadron Leader, R.C.A.F. 

John Ritchie Grant (T.C.S. 1930-32) 
Squadron Leader, R.A.F. 

Hugh Kaye McAvity (T.C.S. 1937-40) 
Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Arthur Brj^son Moore (T.C.S. 1937-42) 
Sergeant Air Gunner, R.C.A.F. 

Missing, Presumed Killed on Active Service 

Alan Gordon Byers (T.C.S. 1928-31) 
Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

"Yet can I not persuade me thou art dead, 
Oh no! for something in thy face did shine 
Above mortality that showed thou wast divine." 



^. 3- f. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Apr. 9 School Dance. 

11 Trinity Term begins. 

12 Death of President Roosevelt. 

22 Church Parade to St. John's. 

27 Debate with U.T.S., at Port Hope. 

May 1 Founder's Day: 80th Birthday of the School. 

3-4 Entrance and Scholarship Examinations. 

4 Mr. Anthony Adamson speaks on Architecture. 

5 Inter-School Gym. Meet, in Toronto. 

7 War in Europe ends. 

8 Victory Day: Whole holiday. 

12 Inspection of Cadet Corps: Col. the Hon. Colin 

Gibson, K.C., M.C., V.D., Minister of National 
Defence for Air. 

13 The Rev. E. M. Dann speaks in Chapel. 

14 Upper School Test Examinations begin. 

20 Whitsunday: Dr. H. C. Griffith, Headmaster of 
Ridley, speaks in Chapel. 

23 Mr. Wilson Macdonald recites Poetry. 

23 Inter-School Track Meet, at U.C.C. 

24 Empire Day: Whole holiday. 

26 First XI. vs. Toronto Cricket Club, at Port Hope. 

26 Dinner in Hall for Provost Cosgrave. 

27 Trinity Sunday: Annual Memorial Service; the 

Rev. F. H. Cosgrave, M.A., D.D., Provost of 
Trinity College, Toronto. 

28 Hockey Dinner. 

30 First XI vs. U.C.C, in Toronto. 

31 Final School Examinations begin. 

June 1 Sports Day. 

2 First XI vs. Ridley, at Toronto Cricket Club. 

3 Archdeacon F. H. Sawers speaks in Chapel. 

4 Choir Supper at the Lodge. 

6 First XI vs. S.A.C., at Toronto Cricket Qub. 

6 Tea for Office Holders at the Lodge. 

7 Prefects' Dinner at the Lodge. 

8 Athletic Prize Giving, 7 p.m. 

9 Speech Day: The Right Rev. R. J. Renison ('89- 

'92), M.A., D.D., Lord Bishop of Moosonee. 

15 Upper School Departmental Examinations begin. 
22 Annual Leaving Dinner. 

Sept. 11 Michaelmas Term begins for New Boys, 6 p.m. 
12 Supplemental Examinations begin at 8.30 a.m. 
12 Michaelmas Term begins at 8.30 p.m. 



Trinity College School Record 

Vol. 48 TRiNiri- College School. Port Hope, August, 1945 No. 6 



Editor-i.n' Chief P. C. Dobell 

News Editor S. C. Edmonds 

Literary Edttor G. P. Vernon 

Sports Editor E. McC. Sinclair 

Feature Editor T. McC. Wade 

Business Manager R. C. Paterson 

Assistants H. French, J. B. French, W. G. McDougall, J. R. McMurrich, 

A. M. Stewart, H. C. Butterfield, J. H. Caldbick, V. Dawson, W. M. 
Dobell, J. W. Dobson, D. A. Decker, J. W. Durnford, F. A. H. Green- 
wood, J. G. Gordon, J. M. Hallward, R. M. Kirkpatrick, T. W. Lawson, 
J. R. Ligertwood, J. D. McDonough, M. F. McDowell, W. H. Palmer 
G. A. H. Pearson, R. W. S. Robertson, R. V. S. Smith, R. L. Watts. 

Photography G. C. Bovaird, R. P. Stokes 

Junior School Record Mr. C. J. Tottenham 

Managing Editor Mr. W. K. Molson 

Treasurer Mr. A. H. N. Snelgrove 



The Record is published six times a year, in the months of October, December, 
February, April, June and August. 



EDITORIAL 

To-day a shadow is lifting over Europe and the World; 
after nearly six years of doubt and darkness, of uncer- 
tainty and fear, after the most gallant struggle and the 
fullest sacrifice the world has ever seen, light is beginning 
to dawn and life has meaning and a future in this world 
again. 

We are too close yet to the war to realize the full signi- 
ficance of it, but several aspects seem to be clear. 

An evil idea, conceived and generated in the minds of 
a small group of men and spread to a very large number 
of their countrymen through persuasion, threats, and fear, 
led a whole nation into criminal acts formerly perpetrated 
only by the worst gangsters. 



2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

This evil idea was based on the behef that one nation 
could dominate others by force and treat human beings as 
slaves for the benefit of the master race. 

Hostility and the most terrible cruelty took the place 
of understanding, tolerance, and friendship; barbaric force 
was substituted for reason; hysterical ravings took the 
place of truth ; killing and unthinkable concentration camps 
abolished any individual liberty. The fine spirit of man 
was being crushed to extinction. 

The attempt of these creatures to impose this dia- 
bolical doctrine on the world has resulted in more untimely 
death, more maiming, more misery and heartache than the 
world has ever known. 

If we set aside the horrible barbarities which have 
robbed the perpetrators of any right to the title of human 
beings, we find that the essential evil, the core of the 
cruelty, was the denial of the dignity of man, a denial that 
every man was created in the image of God. 

With that denial went the abolishing of all the Chris- 
tian virtues, and the imprisoning of Christian clergy, like 
Martin Niemohler, who resisted this evil scheme. 

Friendship, love, mercy, sympathy, were considered 
signs of weakness; kill, kill, kill for the fatherland was the 
bestial cry instead of the watchword, "Love the Lord thy 
God and thy neighbour as thyself." 

These creatures denied the existence of our God and 
gave full rein to the foul devil that was in them; they 
poisoned themselves and spread the poison to thousands of 
others. 

Surely we must constantly be on the alert to destroy 
the first sign of any such poison and not allow it to grow 
until it becomes a plague threatening the existence of 
human life everywhere. 

Now the lights which went out in September, 1939, 
are coming on again; now the communications between 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 3 

man and man. broken for six years, are gradually being 
restored. 

San Francisco means the possibility of a new inter- 
national world order based on justice, trust, faith, genero- 
sity and co-operation, based, in short, on the dignity of 
man and the God-like qualities in him. We must ever 
work and pray for the success of such a world order, work 
and pray earnestly and reverently for it. 

Never can we forget that our lives, our homes, our 
liberties, our faith, our whole future has been saved by the 
men of our forces and those of our allies. They have been 
superbly brave and self-sacrificing; they will live in our 
hearts for ever. Through their courage and greater love 
for their friends, 

"Honour has come back as a king to earth 
And paid his subjects with a royal wage; 
Nobleness walks in our paths again 
And we have come into our heritage." 

Let us, through our service for our fellow men, make 
sure that Honour and Nobleness and all their attendant 
qualities which bring peace and fair dealing and happiness 
among men, will never again disappear from our lives. 

— An address by the Headmaster in Chapel on 'VE' Day 



We have tried to make this issue of "The Record" a 
special VE Day number. In it will be found further facts 
about the war service of our Old Boys. We have been told 
on good authority that no civilian school in the Empire can 
boast a better war record; we are justly and deeply proud 
of our Old Boys, realizing something of the sacrifices they 
have made for us. 



4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

IN MEMORIAM 

J. D. Bl TLEK 

Trooper. Annoured Corps 

It seems only the other day that John Butler was 
walking do\Mi the corridors at T.C.S. m his usual cheery 
way: word of his deatli in action on May 4 shocked every- 
one and it was hard to believe that "Lou" would not be 
returning to us. 

He spent tliree years at T.C.S. from September. 1940, 
until June. 1943. By perseverance he became a member 
of the VI B Form and for two years he played on Bigside 
football, winning Middleside colours. In hockey he was a 
stalwart defence man on the Middleside team. 

In his tina] year he was appointed a House Officer and 
he fultilled his duties well. 

But it was in "off duty" hours tliat John made his 
mark; always did he jump into any discussion of the 
French Canadian question and present a formidable de- 
fence of his neighbour of Lake St. John. In debates he 
made many speeches, and the good natured argimients 
were often carried into tiie Brent House common room. 
John maintained his composure and kept a smile on his 
face whatever difficulties confronted him. 

Shortly after leaving he enlisted in tlie Infantry and 
after his basic training he was posted to Camp Borden in 
the Armoured Corps. He \'isited the School for week-ends 
sevei-al times and his many friends were indeed glad to 
see him again. 

Going to Elngland in the spring of 1944 he was sent 
to Italy in January. 1945. ti-avelling out on the same ship 
Fred Huycke was on. John was posted as part of a rein- 
forcement for the R.C.D.'s but that regiment came out of 
action before he joined it. Shortly afterwards, the Cana- 
dians were transferred to the European Theatre and John 
went into action a few days after his arrival. Writing to 
the School on April IS. he said his squadron had been ver>' 
fortunate in the few casualties they had sustained but they 
had taken about three hundred prisoners a day. No de- 
tails have vet been received of John's death but it is knovra 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 

his unit was in heavy fighting in Holland before the Ger- 
mans surrendered the day after he was killed. It was 
tragic that his death should have come just at the end of 
the JEighting in that part of Europe; he has done his 
courageous part to save the lives of many others. 

Our deep sympathy goes out to his mother and father 
of Isle Maligne, P.Q., who have lost an only son. 



A. G. BYERS 

Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Alan entered the Junior School in 1928 and left us 
from the Senior School in 1931. In School, he was a mem- 
ber of the McGill form and of the Littleside Gym. VIII; he 
played on the Littleside hockey team. Alan's fine char- 
acter was always admired and he had many friends. 

In 1931, he left for Switzerland, spending a year at 
Institution Sillig. 

Returning to McGill he studied Commerce, graduating 
with high standing, and chose the profession of Chartered 
Accountant. Within a year, he had passed all necessary 
C.A. examinations at the first time of writing and he joined 
the firm of Haskell, Elderkin and Company in Montreal. 
His ideals were set high, and he was quick to express dis- 
like for unethical business methods. 

On the outbreak of war, he could easily have remained 
deferred in his occupation, or he could have attained high 
rank in the Accountant Branch of the R.C.A.F., but he pre- 
ferred to be amongst the active flyers and to mix in happy 
comradeship. Alan enlisted in 1939, trained for pilot at 
Borden and Trenton, and was posted to fighters on the 
Pacific Coast. Promoted to Flight Lieutenant he was later 
posted to Coastal Patrol on the East Coast. 

In May, 1944, he was posted missing with a crew of 
twelve when his bomber disappeared and no trace was 
found. He was recently presumed dead. 

Surviving are his wife, son and daughter, his parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. Gordon Byers of Montreal, two brothers, 
Donald ('26-'30) and Malcolm, and two sisters, to all of 
whom the School extends deep sympathy. 



6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

I. B. CROLL 
Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Ian entered the School in September, 1921, the younger 
brother of Duncan Croll, and left in June, 1927. He was 
a very good student being in the top set of the Sixth Form, 
and he played all the games with enthusiasm, winning Mid- 
dleside colours in football and cricket, and second team 
colours in hockey. 

After he left he entered the Royal Military College, 
Kingston, and upon graduating he became associated with 
tthe Manufacturers Life Insurance Company in Winnipeg; 
later he was appointed branch manager of the Monarch 
Life in the same city. Very soon Ian had become one of 
the leading insurance men in the city. 

He enlisted early in 1940 and after winning his wings 
he was appointed an instructor at the Central Flying School 
in Trenton with the rank of Flying Officer. As his abilities 
were considered so highly by the officers in charge, he 
several times flew across the country to test the instruc- 
tors at the various schools in the Air Training Plan. Dur- 
ing these years he often visited the School in his English 
car and showed that he had lost none of his affection for 
T.C.S. He arranged to send his son to the Junior School, 
where he now is. 

In October, 1943, Ian was posted overseas and was 
attached to the R.A.F. flying new Mosquito bombers. In 
June, 1944, he was reported missing while on operations 
over enemy territory during the invasion of Europe. He 
is now officially presumed to have been killed. 

Ian was a most loyal son of the School; for many 
years he was secretary of the Winnipeg branch of the Old 
Boys' Association and never was any work for T.C.S. too 
much trouble for him. He had a confident, youthful out- 
look on life, giving zest and enthusiasm to all his under- 
takings. Though a man of his age and responsibilities 
could easily have remained in Canada, he was never one to 
stay behind because of danger and he knew the principles 
at stake in this war. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 7 

The School extends its deep sympathy to his parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. Croll of Saskatoon, to his wife and son, 
Andrew, and all the members of his family. 



J. A. C. DUNCAN 

Lieutenant, Grenadier Guards 

Andrew came to us from England with his cousin Ken 
Scott in September, 1940, and remained until June, 1942. 
He had been at Eton but very soon adjusted himself to life 
at T.C.S. and in his short stay became one of the most 
respected and popular boys in the School. No one could 
help admiring the beautifully built and cultured lad he was, 
and his modesty, friendliness, enthusiasm and happiness 
won all hearts. He was indeed a princoly type of English- 
man. 

In his final year he was in the Fifth Form, a member 
of the Choir, a faithful Sacristan, and a brilliant soccer 
player. 

Though only seventeen years of age, he felt he should 
return to England and enter an Officer Cadet's Training 
Unit at the earliest possible moment. He had the unique 
experience, for a boy of his age, of flying to England in 
wartime with Generals and Admirals. 

He re-entered Eton in October, 1942, and wrote to say 
that his training at T.C.S. made him excel most boys m 
military and gymnasium work and that he was well up in 
his studies. In February, 1943, he was nominated for an 
O.C.T.U. and after going through a stiff course of training 
he won a commission in the Grenadier Guards. 

For a time he was stationed at Windsor Barracks, 
training recruits, and he was a frequent guest at the Castle 
with the Royal Family. He achieved one of his ambitions, 
which was to be appointed to the King's Company, and 
early in 1945 he was commissioned a full Lieutenant — very 
high honours for a young man of twenty. 

He was sent to France last September and went 
through many battles with his famous regiment. 

On Good Friday, March 30, his battalion had crossed 
the Rhine at 2 a.m. and by first light had pushed well ahead. 
At Aalten, m Holland, they met stiff opposition; Andrew's 



8 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

company was sent around the town to attack from the side, 
and with Andrew's platoon leading, the company prepared 
to attack in strength. The Germans were shelling them 
heavily and Andrew ran forward to draw back a machine 
gunner who was in an exposed position. On his return he 
was hit by a mortar shell and badly wounded. He was 
rushed to the advance dressing station but he lived only 
twelve hours. His companions say that he showed the 
most supreme courage, laughing and joking until the end. 

Everyone loved Andrew Duncan and in his short life 
of twenty years he gave happiness to all who knew him. 
The memories of him will never grow dim and from them 
will spring new courage, new ideals, for he was indeed "a 
very perfect, gentle knight". 

We sorrow for his parents, Brigadier and Mrs. Duncan 
of Rajputana, India, who have lost their only son, for his 
uncle, Major-General Sir John Duncan, and all the mem- 
bers of his family. 



M. W. GIBSON 
Squadron Leader, R.C.A.F. 

Maurice entered the Junior School in September, 1925, 
and was with us for five years. 

From the first he won all hearts by his quiet, modest, 
appealing nature. Always he had a twinkle in his eye and 
nothing escaped his notice. He left us to complete his 
education and then entered business. Before the war he 
was employed with National Steel Car Company at Malton, 
Ontario. 

Enlisting in the Air Force in 1939, he was promoted 
to Pilot Officer early in 1940, and to Flying Officer in the 
same year. He served in Canada until the Spring of 1943, 
when he went to England as a Flight Lieutenant. 

During his three years as Instructor in Canada, 
Maurice had no fatal accident amongst those under his 
charge and he was regarded as one of the very best in- 
structors in the Air Force. In England, his Commanding 
Officer indicated that Maurice was considered one of their 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 

most capable pilots and he was promoted to Squadron 
Leader. 

On the night of February 8, 1944, his plane was forced 
down at sea about twenty-six miles from the coast. He 
was flying a Wellington, and the last message received 
spoke of engines missing. Rescue craft searched for them 
but no trace was found and he was recently presumed dead. 

The School extends its sincere sympathy to his wife, 
his mother, Mrs. F. M. Gibson, Picton, and his brothers, 
J. M. Gibson ('20-'29) and Eugene, who is now at the 
School. 



J. R. GRANT 
Squadron Leader, R.A.F. 



John Grant spent only two years at the School from 
September, 1930, until June, 1932, but he became one of the 
leading boys in that time. 

In his last year he was a member of the Remove form 
and played on the first football and the first hockey teams. 
He left us to continue his schooling, later entering business. 
On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Royal Air Force. 
He became a pilot on bombers and took part in many opera- 
tions over enemy held territory. He was mentioned in des- 
patches for his skill and daring. 

On May 11, 1944, his plane with the entire crew was 
lost near Louvain, Belgium, and John is now officially pre- 
sumed killed in action. We send our deep sympathy to his 
family in Kingston. 



H. K. McAVITY 

Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 

Hugh spent three years with us from September, 1937, 
until June, 1940, and during that time he made his mark 
in school life. 

In his final year he was a member of the Remove 
Form, a strong player on the Football team. Captain of a 
very good Hockey team, and a member of the Swimming 



10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

team. Because of his influence and reliability, he was 
appointed a School Prefect. 

He enlisted in the R.C.A.F. shortly after leaving the 
School and trained at Brandon, Regina, and Prince Albert. 
He received his wings on March 17, 1941, and was commis- 
sioned a Pilot Officer. 

On March 25, he was posted to Trenton for an instruc- 
tional course, and he instructed at Jarvis from June until 
October, 1941. In November, he was attached to the 
Coastal Artillery Co-Operative Squadron at St. John and 
in February, 1942, he was transferred to Dartmouth and 
later to Tor Bay, Newfoundland. 

On July 21, 1942, he was promoted to Officer Com- 
manding No. 2 C.A.C. at Dartmouth with the rank of Flight 
Lieutenant. He remained in that capacity until October 25, 

1943, and fellow officers speak extremely highly of the ser- 
vices he rendered. 

He went overseas in December, 1943, and became 
Senior Flight Commander of No. 439 Squadron. He was 
reported missing after air operations on February 10, 

1944, when his plane was seen to fall into the sea. An air- 
sea patrol could find no trace of any survivors but it was 
hoped he had been taken prisoner ; he has now been official- 
ly posted as presumed killed. 

Hugh often wrote to the School and it is indeed hard 
to think he is not returning. The School sends its sincere 
sympathy to his parents and all the members of his family. 



R. D. McLaren, d.f.c. 

Squadron Leader, R.A.F. 



Bob McLaren came to the Junior School as a very 
small boy in September, 1928, and some of us remember 
him and his winning way very clearly at that time. School 
work did not come particularly easily to him but he never 
lost his happy outlook on life and it carried him through 
many difficulties. 

Working his way steadily up, he was a member of the 
V Form in 1933, Captain of the Middleside Football team, 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD H 

Captain of the Middleside Cricket team, and a strong player 
on the Middleside Hockey team. Because of his genial 
nature and his desire to see the best in everyone he was a 
most popular member of the School. 

Leaving in June, 1934, Bob later went to England to 
study aeronautical engineering with the DeHaviland Air- 
craft Company. He enjoyed his work and did very well 
in it. 

Enlisting with the R.A.F. on the outbreak of war, he 
sailed through his course with the highest standing and 
was immediately made an instructor; stationed at first in 
Prestwick, Scotland, then in England, he was posted to 
Canada in 1941 finishing his duties at Goderich in June, 
1943. 

Bob was considered one of the most skilful instruc- 
tors in the R.A.F. and despite his repeated requests to be 
sent on operations, his superiors felt they could not spare 
him until the air training plan was in full swing. 

En route with his wife to England in June, 1943, he 
stayed with the Headmaster overnight and showed his 
bride every detail of the School. 

Bob was a most loyal and enthusiastic Old Boy and 
he said it was his ambition to see his son at T.C.S. Before 
he drove away he stood at the top of the hill looking to- 
ward Cobourg on a beautiful June morning and drank in 
the beauty of the countryside. 

After his return, he was stationed at Little Onn, 
Church Eaton, Staffs, and wrote often to the School about 
his activities and meetings with Old Boys. Among others, 
he had seen J. R. Grant and Pat Osier, and he was deeply 
saddened when they were reported missing. 

In November, 1944, Bob was awarded the D.F.C. for 
his distinguished and gallant service, and especially for the 
vital part he played in the sinking of the Tirpitz. Soon after, 
he was promoted to Squadron Leader and for a time was 
commanding his Flight. His work at that time was secret 
but it is now known that he was a leading member of the 
R.A.F.'s 'Met' flight, a small group of picked experts who 
explored the actual weather conditions over Germany be- 
fore every attack by the bomber command. They flew 
Mosquitoes. 



12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

In January, 1945, Bob wrote disclaiming any title to 
credit for winning the D.F.C. and saying that the Infantry 
had the tough job. He added, "Long pause — sort of day- 
dreaming about things — the Germans. What a canker on 
the face of the earth. Let us see that it does not fester 
again after this war." Bob was grateful to the School for 
the cigarettes and he said his young son, Duncan, age 
eight months, was getting ready to join us. 

In March, Bob was reported missing and later he was 
believed to have been killed. After the advance into Ger- 
many Bob's navigator was found and he gave details of 
Bob's death. They had been sent on reconnaissance over 
Germany on February 27; over Mayence they were sud- 
denly attacked by fighters and one engine was put out of 
action. The navigator thought they should jump but Bob 
climbed above the clouds and tried to get home with his 
information. Losing their course, they came down beneath 
the clouds into a heavy concentration of anti-aircraft. The 
plane crashed and Bob was killed instantly, though his 
navigator was miraculously thrown clear. 

Everyone who knew Bob was drawn to him by his 
friendliness and selfless kindness; his loss will be bitterly 
felt. Our deepest sympathy goes out to his wife and baby 
son, his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan McLaren 
of Toronto, and to the other members of his family. 



A. B. MOORE 
Sergeant Air Gunner, R.C.A.F. 

Arthur Bryson Moore was at the School from 1937 to 
1942. In his final year he was a House Officer, a member 
of the Sixth Form, and a stalwart player on the Second 
Basketball Team, not to mention his outstanding perform- 
ance on Middleside B Cricket. 

"Abe" enlisted in the Air Force in August, 1942, train- 
ed at Aylmer and Guelph, and graduated as an air-gunner 
from Macdonald, Manitoba, in August, 1943. Going over- 
seas, he served with an R.A.F. Bomber Command unit until 
posted missing after air operations. He was recently pre- 
sumed dead. 



TRINITY COLJ-.EGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 

Bryson had real character and won many friends dur- 
ing his years at the School. His school work was not easy 
for him, but he showed unusual interest in the drama and 
particularly in the development of screen plays. He was 
hoping to be a critic or a producer of plays. 

Bryson's father, the late "Art" Moore, was a former 
well-known member of the old Ottawa Silver Seven Hockey 
Team. He is survived by his two sisters, Mrs. Curtis C. 
Bogart and Mrs. Edward A. Evans, both of Ottawa, to 
whom we extend our sincere sympathy. 



W. L. C. WHITE 

Captain, Begina Rifles of Canada 

Lisle came to T.C.S. in 1931 and left us from the fourth 
form two years later. He attended Campion College, 
Regina, and later became a Civil Servant. Some of us re- 
member a visit he paid on a motor bike away back in 1934. 

He obtained a position with the T.C.A. in Regina but 
enlisted in 1939 with the Army, going overseas in 1941. In 
November, 1942, he returned to Calgary as an Instructor 
and was posted overseas again in August, 1943. He took 
part in the invasion on "D" Day with the Regina Rifles 
and was killed near Caen on July 8, 1944. 

Lisle was a most attractive lad, always willing and 
helpful; his loss will be keenly felt. 

The School extends its deep sympathy to his mother, 
Mrs. A. H. White of Saskatoon, and his sister, Mrs. G. N. 
McCallmn. 



F. E. WIGLE, O.B.E., D.S.O. 

Lieutenant-Colonel, Argyle & Sutherland Highlanders 

We were all terribly shocked to hear of the death in 
action, on April 12, of Fred Wigle, especially as we were 
just writing about the honours he had won by his gal- 
lantry and skill. 

Fred came to us from Hamilton in September, 1929, 
when the Senior School was at Woodstock, and he left 



14 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

from the Sixth Form in June, 1932, Few boys have shown 
stronger powers of leadership than Fred Wigle and it was 
an exceptional testimony to his forceful and upright char- 
acter that he was awarded the Bronze Medal for "steady 
perseverance in courtesy, industry and integrity", sharing 
this honour with the Head Prefect. 

Throughout his years at the School, Fred naturally 
showed the way to most of the other boys and he could 
always be relied upon to give the best that was in him. He 
was a leading Prefect, one of the best players on the Foot- 
ball team and on the Hockey team, and a member of the 
Second Eleven. 

Entering McGill, he continued to make a name for him- 
self, doing well in his course and starring on the University 
Football and Hockey teams. 

After graduating, he entered business in Montreal and 
in 1937 he married Miss Margaret Willmot Holton, of Ham- 
ilton, Fred served on the executive of the Old Boys' As- 
sociation and did much to make the 75th Anniversary re- 
union such a success. 

He enlisted in the Army in May, 1941, as Lieutenant, 
Training at Camp Borden in the Armoured Corps, he was 
posted overseas in November, 1941, with the rank of Cap- 
tain. 

In England, he was selected for a Staff Course and in 
September, 1943, he was confirmed in the rank of Major. 
Later he was appointed G,S,0, 1 of the 4th Armoured 
Division and his brilliant and brave conduct quickly mark- 
ed him for further promotion. 

In order to give him infantry experience he was ap- 
pointed to the command of the Argyle & Sutherland High- 
landers in February, 1945, with the rank of Lieutenant- 
Colonel. Very few officers have won so many promotions 
in such a short time. According to his fellow officers, 
Fred's inspiration and leadership soon made this battalion 
the most efficient one in the brigade. A high ranking staff 
officer and personal aide to General Montgomery says that 
"Fred fought his battalion magnificently all through the 
Hochwald battle — which was as tough a killing match as 
any unit has seen m this war. He then took his battalion 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 

across the Rhine and had been right up in the front until 
he was killed". 

Fred had moved his tactical headquarters into a build- 
ing in the little town of Friesoythe, west of Bremen. He 
had one officer and ten other ranks with him. At four in 
the morning of April 12 another battalion drove eighty 
Germans from a strong point a mile and a half south of 
Friesoythe. They retreated to Fred's town arriving about 
7 a.m. Fred saw them coming and realized he would have 
a struggle. He put half his men on the ground floor and 
half on the second floor. The Germans closed in and sur- 
rounded the house, firing at point blank range. After the 
first fierce encounter Fred sent a message for assistance 
and then decided to go upstairs to help his men there. Just 
as he put his foot on the first step a German paratrooper 
across the street fired into the open door and killed Fred 
instantly. All the rest of Fred's men were killed, with the 
exception of two, in this courageous battle of ten against 
eighty. 

According to the officer quoted above, "Fred had won 
the hearts of everybody wherever he had gone; his bat- 
talion worshipped him and by every man his death was 
considered a personal loss. His reputation as a commander 
was very high indeed and I know he was considered one of 
the best C.O.'s in the Canadian Army". 

In March, 1945, Fred was awarded the O.B.E. "for 
gallantry, efficiency, and devotion to duty." 

Later he was awarded the D.S.O. for complete disre- 
gard for personal safety in going forward to rally and in- 
spire his men under heavy German counter attacks. His 
battalion had been in action continuously for forty-eight 
hours but they were ordered to launch another attack on 
the east end of the Hochwald Forest gap at 2.30 a.m. In 
the words of the official citation, "By 4 a.m. all objectives 
had been taken. From 6 a.m. on, the enemy shelled and 
mortared the area incessantly and during the ensuing 24 
hours counter-attacked eight times with infantry and tiger 
tanks. During this entire time Lieut.-Col. Wigle was con- 
stantly forward with his leading companies, encouraging 
his men and co-ordinating their defences. Despite heavy 



16 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

casualties, he directed the fire so effectively that the final 
attack was driven off with great loss to the enemy. There 
can be no doubt that the skill, initiative and daring dis- 
played by this officer was directly responsible for the suc- 
cess of this difficult operation. His courage was an inspira- 
tion to all ranks under his command." 

After his death he was mentioned in despatches for 
gallant and distinguished service with the Armoured Corps 
before his appointment to the command of the A. & S. 
Highlanders. 

We mourn his loss and send our deep sympathy to his 
wife, his small son, his parents, Mr and Mrs. G. W. Wigle, 
and the other members of his family. 



A. B. WILKES 
Major, R.A.M.C. 



Major Wilkes, whose death was reported in a previous 
number, attended the School from 1905 until 1908. 

He served as a Captain in the R.C.A.M.C. in the last 
war and moved to England in 1936. At the outbreak of 
the present war he was appointed a Captain in the R.A. 
M.C. and carried out inoculations of British troops at Alder- 
shot. Later he was posted to the R.E.M.E. depot in Berk- 
shire as Medical Officer. He was promoted to the rank of 
Major and then made Second in Command of the Military 
Hospital in Ascot. In 1943, he was sent to Scotland to at- 
tend to troops who were leaving for the East. 

Owing to over work, he suffered a heart attack and 
died on December 29, 1943. 

At School Major Wilkes was a brilliant student, 
winning most of the prizes in the Fifth Form and he kept 
up his fine record at McGill. He was also a member of the 
First Football team. 

To Mrs. Wilkes and the members of his family the 
School sends its deep sympathy. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



17 




CHAPEL iMIiNOTES 



The Lost Property Office 

On Sunday, May 6, the Headmaster read in Chapel a 
story written by Dr. Alington of Eton shortly after the 
last Great War. 

The story dwejt with a lost property office, but one 
established to make good only personal losses. Into this 
office troop individuals who claim to have lost their money, 
their jobs, their books, umbrellas, etc., but the superin- 
tendent had to convince them that nothing could be done 
for them as these things hadn't really belonged to them at 
all. Then a man came to complain that his character had 
been taken away by a friend of his. but he was told that 
character was something one could not possibly lose and 
in reality it was his temper he had lost. If he just let it 
be known that he had lost it, then it would come back all 
right. Another man in great distress though he had lost 
his faith, but he was told it had never been his own but one 
he had found lying about and had picked up. "It's a good 
pattern", said the superintendent, "and there's more of the 
same material. What matters is the stuff it's made of and 
not the precise cut. But you must do some of the work 
yourself." Another had lost opportunities but he was ad- 
vised that there's no failure except ceasing to try. Finally 
a lady came in deep mourning; she had lost her son in the 
war. The superintendent read some passages to her from 
the life of a gallant Old Boy: 'And so one must just go on 
never doubting that the time will come when I shall see 
him again.' And 'I wonder why a little wooden cross means 
so much when he is far away, and yet I don't suppose so 



18 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

very far.' And he led her to a beautiful picture of One 
who gave His life for others and rose again the third day. 

Before she left the superintendent read her a verse 
which ran as follows: 

Lest Heaven be full of grey beards hoary, 
God, who made boys for His delight. 
Stoops in an hour of grief and glory 
And calls them in, out of the night. 



Memorial Service 



At the annual Memorial Service held on Trinity Sun- 
day, May 27, the Rev. F. H. Cosgrave, Provost of Trinity 
College, preached the sermon, introducing it by the text: 
"All these died in peace". 

The Provost began by reminding us that we were pri- 
marily gathered together on this occasion to pay tribute 
to the eight hundred Old Boys who have served in this, the 
greatest of all wars, and more especially to the j&fty-six 
Old Boys and one Master who have given their lives. These 
men certainly realized the dangers that confronted them, 
but, never wavering, they chose to follow the path of 
Christ and to execute their duties with a full measure of 
devotion. We feel that those who have paid the price 
would not have regretted their choice, and their memory 
is all the more deserving and significant in that they repre- 
sent the countless thousands of young men who have done 
so much to deliver us from the fearful tyranny which 
threatened. 

There are many of us, the Provost concluded, who 
were too young or too old to take a direct part in the fight- 
ing. But, since the price of freedom is eternal vigilance, 
the battle continues. It is up to us to dedicate ourselves 
to the ideals for which these men died. Unless we, the 
youth of the country, are prepared to play our part, the 
future holds but little promise. 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 

Archdeacon Sawers, Sunday, June 3 

On Sunday,- June 3, the last Sunday of term, the Rev. 
Archdeacon Sawers preached at the Evening Service, tak- 
ing his text from the 7th Chapter of St. Paul's Epistle to 
the Corrinthians at the 11th verse: "What is your life?" 
He went on to point out that Life has been described as 
many things, a race, a battle, a stewardship, and a voyage, 
among others. 

But Life is also a Pilgrimage, with a goal to reach, a 
fact that leads us to think of John Bunyan's story of the 
Pilgrim's Progress, where each character exemplifies a 
characteristic of man. Also, we remember the story of 
the great Pilgrimage from the Lepers' Chapel at Glaston- 
bury to Canterbury. Archdeacon Sawers continued by 
stressing that Life is a Stewardship and a mission which 
we cannot own but which is a measure to be filled and not 
a goblet to be emptied. Its aim is service, its law is sacri- 
fice, and its strength is fellowship with God. 

Canon Sawers closed by reminding us that a life of 
grace is a progressive process of mental enlightenment and 
moral purification in mystical union with Christ. 



Speech Day Collection 

The collection for the War Memorial Fund on Speech 
Day amounted to $275.40, the highest amount on record 
at one service at T.C.S. 



Donations from the School 

The following contributions have recently been made 
from the Chapel funds: — 

The Hospital for Sick Children (Building Fund) $200.00 

The Children's Aid Society 25.00 

The Neighborhood Workers (Bolton Camp) 25.00 

The Columbia Coast Mission 15.00 

The Diocese of Moosonee (Work with boys in 

Northern Ontario) 25.00 



20 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 



The Church Bible and Prayer Book Society 

(Provides books for missions, etc.) 15.00 

St. Mark's Church, Port Hope 25.00 

St. John's Church, Port Hope 20.00 




TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 21 

NOTtS 



p. /VN. 





Gifts to the School 

Among the recent donors to the War Memorial Fund 
for the building of a new Chapel are the following: 

S. G. Dobson, G. D. Kirkpatrick, Capt. A. Perley- 
Robertson ('34-'37), James C. Price ('26-'28), Newbold C. 
Jones ('88-'95), Lieut. M. C. D. Bowman ('37-'40), John 

Boulden (J.S.). 

* * * * * 

Col. and Mrs. C. S. Maclnnes have made further 
generous contributions to the Ski Camp. 

* * * * * 

Lieut. Ian Tate ('34-'41), R.C.N.V.R., sent twenty dol- 
lars which is to be used to help furnish the Ski Lodge. 

* * * * * 

Col. H. R. Alley has given a complete set of the Cam- 
bridge Modem History to the Library. 

* * * * * 

Stan Pepler (1911) has given an album of School snap- 
shots taken during his years. 

***** 

Old Boys and Friends of the School contributed over 
$500.00 to the Prize Fund this year, with which the Prize 
Books, Hand Painted School Shields, Cups, Trophies, and 

Medals were purchased. 

* « * « « 

The Ladies' Guilds of Toronto and Montreal have made 
generous contributions to the School during the year in- 
cluding bursaries to the value of four hundred dollars. 



22 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 

Mrs. R. C. Matthews and Mrs. James H. Gundy have 
continued their generous bursaries to the value of $200.00 
each. 



Bain and Congratulations 

We have had more rain during this past term than 
anyone can remember before. According to the boys, there 
were hardly seven fine days from the beginning of term 
on April 11th until Speech Day on June 9th. It was really 
remarkable that we played as many cricket matches and 
as much tennis as we did. Great credit is due to the boys 
for their patience and long suffering under such conditions. 



The Senior School wishes to congratulate the Junior 
School Eleven on winning all its matches, including games 
with Ridley and U.C.C. Such a record augurs well for 
future years. The First Eleven won its matches against 
U.C.C. and St. Andrew's, losing to Ridley on a stormy day. 
Our team showed its best form in the U.C.C. game, Allen 
and Hope batting extremely well, and Cox bowling with 
extraordinary effectiveness. 



Shooting 

The Cadet Corps has won the King George V Cup for 
being the best unit in the best Military District of Canada 
in the Youth of the Empire Shoot for 1944. 

The Corps has also won the Devonshire Trophy for 
coming first in Canada in the same competition. This is 
the fourth successive year the School has won the Devon- 
shire Trophy. 



T.C.S. IN THE WEST 



Nine years ago the Headmaster and Mrs. Ketchum 
visited Old Boys in the West and this year the Governing 
Body decided that the trip should be repeated. It is always 



TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 23 

a thrill to see something of the extraordinary variety of 
our wonderful country after the train turns west from Sud- 
bury — the fascinating north shore of Lake Superior, the 
limitless levels of the prairies, the foothill country with its 
romance of riding the ranges and the exciting feeling of 
new discoveries around every bend, the amazing steeps of 
the Rockies, and finally the thriving Pacific Coast. But it 
is a real inspiration to find across this country so many 
T.C.S. people and to experience such warm hospitality and 
kindness. 

At Winnipeg messages came from Old Boys, and at 
Regina Judge and Mrs. Percy Gordon got on the train to 
travel to Moose Ja